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Old 02-05-2020, 03:47 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,784 posts, read 24,086,869 times
Reputation: 27092

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Originally Posted by ben young View Post
Was a GREAT book.


The movie is good too .
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Old 02-05-2020, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Berwick, Penna.
16,215 posts, read 11,335,819 times
Reputation: 20828
Currently it's The Warmth of Other Suns, by Isabel Wilkerson; a story of what has come to be called the Great Migration -- of African-Americans from the agrarian South to the industrialized North in the first 2/3 of the Twentieth Century -- a fitting companion to The Promised Land -- PBS' documentary of 25 years ago.

The work contains the usual (and understandable) leavening of accounts of the repression and brutality pf the Jim Crow era. But having been raised on a dairy farm (in the North) myself, I have to take issue with the failure of most present-day scholars, usually raised and/or nurtured in the cocoon of Academia, to recognize and understand that until the close of World War II, a disparity of living conditions and lifestyles between rural and urbanized blue-collar whites created its own set of resentments and distortions; Volume 9 (Depression and War) of the Oxford History of the United States contains some fine insights here.

My father was a World War II draftee -- conscripted late in the war due to loss of a deferment previously granted to family farm workers, and assigned to an infantry company -- all white, but thrown together with contingents of both predominately-Protestant Southerners and ethnic Catholics and Jews from the cities of the Eastern Seaboard; accounts of the tensions between the two factions left me vary thankful that Harry Truman's use of the Bomb ensured that that company never saw combat.

More than any other single societal event, the Great Migration broke the back of Jim Crow; but it should also be recognized that the basic human desire for a better life had much more to do with this than political fighting and legislation, whether from the (partially-) enlightened North or the Obstructionist South.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 02-05-2020 at 04:54 PM..
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Old 02-05-2020, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Calgary, Canada
1,163 posts, read 1,236,937 times
Reputation: 1205
Just started Open Book by Jessica Simpson
Have loved her since she first started out
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Old 02-06-2020, 02:17 AM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,387,229 times
Reputation: 30253
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Thank you, miguel’s mom. The title of the book I could not remember is actually In the Wake of Madness: The Murderous Voyage of the Whaleship Sharon, by Joan Druett. This voyage was about an increasingly harsh dictator-like captain and the inevitable mutiny against him. If you have not read it, you’ll probably find it worth checking out. Some of the cruelties the captain inflicted were difficult to read about, and I could see why a mutiny occurred, even without the pressure-cooker of the environment and job that were normal.

The names Nathaniel Philbrick and the ship Essex continue to pull at something in my mind, and I might very well have read both these books. Only way to be sure is to look through the book itelf. I need to go to the library today to return a couple of books and get three more, so I’ll see if they have In the Heart of the Sea.

I believe that the circumstances of being on the sea for several months or even years under these conditions can change a person's attitudes. It certainly can bring out brutal character streaks and make some think they have absolute power. It must have been a very difficult life and time.

The biggest difficulties I had while reading the parts of killing the whales. The thousands upon thousands of animals that were killed and the wonder that there are still huge families roaming the seas, that they weren't extinguished.

It is very moving what people might be able to when they are dying of thirst and hunger. The topic of cannibalism must have moved the people around the survivors.
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Old 02-06-2020, 06:06 AM
 
Location: East Coast
4,249 posts, read 3,724,745 times
Reputation: 6487
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
Currently it's The Warmth of Other Suns, by Isabel Wilkerson; a story of what has come to be called the Great Migration -- of African-Americans from the agrarian South to the industrialized North in the first 2/3 of the Twentieth Century -- a fitting companion to The Promised Land -- PBS' documentary of 25 years ago.

The work contains the usual (and understandable) leavening of accounts of the repression and brutality pf the Jim Crow era. But having been raised on a dairy farm (in the North) myself, I have to take issue with the failure of most present-day scholars, usually raised and/or nurtured in the cocoon of Academia, to recognize and understand that until the close of World War II, a disparity of living conditions and lifestyles between rural and urbanized blue-collar whites created its own set of resentments and distortions; Volume 9 (Depression and War) of the Oxford History of the United States contains some fine insights here.

My father was a World War II draftee -- conscripted late in the war due to loss of a deferment previously granted to family farm workers, and assigned to an infantry company -- all white, but thrown together with contingents of both predominately-Protestant Southerners and ethnic Catholics and Jews from the cities of the Eastern Seaboard; accounts of the tensions between the two factions left me vary thankful that Harry Truman's use of the Bomb ensured that that company never saw combat.

More than any other single societal event, the Great Migration broke the back of Jim Crow; but it should also be recognized that the basic human desire for a better life had much more to do with this than political fighting and legislation, whether from the (partially-) enlightened North or the Obstructionist South.
Well, but northern farmers, regardless of how rural or how poor weren't living under a system of apartheid, where they would be brutally murdered for no reason other than the color of their skin.
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Old 02-06-2020, 07:26 AM
 
831 posts, read 412,794 times
Reputation: 940
Just Finished "Invention of Wings" by Sue Monk Kidd (an Oprah Book Club Selection) https://www.amazon.com/Invention-Win.../dp/0143121707

This was a 4.5 star read for me.

I happened to notice that Sue Monk Kidd is releasing a new book "The Book of Longings: A Novel" to be released on April 21, 2020.
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Old 02-06-2020, 10:02 AM
 
9,868 posts, read 7,700,279 times
Reputation: 22124
Quote:
Originally Posted by miguel's mom View Post
I believe that the circumstances of being on the sea for several months or even years under these conditions can change a person's attitudes. It certainly can bring out brutal character streaks and make some think they have absolute power. It must have been a very difficult life and time.

The biggest difficulties I had while reading the parts of killing the whales. The thousands upon thousands of animals that were killed and the wonder that there are still huge families roaming the seas, that they weren't extinguished.

It is very moving what people might be able to when they are dying of thirst and hunger. The topic of cannibalism must have moved the people around the survivors.
I hope one of the area libraries gets a new book about cannibalism that was published last year. Also, a book by Caitlin Doughty called Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? She is a CA mortician whose NPR interview I listened to last year. Seems like there has been a resurgence of fascinating and widely varied nonfiction books in the last few years. Bring it on!

BTW, yesterday when I returned The Innocents and Plastic Soup—both highly recommended—the librarian asked me if I had liked the former, which I had. Turns out she had been to Newfoundland quite a bit, had read all Crummey’s books, and met him. She was the one who urged the library to purchase its copy. Small world, indeed.
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Old 02-07-2020, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Chicago
8 posts, read 2,883 times
Reputation: 28
I’ve just read the Atlas shrugged Ayn Rand. It’s an epic. It really gave me a lot to think about. What can cause the collapse of an entire society? As the main question. And many others. It’s not exactly light reading.
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Old 02-07-2020, 09:37 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
68,329 posts, read 54,389,283 times
Reputation: 40736
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
I hope one of the area libraries gets a new book about cannibalism that was published last year. Also, a book by Caitlin Doughty called Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs? She is a CA mortician whose NPR interview I listened to last year. Seems like there has been a resurgence of fascinating and widely varied nonfiction books in the last few years. Bring it on!


She writes some interesting stuff. I've read two of her earlier books, Smoke gets in your eyes : & other lessons from the crematory and From here to eternity : traveling the world to find the good death, will have to put the one about what cats will do to my eyeballs on reserve.
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Old 02-07-2020, 01:23 PM
 
Location: East Coast
4,249 posts, read 3,724,745 times
Reputation: 6487
I was able to finish up Ohio, and I still don't know what to think of it. We did have a really great discussion at our book club. Some people loved it and others not so much.

I started a legal thriller called The Holdout. (Two novels in a row for me -- a real anomaly.) After Ohio, this one is a breeze - I'm already more than a third of the way through. So far, it's very enjoyable and I do like this author - Graham Moore. He wrote a historical novel called The Last Days of Night about Edison and Tesla and electric current. That did involve legal issues, as does this one, but it doesn't appear that he himself is a lawyer, so I found his portrayals of law firms (especially in the previous book) to be pretty impressive. It's harder to tell with this one -- it's a murder mystery, and I think it is hard to write these well (and to have them resolve in a satisfactory manner - it seems like too often either you see the resolution coming from 100 miles away, or it seems like a deus ex machina maneuver), so we'll see how I feel at the end of the book. But so far, so good.
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