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Old 08-02-2019, 12:48 AM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,386,066 times
Reputation: 30253

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The Luminaries is very slow going. I don't understand how one can like the phrasing. It is very old/odd and I often have to backtrack an re-read several sentence because my mind keeps wandering.
It seems to be a nice story but (and I'm only 260 pages into the 800 plus) I believe it could have become better when the author had only used half the words... However, I don't want to stop reading because of the many good recommendations.
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Old 08-02-2019, 05:55 PM
Status: "I don't understand. But I don't care, so it works out." (set 5 days ago)
 
35,622 posts, read 17,953,728 times
Reputation: 50641
I'm about halfway through "All We Ever Wanted" by Emily Giffin.

If you enjoyed "The Dinner" by Herman Koch, you'll like this one too. They're very similar.

Very wealthy Nashville philanthropist couple, living a lovely life, about to send a son to Princeton, when he does something awful and puts all his future success in peril. How that ripples out to the family, and the victim, and those around them, and the grief/disappointment they suffer.

In The Dinner, the act that the teenage boy did was much, much worse - unthinkably worse - but in the case of All We Ever Wanted, it's something that you could imagine a normal young man doing in a moment of complete thoughtlessness.

Feels real, well-written. I'm interested to read how it ends.
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Old 08-02-2019, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
17,214 posts, read 57,064,697 times
Reputation: 18579
Having read Master and Margarita by Bulgakov in the original Russian, now I am reading "Ugrum Reka" (approximate English translation "Sullen River") by Shiskov. Basic plot is a motley crew of anti-heroes drink, brawl, and screw their way across Siberia around 1905, set against the impending Red revolution.


But my Russian tutor has that beat - he has read the Bhagavad-Gita in the original Sanskrit!
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Old 08-03-2019, 04:24 AM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
3,836 posts, read 1,784,958 times
Reputation: 5007
Quote:
Originally Posted by oeccscclhjhn View Post
it's tough sometimes starting a book. kind of like watching a movie; you don't know if it's one in i don't know how many that you will walk out on.

^ this one is good. page turner. i just got on the list for half a dozen of his kindle books, and borrowed / downloaded two more. great non-fiction...
Thanks for the recommendation. Will put a hold for it at the library.
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Old 08-03-2019, 04:54 AM
 
1,428 posts, read 1,405,904 times
Reputation: 3684
The Outsider by Stephen King
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Old 08-03-2019, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,254,661 times
Reputation: 3809
Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
Having read Master and Margarita by Bulgakov in the original Russian, now I am reading "Ugrum Reka" (approximate English translation "Sullen River") by Shiskov. Basic plot is a motley crew of anti-heroes drink, brawl, and screw their way across Siberia around 1905, set against the impending Red revolution.


But my Russian tutor has that beat - he has read the Bhagavad-Gita in the original Sanskrit!
I read the Master and Margarita. The mini series, A Young Doctor's Notebook was very good.
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Old 08-03-2019, 11:52 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,932,925 times
Reputation: 7237
I'm giving up on Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng. In the opening chapter a young girl dies. I'll never know what happened to her and I don't care.

Each time I posted about this book I had to look up the title. That should have been a clue that I was just not into this book.
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Old 08-03-2019, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Middle of the valley
48,518 posts, read 34,833,342 times
Reputation: 73739
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I'm giving up on Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng. In the opening chapter a young girl dies. I'll never know what happened to her and I don't care.

Each time I posted about this book I had to look up the title. That should have been a clue that I was just not into this book.

I liked it, and thought the underlying message was well done. But plenty of popular books I couldn't get through either.
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Old 08-03-2019, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
3,836 posts, read 1,784,958 times
Reputation: 5007
finished "The girl left behind: A Novel" by Roxanne Veletzos

This was a really well written novel. Read it quickly and enjoyed the story. To clarify this book was inspired by the authors true family of survival during WWII.
I'd give it 4 stars, but still had questions after reading that weren't addressed, even in the epilogue.
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Old 08-03-2019, 07:21 PM
 
Location: prescott az
6,957 posts, read 12,058,216 times
Reputation: 14245
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
I'm about halfway through "All We Ever Wanted" by Emily Giffin.

If you enjoyed "The Dinner" by Herman Koch, you'll like this one too. They're very similar.

Very wealthy Nashville philanthropist couple, living a lovely life, about to send a son to Princeton, when he does something awful and puts all his future success in peril. How that ripples out to the family, and the victim, and those around them, and the grief/disappointment they suffer.

In The Dinner, the act that the teenage boy did was much, much worse - unthinkably worse - but in the case of All We Ever Wanted, it's something that you could imagine a normal young man doing in a moment of complete thoughtlessness.

Feels real, well-written. I'm interested to read how it ends.
I wasn't at all happy with the ending of "All We Ever Wanted". Just seemed like the writer had to quickly put an ending to the story and tie up loose ends. It was very disappointing to me.
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