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Old 06-01-2020, 08:52 AM
 
Location: East Coast
3,787 posts, read 2,323,486 times
Reputation: 5757

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I just finished up This Tender Land -- wow - it was GREAT. I gave it 5 stars on goodreads, which is rare for me. I also didn't really want it to end, which is also very rare.

Some people compared it to Crawdads, and I can see some similarities, but I liked this much better. (Although I did like Crawdads.)
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Old 06-01-2020, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,256 posts, read 7,438,045 times
Reputation: 3689
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
I just finished up This Tender Land -- wow - it was GREAT. I gave it 5 stars on goodreads, which is rare for me. I also didn't really want it to end, which is also very rare.

Some people compared it to Crawdads, and I can see some similarities, but I liked this much better. (Although I did like Crawdads.)
I read it last year. it was excellent. As yet, not read Crawdads.
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Old 06-01-2020, 10:28 AM
 
3,146 posts, read 6,758,093 times
Reputation: 6131
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
I just finished up This Tender Land -- wow - it was GREAT. I gave it 5 stars on goodreads, which is rare for me. I also didn't really want it to end, which is also very rare.

Some people compared it to Crawdads, and I can see some similarities, but I liked this much better. (Although I did like Crawdads.)
Ahhhh - this one looks good! Thank you for the recommendation. I loved all of the parts of Crawdads that didn't have to do with the teen romance, so I hope that is enough.
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Old 06-01-2020, 07:07 PM
 
269 posts, read 28,946 times
Reputation: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
When I was in high school I started reading Little Dorrit for a Literature class and ended up whiffing on it before the third chapter and wrote a report that was almost solely based on Cliffs Notes. I'm not one tiny bit proud of that nonsense!

A few years ago I decided to try to right the wrong and checked out Little Dorrit from the library. It took more than a few pages, but sure enough, I got hooked and plowed through the rest of it. Mrs. Donahue probably never knew that I didn't read it, and she certainly won't ever know that I finally did, but I know and that is what counts.
I've just moved on to Little Dorrit today.

I'll have to admit, in college I got an A in a Shakespeare class without reading anything other than Cliffs Notes the entire semester.
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Old 06-01-2020, 08:28 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,244 posts, read 1,919,877 times
Reputation: 4143
Default An upcoming author

American dirt / Jeanine Cummins, c2019, Flatiron Books.

Subjects
• Drug traffic -- Mexico -- Fiction.
• Organized crime -- Mexico -- Fiction.
• Immigrants -- Mexican-American Border Region -- Fiction.

Summary
• "También de este lado hay sueños. Lydia Quixano Perez lives in the Mexican city of Acapulco. She runs a bookstore. She has a son, Luca, the love of her life, and a wonderful husband who is a journalist. And while there are cracks beginning to show in Acapulco because of the drug cartels, her life is, by and large, fairly comfortable. Even though she knows they'll never sell, Lydia stocks some of her all-time favorite books in her store. And then one day a man enters the shop to browse and comes up to the register with four books he would like to buy-two of them her favorites. Javier is erudite. He is charming. And, unbeknownst to Lydia, he is the jefe of the newest drug cartel that has gruesomely taken over the city. When Lydia's husband's tell-all profile of Javier is published, none of their lives will ever be the same. Forced to flee, Lydia and eight-year-old Luca soon find themselves miles and worlds away from their comfortable middle-class existence. Instantly transformed into migrants, Lydia and Luca ride la bestia-trains that make their way north toward the United States, which is the only place Javier's reach doesn't extend. As they join the countless people trying to reach el norte, Lydia soon sees that everyone is running from something. But what exactly are they running to? American Dirt will leave readers utterly changed when they finish reading it. A page-turner filled with poignancy, drama, and humanity on every page, it is a literary achievement."-- Provided by publisher.

Length 386 pages ; map on end pages

An incandescent novel, based on reality. I’m looking forward to reading her biography, A rip in Heaven : a memoir of murder and its aftermath / Jeanine Cummins, c2004, New American Library.

Subjects
• Murder -- Missouri -- Case studies.
• Cousins.
• Brothers and sisters.

Summary
• The author recounts the events surrounding the murders of her two cousins and brutal assault of her brother in 1991 just outside of St. Louis and the betrayal, harassment, and cover-up that ensued during the investigation and trial of the perpetrators.
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Old 06-01-2020, 08:44 PM
 
529 posts, read 191,143 times
Reputation: 937
I'm reading "Hitler's Furies" German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields. Its author is Wendy Lower.

This is a history of German women in the Holocaust and it reveals their roles as plunderers, witnesses, and actual executioners on the Eastern Front during World War 2. The author describes how nurses, teachers, secretaries, and wives responded to what they believed to be Nazi opportunities, only to perform brutal duties.

These perpetrators were largely ignored after the end of World War 2. The war crimes trials conducted by the victorious Allies limited their female prosecutions to a few thousand concentration camp guards.
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Old 06-01-2020, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
10,824 posts, read 6,886,556 times
Reputation: 18732
Immoral (Jonathan Stride #1), Brian Freeman 2005.
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Old 06-02-2020, 07:51 AM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,525 posts, read 4,822,257 times
Reputation: 29889
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I'm currently reading Katheryn Howard - the Scandalous Queen by Alison Weir and I really, really like it. I just reordered Year of Wonders because a book worth reading is worth reading twice most of the time - at least to me!

I'm glad somebody recommended Year of Wonders. It's a great story and one of my favorites of this year so far.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I’m re- reading book 5 of the Outlander series in preparation for the next season. I get new info that I missed the first time.

20 years ago I started to read the outlander series. I've re-read all of them, the first four or five at least 3 times. I think it's my favorite series.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayvenne View Post
Had to search and see where this was recommended. I was able to get it on kindle from the library. I just started it and at first I wasn't sure, but now at all the way of about 10% in, I think The Fever Tree is really drawing me in. Thanks for suggesting!

I hope you still like it. Even though it's a harsh live in this barren land the story is cutting really deep.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Firehorse66 View Post
I'm reading The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy right now and enjoying it. I'm pretty sure I read The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry (but really don't remember it) so I will also read or re-read? It might actually be even more enjoyable reading it AFTER The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy.

Let us know which one you find better. I started with Harold Fry and ready Queenie Hennessy afterwards. However, I preferred Harold Fry.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
I re-read A Christmas Carol almost every December. Dickens' writing is just astounding.

Never read anything by Dickens yet. I guess I need to look for a cheap used book of the Christmas Carol


It's been a while since I checked in here and found many books that went onto my TBR pile.
Finished Call of the Wild, All Things Bright and Beautiful and The Summer of Skinny Dipping over the last days. 2 stars, 3 stars, 3 stars.


Just started A lesson Before Dying. A pretty heavy topic. I hope iI'm in the mood for this kind of story right now.
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Old 06-02-2020, 11:54 AM
 
Location: East Coast
3,787 posts, read 2,323,486 times
Reputation: 5757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nearwest View Post
I'm reading "Hitler's Furies" German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields. Its author is Wendy Lower.

This is a history of German women in the Holocaust and it reveals their roles as plunderers, witnesses, and actual executioners on the Eastern Front during World War 2. The author describes how nurses, teachers, secretaries, and wives responded to what they believed to be Nazi opportunities, only to perform brutal duties.

These perpetrators were largely ignored after the end of World War 2. The war crimes trials conducted by the victorious Allies limited their female prosecutions to a few thousand concentration camp guards.
Sounds interesting! Added it to my list.
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Old 06-02-2020, 12:01 PM
 
14,830 posts, read 6,097,412 times
Reputation: 34216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firehorse66 View Post
I'm reading The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy right now and enjoying it. I'm pretty sure I read The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry (but really don't remember it) so I will also read or re-read? It might actually be even more enjoyable reading it AFTER The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy.
That funny you say that. I read that a couple years ago (I know, because I keep a list of books I read) and chose it again from the Little Library, having forgotten I'd read it. I got a little ways into it and it seemed very vaguely familiar, so I looked at the plot and I just don't remember it. I remember tiny snippets - but for a book that I liked fairly well, it's amazing that I have almost no memory of what it was about.
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