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Old 02-16-2020, 03:55 PM
 
153 posts, read 138,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KiwiKate View Post
I'm reading my first ever sci-fi book, The Left Hand of Darkness - Ursula Le Guin, for my book club. I'm not very far into it, but to my surprise, I'm enjoying it. While I could not name the characters or the planet because their names are made up, the story line is sticking with me. I initially thought it was going to be a slog when the title and genre was shared, I find I look forward to picking the book up in the evening to continue the exploration. The book was written 50 years ago but the story translates extraordinarily well to life in 2020. My librarian friend says Le Guin is a much admired and lauded sci-fi author.
Every now and then I like to read a book written decades ago; I just finished reading, "My Antonia" and "O, Pioneers," both by Willa Cather and written in the early 20th century. Now that's pretty old.

I'm currently reading "The Angel Makers," which is based on a true story, but the author has embellished certain events and changed names and places. The women of a small Hungarian village have seen their husbands off to war (WWI) and begin to enjoy their freedom sans husbands. As the men return home they begin to drop dead, one after another. It's a sick subject, for sure, but hard to put down.
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Old 02-16-2020, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
3,836 posts, read 1,783,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Most books I read are from the library, and some I buy at bookstores.

First, two of the three libraries within a 40-minute drive from home participate in a statewide library lending program. Whatever they don’t have locally can often be borrowed from a distant library. You just have to request it and wait for it to become both available for circulation and scheduled for deliveries. I have borrowed books from libraries that are an 8- to 9-hour drive away! It is fun to see where they come from.
Do you have to pay for your use of inter-library loan? Where I live each inter library loan is $5 so I have never borrowed from it. I tend to borrow books thru e-book from the library, or buy from Amazon or Barnes and Noble.
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Old 02-16-2020, 09:52 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,798,999 times
Reputation: 4925
Default Bad policy, I think

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wintergirl80 View Post
Do you have to pay for your use of inter-library loan? Where I live each inter library loan is $5 so I have never borrowed from it. I tend to borrow books thru e-book from the library, or buy from Amazon or Barnes and Noble.
Yes, I was very surprised to learn that our local public library charges a fee (up to $10? $20?) for each interlibrary loan (depending on what fee the sending library charges per item), plus return postage to send material back to the lending library. All the interlibrary loans I'd gotten before were free - or were covered by a budget item within that library, I suppose.

Given the technology & availability of used or PDF or otherwise electronic versions of most books, I can usually find a copy to borrow or to buy for less than $5. & so far, I haven't had to get anything through interlibrary loan here. A pity, really - the lack of demand may permit the public libraries to simply drop the service altogether, on the theory that if there's no demand for the service, there's no reason to provide it. I think they've simply priced themselves out of the market. A pennywise & pound-foolish decision, in my opinion.
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Old 02-17-2020, 05:33 AM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,417,821 times
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Wow I am surprised about the charge for interlibrary loan. I have only done it a handful of times, but there was no charge.
We moved a little over a year ago to a new library system ( new state new county etc). and the only thing our new library charges for is dvds. I rarely borrow them but I was surprised that there was a charge. I think it is $1 a night or for 3 nights I really don't remember.
I particularly love the feature of reserving books and ebooks. I have a bunch on reserve and you can suspend a hold (although I often forget) and often like now, I have 2 or 3 books that I have waited for, available at once. Oh well.
Still the library is the best!
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Old 02-17-2020, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,025,722 times
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The term "inter-library loan" is a funky thing that's open to interpretation. I always think of another "branch" as another "library" (hence inter-library), but that's not the case.

Here, my nearest library is "Ruth Dickinson Library."
That is one of the branches of OPL (Ottawa Public Library), my city's library.
There are approximately 35 branches in the OPL library network.
One branch loans to another branch all the time, free of charge.

If there's a book that you want that none of the locations has -- it's not in the OPL network -- that's an inter-library loan. Meaning they have to get it from a library that's outside of our network, outside of my city. (We can make these requests 4 times per month, no charge.)
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Old 02-17-2020, 08:22 AM
 
829 posts, read 411,623 times
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I only finished "House Girl" by Tara Conklin because it was the last book on my library pile and I had nothing else to read, other than that I would have definitely given up on it, I slogged my way through the entire book.

My first book off of my new library pile was "Pond" by Claire-Louise Bennett https://www.amazon.com/Pond-Claire-L.../dp/0399575901

This was a four star read for me. It was filled with wry humor, which I enjoy. It was a short book at 195 pages and I finished it in one day.

"At the same time, one needs to be careful with names. Names in books are nearly always names from real life and so already the reader is bound to have some knowledge about a person with a particular name such as Miriam and even if that reader's mind is robust and adaptable some little thing about Miriam in real life will infiltrate Miriam in the book so that it doesn't matter how many times her earlobes are referred to as dainty and girlish in the reader's mind Miriam's earlobes are forever florid and pendulous."

Last edited by Firehorse66; 02-17-2020 at 08:31 AM..
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Old 02-17-2020, 09:06 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,932,925 times
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I found a copy of Remembering Laughter by Wallace Stegner on the "Leave/Take" bookshelf of my beach place. I'm always intrigued by the books that other people leave here.

This is Stegner's first book (a novella, really) and was written in 1937 when he was only 28 years old - a full 50 years before my favorite book of his, Crossing to Safety. It's a quick read and the story is old-fashioned and "light", but you can definitely tell that his writing talent was present early on and he developed significantly as an author over the years.
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Old 02-17-2020, 09:22 AM
 
9,868 posts, read 7,696,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wintergirl80 View Post
Do you have to pay for your use of inter-library loan? Where I live each inter library loan is $5 so I have never borrowed from it. I tend to borrow books thru e-book from the library, or buy from Amazon or Barnes and Noble.
Ours is free. I don’t know how it is financed. That’s something worth asking at the libraries that participate: How do you do it? I would be happy to donate to such a program if it is funded that way. As it is now, I donate books to all the local libraries and belong to a Friends group of the one I use most (it’s the closest place). That library does not participate in the interlibrary network and I have wondered why. It might be a need to update computer systems and use the shared database the others use.
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Old 02-17-2020, 09:40 AM
 
9,868 posts, read 7,696,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwest88 View Post
Yes, I was very surprised to learn that our local public library charges a fee (up to $10? $20?) for each interlibrary loan (depending on what fee the sending library charges per item), plus return postage to send material back to the lending library. All the interlibrary loans I'd gotten before were free - or were covered by a budget item within that library, I suppose.

Given the technology & availability of used or PDF or otherwise electronic versions of most books, I can usually find a copy to borrow or to buy for less than $5. & so far, I haven't had to get anything through interlibrary loan here. A pity, really - the lack of demand may permit the public libraries to simply drop the service altogether, on the theory that if there's no demand for the service, there's no reason to provide it. I think they've simply priced themselves out of the market. A pennywise & pound-foolish decision, in my opinion.
Postage? That would explain the cost. Sending anything other than envelopes via mail or commercial transport has become very expensive. I heard a librarian refer to interlibrary books being driven around; that’s why delivery dates are unpredictable. Sounded like there might be a library-hopping truck or something like that. Maybe participating libraries pay a fee to make the collective system work economically?

Pennywise and pound foolish, indeed. There is so much hand-wringing about “our educational system” which too often fixates on teacher salaries and perks. Education encompasses much, much more than the schools. Parents play a big role in firing up kids’ minds and helping them learn the discipline they’ll need to practice in all endeavors scholastic and otherwise. Libraries also play a big role, in opening up a world of thought as written and illustrated by unseen people. Some libraries are better and/or have more to offer than others, often due to local financial constraints. Interlibrary lending helps the smaller ones, AND it is a way to have less-popular titles be accessed by many more people than they would reach in one area.

Just thought of another benefit to interlibrary lending: Large, well-funded libraries are not merely “givers” to smaller/rural/poorer libraries. They, too, benefit. Many small-town libraries have fascinating, limited-printing books on specific local natural features or human history. You won’t find those in mainstream collections or bookstores outside of the region, though if you visit lots of good used-book stores or estate sales, you might get lucky. But there won’t be a searchable database and free or cheap lending with those.

Yes, I love books with all my heart. The one thing my mother did that really stands out as particularly good and loving to me was that, before I was of school age, she sometimes read to me at bedtime. I learned to read before starting school. This was a big deal, because our inner-city school was not very good.

Last edited by pikabike; 02-17-2020 at 10:16 AM..
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Old 02-17-2020, 09:48 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,798,999 times
Reputation: 4925
Default The mysteries of administration

Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Postage? That would explain the cost. Sending anything other than envelopes via mail or commercial transport has become very expensive. I heard a librarian refer to interlibrary books being driven around; that’s why delivery dates are unpredictable. Sounded like there might be a library-hopping truck or something like that. Maybe participating libraries pay a fee to make the collective system work economically?


US Mail has special media rates for books, electronic media, etc. & thinking back, most of my library experience from 1974 to 2010 was with a large urban library system, which combined with other libraries to become a county-based unit. Maybe scale has something to do with payment for interlibrary loan - my previous library was the biggest of the bunch, & so it was typically sending out material to other libraries for interlibrary loan.
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