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Old 06-05-2019, 11:43 PM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,384,743 times
Reputation: 30253

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
We Were Liars by Lockhart was one of my favorites. I love this quote: "If anyone asks how it ends, just lie."

I'll try The History of Bees. I think I got this from the library before and had to return. Looks good.
I liked both Station Eleven and especially The Leftovers. The TV series was awful.

Yes, we were liars was one of my favorites, too. Totally unexpected ending. I was so shocked and surprised. It really hit me.
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Old 06-06-2019, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Berwick, Penna.
16,214 posts, read 11,327,268 times
Reputation: 20827
An Honorable Defeat, an account of the last days of the Confederate government, and its Cabinet, in the spring of 1865; the members fled south to Florida and, in a few cases, to Cuba, but most were eventually captured by Union forces.

The book, written in 2001 not long after a surge in Civil War interest and scholarship, dwells heavily upon the clash between Confederate President Jefferson Davis (apparently, not related to author William C. Davis), who urged continued resistance, and Vice-President John C. Breckenridge -- a pragmatist with a stronger underpinning in realpolitik, who advocated a negotiated, albeit harsh, surrender. It's also worth noting that as a native of Kentucky, which did not secede, Breckenridge faced a much stronger prospect of bring tried for treason upon his capture; this is a concept which too many of the partisans caught up in our current national polarization fail to recognize.
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Old 06-06-2019, 07:55 PM
 
Location: East Coast
4,249 posts, read 3,720,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
An Honorable Defeat, an account of the last days of the Confederate government, and its Cabinet, in the spring of 1865; the members fled south to Florida and, in a few cases, to Cuba, but most were eventually captured by Union forces.

The book, written in 2001 not long after a surge in Civil War interest and scholarship, dwells heavily upon the clash between Confederate President Jefferson Davis (apparently, not related to author William C. Davis), who urged continued resistance, and Vice-President John C. Breckenridge -- a pragmatist with a stronger underpinning in realpolitik, who advocated a negotiated, albeit harsh, surrender. It's also worth noting that as a native of Kentucky, which did not secede, Breckenridge faced a much stronger prospect of bring tried for treason upon his capture; this is a concept which too many of the partisans caught up in our current national polarization fail to recognize.
You might like a relatively recent book called The War Before the War. I read it a couple months back and found it really interesting -- the Civil War was inevitable, basically from the time of the revolution. It reminded me so much of the arguments today around immigration and the arguments about state law enforcement enforcing or not enforcing federal laws.
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Old 06-06-2019, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Berwick, Penna.
16,214 posts, read 11,327,268 times
Reputation: 20827
I also found it interesting that while the tensions within Lincoln's cabinet have been depicted in both fiction (Gore Vidal's Lincoln) and non-fiction (Doris Kearns Goodwin's Team of Rivals) this is the first work I've encountered about the conflicts within the upper echelons of the Confederacy.
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Old 06-06-2019, 10:50 PM
 
4,540 posts, read 2,781,896 times
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Red Plenty ~ Francis Spufford
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Old 06-07-2019, 01:57 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
11,479 posts, read 9,138,435 times
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Dark Sacred Night (Harry Bosch #21), Michael Connely 2018.
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Old 06-07-2019, 04:10 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
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I finished something else.

It's a memoir (or "memwah" as the author called it once in the book) by Daniel Menaker, called My Mistake. It's a bit of a mishmash of his personal life and professional life (as an editor for The New Yorker, Random House, etc.) but he blends it all nicely. His writing is lovely -- it reads like he's talking to you, and his turns of phrases bring smiles.

Next up is On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong. It's listed as a novel but it's said to be mostly autobiographical. I'll report back when (if ) I finish it.
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Old 06-07-2019, 09:23 AM
Status: "I don't understand. But I don't care, so it works out." (set 2 days ago)
 
35,605 posts, read 17,935,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
I finished something else.

It's a memoir (or "memwah" as the author called it once in the book) by Daniel Menaker, called My Mistake. It's a bit of a mishmash of his personal life and professional life (as an editor for The New Yorker, Random House, etc.) but he blends it all nicely. His writing is lovely -- it reads like he's talking to you, and his turns of phrases bring smiles.

Next up is On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong. It's listed as a novel but it's said to be mostly autobiographical. I'll report back when (if ) I finish it.
Thank you for that recommendation. I ordered the book - I tend to agree with your taste in books -
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Old 06-07-2019, 01:19 PM
 
4,286 posts, read 4,757,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oeccscclhjhn View Post
Dark Sacred Night (Harry Bosch #21), Michael Connely 2018.
I finished reading the entire Harry Bosch series a few days ago. They are seriously some of the most well-written books I've read and I read a lot. I don't post here much because I usually read "lighter" books than most people on this thread. I'm now working my way through the Lincoln Lawyer books and am really enjoying that series too. I'm a little surprised because I usually don't read books about lawyers. I know there are a few other one-off books out there by Michael Connelly but I much prefer a series. For me it's like visiting with an old friend when you read a new book in the series.

I also read the last two books in Robert Parker's Jesse Stone series. Reed Farrel Coleman, who is writing the books now that Robert Parker has passed, is doing a very good job. It's not quite as good as Robert Parker's writing but it's close IMO.

Not sure what I'll read next. I hate coming to the end of an author's published work when I really like the author.
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Old 06-07-2019, 08:27 PM
 
Location: New York Area
35,003 posts, read 16,972,291 times
Reputation: 30109
On Tuesday I finished First Founders: American Puritans and Puritanism in an Atlantic World by Francis J. Bremer.

The book was a hard but rewarding read. It contains a lot of information that I was not familiar with, and it took me some time to read. The book did not take me five months to read; I frequently had to put it down because my head was spinning from the amount of new material.

The book gives some vital insights into the origins of how America became America; the Puritans believed that America was the new Jerusalem. Even though I am not a Puritan (I am Jewish) it is easy to understand how different a society America was from Europe, even though many of not most Americans are descended from Europeans. The book hints at how we became both an individualistic and democratic society.

I returned to reading American Default: The Untold Story of FDR, the Supreme Court, and the Battle Over Gold by Sebastian Edwards. This book concerns the U.S.'s withdrawal from the gold standard in 1933, immediately after Roosevelt took office. Despite my distaste for Roosevelt he probably got this one right.

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