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Old 07-30-2020, 06:12 PM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,417,821 times
Reputation: 8481

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
I'm reading "The Bookwoman of Troublesome Creek" by Kim Richardson. Fiction but based on reality.

It's set in the depression, when the WPA hired women to run mobile libraries to families in the hollers of Appalachia. By horseback.

This particular woman is part of the Blue community in Troublesome Creek Kentucky (really did happen). The blue people were treated harshly by everyone, even black people who were also treated badly.

Show of hands. Who knew there were Blue people who lived in Kentucky in the 20th century? Learn something new every day. Last one with this blue skin gene was born in 1975.

Anyway, the writing is so-so and cliche, but I can't get over blue people, and the fact of the reality that children were starving to death in our country not even a century ago.
I read this book within the last few weeks. I was shocked to find out that the BLUEs actually existed. I ended up googling quite a bit because I was really curious about what was real in the book. The more I looked, the more amazing the story was.
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Old 07-30-2020, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Born + raised SF Bay; Tyler, TX now WNY
8,491 posts, read 4,735,625 times
Reputation: 8409
“A Renegade History of the United States” by Thaddeus Russell, which explores the role of people outside of polite society in expanding freedoms and their tensions with the establishment and institutions. Fascinating stuff.
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Old 07-30-2020, 06:16 PM
Status: "I don't understand. But I don't care, so it works out." (set 5 days ago)
 
35,620 posts, read 17,953,728 times
Reputation: 50641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayvenne View Post
I read this book within the last few weeks. I was shocked to find out that the BLUEs actually existed. I ended up googling quite a bit because I was really curious about what was real in the book. The more I looked, the more amazing the story was.
Me too. I'm very nearly done reading, and am amazed about this population. I've always been really interested in Appalachia, during the depression, and can't believe I missed this compelling story.
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Old 07-30-2020, 07:44 PM
 
Location: prescott az
6,957 posts, read 12,058,216 times
Reputation: 14245
I am reading non-fiction, "Influenza: The hundred year hunt fo cure the deadliest disease in history." This came out in 2018 with dire warnings about any new influenza that might occur. It's written in an easy to understand way by an ER doc, Jeremy Brown, MD. Was he clairvoyant? Did he know what was coming? Perhaps.
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Old 07-31-2020, 08:25 AM
 
Location: East Coast
4,249 posts, read 3,722,770 times
Reputation: 6482
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZgarden View Post
I am reading non-fiction, "Influenza: The hundred year hunt fo cure the deadliest disease in history." This came out in 2018 with dire warnings about any new influenza that might occur. It's written in an easy to understand way by an ER doc, Jeremy Brown, MD. Was he clairvoyant? Did he know what was coming? Perhaps.
I have that sitting on my TBR shelf.

I am a bit surprised by people commenting that novels, movies, and nonfiction narratives about pandemics seem to be so prescient and how it's so uncanny that they were so spot-on. Well, of course. We already know how these things go. Epidemiologists have been saying these things forever. We know what happens in a pandemic, and that's why previously the government has taken steps to prepare and so simulation exercises. Anyone who knew anything about epidemiology knew this would happen at some point.

What is so dismaying is the number of people, particularly in the U.S. who refuse to believe it or take it seriously.
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Old 07-31-2020, 08:54 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,799,413 times
Reputation: 4925
Default Amusing ourselves to death

Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
I have that sitting on my TBR shelf.

I am a bit surprised by people commenting that novels, movies, and nonfiction narratives about pandemics seem to be so prescient and how it's so uncanny that they were so spot-on. Well, of course. We already know how these things go. Epidemiologists have been saying these things forever. We know what happens in a pandemic, and that's why previously the government has taken steps to prepare and so simulation exercises. Anyone who knew anything about epidemiology knew this would happen at some point.

What is so dismaying is the number of people, particularly in the U.S. who refuse to believe it or take it seriously.
Yes. Apparently we're (the West, the US) easily distracted.
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Old 07-31-2020, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Calgary, Canada
1,163 posts, read 1,236,618 times
Reputation: 1205
The Lost Empire: a Fargo adventure by Clive Cussler
Really enjoying these books, makes me really miss travelling
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Old 07-31-2020, 11:07 AM
 
10,501 posts, read 7,034,778 times
Reputation: 32344
Just finished The Lovely Bones. I'm amazed I've never read it before. So good.

Three in the hopper right now:

Speak, Memory, the autobiography of Nabakov. I consider Nabakov to be the greatest 20th Century writer, so it's fascinating to read about the forces that shaped his world view.

The Case For Space, by Zubrin. A real-world assessment about how the lower launch costs afforded by the new commercial era of space is opening up an amazing world of possibilities.

Deacon King Kong, by McBride. Too early into it to really give a recommendation. It's supposed to be wildly hilarious, so we'll see.
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Old 07-31-2020, 03:28 PM
 
2,149 posts, read 1,516,220 times
Reputation: 2488
The Ten Thousand by Harold Coyle
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Old 07-31-2020, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
11,479 posts, read 9,141,481 times
Reputation: 19660
Mike Bowditch #2

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