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Old 04-14-2021, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Northern California
130,099 posts, read 12,078,224 times
Reputation: 39012

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Just started "The Sparrow"
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Old 04-14-2021, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,252,678 times
Reputation: 3809
Quote:
Originally Posted by oeccscclhjhn View Post
^ Best read of the year so far. A great writer who keeps you interested and takes you along his road trips through the U.S.

Just started...
I bought A crack in the World years ago and still have not read. Thanks for the reminder. The Professor and the Madmen. One of my favorites. A movie out right now. I think on Amazon. I won’t watch. Not a Mel Gibson fan.
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Old 04-14-2021, 05:01 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,797,961 times
Reputation: 4925
Default A historical novel on little-known information

Chinese Brothers, American Sons, by Ed Shew, c2020, Earnshaw Books

Tens of thousands of men from southern China changed the course of American history with their tireless work in the California gold fields in the 1850s and their crucial contribution in the building of the first Transcontinental Railroad in the following decade. Chinese Brothers, American Sons tells the little-known story of these brave adventurers through the eyes of two brothers, Li Chang and Li Yu, who arrive in San Francisco in 1854 in search of the Gold Mountain. Their hope is to make some money to take back to China, but they also encounter violence and discrimination and, yes, American food.

This apocryphal tale celebrates and illuminates the struggles and achievements of a largely-ignored group in the rich history of the United States of America – the Cantonese men who conquered the toughest part of the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad – the tunnels through the granite of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Despite their efforts, Asian-Americans were the target of racism for a century beyond the opening of the railroad in 1869, and the poison has yet to fully disappear. The author’s own story, of trying to “fit in” to his hometown birthplace of St Louis, is one of the many rich strands to this broad narrative. But the story in the end is one of hope and triumph – the Chinese brothers are no longer invisible, they are now American sons.

Excellent writing on a little-known part of US history. Lots of heart, & information on the Chinese in the US, & working on the Transcontinental Railroad.
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Old 04-15-2021, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
11,479 posts, read 9,138,435 times
Reputation: 19660
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Old 04-16-2021, 02:02 AM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,384,743 times
Reputation: 30253
Finished Everything Everything by Nicola Yoon 3 days ago. Wow, I am stunned speechless!
I've read a few books in a row now that started out fine but had very disappointing ends. This one though shocked me. I started the book for a buddy read but didn't want to take it too slow so I finished half the book before going to bed one night. Highly recommend it if you like a YA book thrown in from time to time.


A Memory of Violets is okay so far. It could be much better if it didn't have the feel of a romance novel now and then. The writing is inconsistent and sometimes pretty shallow. I had hoped for more.


Also listening to Safe Haven by Nicholas Sparks. I really liked his books in my late teens and early twenties but now they are just too predictable. It's okay to listen to it but I don't know if I'm going to pick one of his books again.


Have a great weekend you all
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Old 04-16-2021, 02:00 PM
 
Location: New York Area
35,016 posts, read 16,972,291 times
Reputation: 30137
Default Story of My Life by Moshe Dayan

I just finished reading Story of My Life by Moshe Dayan. The book is fascinating.

I was quite familiar with the back-story of the Zionist settlement of what is now the State of Israel. I find the tale inspiring each time I read about it. He was born, if I remember correctly, around 1911 in Ottoman-empire controlled Palestine. He was one of the original Sabras, or Jews born in what is now Israel, that made it to national leadership.

He famously lost his eye in a military accident in the early 1940s. Nevertheless, his role in the 1948 and 1956 Wars was heroic and his role as Israel's Defense Minister in the 1967 rout of the Arab forces legendary. He does not come out looking so well in the 1973 War, but as he points out the international situation had decidedly tipped against Israel during that period. In 1967 Israel was still the darling of many of the countries in the world, though France had started shifting from being an ally of Israel to neutrality in favor of the Arabs. By then Algeria had gained independence and many of their people, along with other Arabs didn't hang around for the "fun." During the period between 1967 and 1973 the Soviet Union began adventuring in the area. Further, by 1973 world oil supplies had tightened, even before the "Arab oil embargo." Thus, Dayan's freedom of action was limited.

Dayan, as the author, obviously portrayed himself in the best light possible, certainly with regard to his limited discussion of his personal life. Other accounts do not paint a rosy picture. That being said, a leader in a country as embattled as Israel, and of a people who have had it as tough as the Jews, tend not to be saints.

On the positive side, he highlights his interest in archaeology and nature. The epilogue (spoiler alert) is particularly moving. I highly recommend this book.

Last edited by jbgusa; 04-16-2021 at 03:12 PM..
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Old 04-16-2021, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
3,827 posts, read 1,781,593 times
Reputation: 5004
Quote:
Originally Posted by miguel's mom View Post
Also listening to Safe Haven by Nicholas Sparks. I really liked his books in my late teens and early twenties but now they are just too predictable. It's okay to listen to it but I don't know if I'm going to pick one of his books again.
Have a great weekend you all
miguel's mom, I never read the book SafeHaven but saw the movie and liked it, sad though.

I've been reading Lana's War by Anita Abriel.


"Paris 1943: Lana Antanova is on her way to see her husband with the thrilling news that she is pregnant. But when she arrives at the convent where he teaches music, she’s horrified to see Gestapo officers execute him for hiding a Jewish girl in the piano.

A few months later, grieving both her husband and her lost pregnancy, Lana is shocked when she’s approached to join the resistance on the French Riviera. As the daughter of a Russian countess, Lana has the perfect background to infiltrate the émigré community of Russian aristocrats who socialize with German officers, including the man who killed her husband.

Lana’s cover story makes her the mistress of Guy Pascal, a wealthy Swiss industrialist and fellow resistance member, in whose villa in Cap Ferrat she lives. Together, they gather information on upcoming raids and help members of the Jewish community escape. Consumed by her work, she doesn’t expect to become attached to a young Jewish girl or wonder about the secrets held by the man whose house she shares. And as the Nazis’ deadly efforts intensify, her intention to protect those around her may put them all at risk instead."


https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/sh...063-lana-s-war

So far it's very suspenseful and good, but the romance part is lacking - feels forced and not quite believable.
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Old 04-17-2021, 02:23 AM
 
6,146 posts, read 4,504,012 times
Reputation: 13747
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
I bought A crack in the World years ago and still have not read. Thanks for the reminder. The Professor and the Madmen. One of my favorites. A movie out right now. I think on Amazon. I won’t watch. Not a Mel Gibson fan.
I'm not a Mel Gibson fan, either, but even so I gave this a try and it was worth it. The movie was good enough to make me want to read the book.
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Old 04-17-2021, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Middle of the valley
48,518 posts, read 34,815,517 times
Reputation: 73734
My audiobook right now is "The Subtle Art of Not Give a ****", which I am enjoying. Easy listen, no nonsense, lots of profanity.

My evening reading is Boehner's new book. Just started it, but it's not a dry political read at all.

Also, The World Without Us by Alan Weisman. Non-fiction, how the world would change if we all disappeared.
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Old 04-17-2021, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Indiana (USA)
74,112 posts, read 1,835,507 times
Reputation: 3167
Just picked up The Last Days of John Lennon by James Patterson
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