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Old 06-20-2020, 05:33 AM
 
43,657 posts, read 44,385,284 times
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I am in the middle of "Women of Valor: The Rochambelles on the WWII Front" by Ellen Hampton. Who knew that there were female ambulance drivers in Europe during WW2?!
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Old 06-20-2020, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,255,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
I am in the middle of "Women of Valor: The Rochambelles on the WWII Front" by Ellen Hampton. Who knew that there were female ambulance drivers in Europe during WW2?!
Sounds interesting. I’ve been reading a few books about women’s involvement in France during the war.
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Old 06-20-2020, 01:03 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,800,346 times
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Default Duty called

Code girls : the untold story of the American women code breakers of World War II / Liza Mundy, 1960- , c2017, Hachette Books, 940.5486 MUND.

Subjects
World War, 1939-1945 -- Cryptography.
World War, 1939-1945 -- Participation, Female.
Cryptographers -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Cryptography -- United States -- History -- 20th century.

Summary
Recruited by the U.S. Army and Navy from small towns and elite colleges, more than ten thousand women served as codebreakers during World War II. While their brothers and boyfriends took up arms, these women moved to Washington and learned the meticulous work of code-breaking. Their efforts shortened the war, saved countless lives, and gave them access to careers previously denied to them.

Length
xiv, 416 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : chapter notes, bibliography, index

Most of the code breakers & associated personnel in the US, even before the war, were women. & some of them were brilliant, they broke IJ Red, Purple, & took over breaking Enigma, plus all the various codes & other communications out there in the World. They worked in anonymity, & are thus hardly known. This book pulls away the veil, & reveals heroes.
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Old 06-21-2020, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
11,479 posts, read 9,143,131 times
Reputation: 19660
Finished People of Darkness (Leaphorn & Chee #4), Tony Hillerman 1980.

Reading The Dark Wind (Leaphorn & Chee #5), Tony Hillerman 1981.
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Old 06-22-2020, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Maine
22,921 posts, read 28,268,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justjagginyinz View Post
Just finished A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E.Schwab. [/i]
I started that last week. enjoyed it a lot at first, but I'm about a third of the way in and having a hard time staying interested. The main character isn't all that interesting. The secondary character is a total Mary Sue. And even though I'm a third of the way in, the story is just now getting started.

Worldbuilding is fun though.

Does it get better? If not, I may move on to something else. Life is too short to spend on books you don't enjoy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by justjagginyinz View Post
Also finished in one sitting last night--Gwendy's Button Box by Stephen King and Richard Chizmar
I loved that one. Haven't read the sequel yet.
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Old 06-22-2020, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
11,479 posts, read 9,143,131 times
Reputation: 19660
Leaphorn & Chee #6

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Old 06-23-2020, 07:04 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,934,076 times
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I am a little more than half way through This Tender Land by William Kent Kreuger. It is good - maybe not great - but certainly a good, old-fashioned story-tellers story. Though it pushes the limits of believability, I'm OK with that because it is fiction and a story and I'm enjoying this authors tale-spinning.

But..... I have decided that "If you liked Where the Crawdads Sing, you'll love - (fill in the blank of the latest novel with a scrappy young person)" is the 2020 version of "If you liked Gone Girl". Remember how "If you like Gone Girl" showed up on the cover (or back ) of dozens of books that trailed after it - many of which had little if any similarities to Gone Girl? Same with this one. Tender Land and Crawdads are both fiction. They both take place in the 20th century. They both involve poverty and kids who overcome hard circumstances. Just like hundreds and hundreds of other books way before them.

Ok - done. Thanks for listening to that brief rant! Back to reading now.
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Old 06-23-2020, 07:54 AM
 
829 posts, read 412,347 times
Reputation: 940
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I am a little more than half way through This Tender Land by William Kent Kreuger. It is good - maybe not great - but certainly a good, old-fashioned story-tellers story. Though it pushes the limits of believability, I'm OK with that because it is fiction and a story and I'm enjoying this authors tale-spinning.

But..... I have decided that "If you liked Where the Crawdads Sing, you'll love - (fill in the blank of the latest novel with a scrappy young person)" is the 2020 version of "If you liked Gone Girl". Remember how "If you like Gone Girl" showed up on the cover (or back ) of dozens of books that trailed after it - many of which had little if any similarities to Gone Girl? Same with this one. Tender Land and Crawdads are both fiction. They both take place in the 20th century. They both involve poverty and kids who overcome hard circumstances. Just like hundreds and hundreds of other books way before them.

Ok - done. Thanks for listening to that brief rant! Back to reading now.
I also recently picked up "This Tender Land" and was unimpressed with it, in fact, I didn't even finish it...
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Old 06-23-2020, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Maine
22,921 posts, read 28,268,441 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Firehorse66 View Post
I also recently picked up "This Tender Land" and was unimpressed with it, in fact, I didn't even finish it...
I genuinely love a lot of Krueger's early work. His more recent efforts haven't impressed me.

I liked Ordinary Grace quite a lot. But even his Cork O'Connor books seem to have lost steam.
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Old 06-23-2020, 11:21 AM
 
Location: East Coast
4,249 posts, read 3,722,770 times
Reputation: 6487
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I am a little more than half way through This Tender Land by William Kent Kreuger. It is good - maybe not great - but certainly a good, old-fashioned story-tellers story. Though it pushes the limits of believability, I'm OK with that because it is fiction and a story and I'm enjoying this authors tale-spinning.

But..... I have decided that "If you liked Where the Crawdads Sing, you'll love - (fill in the blank of the latest novel with a scrappy young person)" is the 2020 version of "If you liked Gone Girl". Remember how "If you like Gone Girl" showed up on the cover (or back ) of dozens of books that trailed after it - many of which had little if any similarities to Gone Girl? Same with this one. Tender Land and Crawdads are both fiction. They both take place in the 20th century. They both involve poverty and kids who overcome hard circumstances. Just like hundreds and hundreds of other books way before them.

Ok - done. Thanks for listening to that brief rant! Back to reading now.
Lol. I liked This Tender Land. I've kind of compared it to Crawdads, in that a lot of people seemed to love Crawdads (which I liked but didn't love -- I liked Tender Land more), in that it's historical fiction, involving young people keeping themselves alive. Some groups I'm in get a lot of questions from people who say they just finished Crawdads and loved it, and what could they read next? I feel like most people who loved Crawdads should at least like Tender Land.

But TOTALLY agree with Gone Girl -- I saw so many books compared to it, and never saw any comparison whatsoever. Anything with an unreliable narrator was called the new Gone Girl, no matter how different the story. And any thriller or mystery also got slapped with "just like Gone Girl."
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