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Old 10-04-2021, 03:20 AM
Status: "I have read 26 books this year!!!" (set 10 hours ago)
 
449 posts, read 196,639 times
Reputation: 505

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Old 10-04-2021, 06:07 PM
 
Location: New York Area
35,045 posts, read 16,995,362 times
Reputation: 30178
Default The Earthbound Parent: How (and Why) to Raise Your Little Angels Without Religion by Richard A. Conn Jr.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
The Earthbound Parent: How (and Why) to Raise Your Little Angels Without Religion by Richard A. Conn Jr. At Page 70. It's thoroughly well written. I just as thoroughly disagree with just about every word of the book.
I'll admit to being biased towards the book It was written by someone whom I went to High School with and have always thoroughly admired

I finished this a while ago and forgot to finish the review. It's thoroughly well written. I just as thoroughly disagree with just about every word of the book. I went into reading the book with an open mind. The book makes strong arguments against organized religion, arguing, in effect, that G-d does not exist. He goes on to explain his views that teaching religion is harmful as it encourages ignorance and fallacious beliefs at best and violence, even rape and murder at worst. His tone is sometimes mocking, referring to "Santa Claus, Easter Bunny, Quo and Qua" repeatedly. His argument, ultimately, is that the good aspects of religion, such as moral and ethical codes, are embedded in common and statutory law.

On Rosh Hashonah, I went to synagogue. The congregation was filled with orderly and educated people, most of whom are part of and/or have raised good families. These people are in many respects pillars of the community. I don't agree with the author's views on G-d. Even assuming I did agree or was uncertain, i.e. agnostic, I see no reason to uproot a system that has produced positive results.

The author uses examples from radical Islam and from the Crusades to make the case that religion is a toxic force. What he doesn't do is evaluate its positive impacts as well.
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Old 10-05-2021, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Oldham
182 posts, read 104,522 times
Reputation: 269
After my last read, I really don't think sci-fi is for me. I'm now reading Raven Black by Ann Cleeves (the first book in the Shetland series).
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Old 10-05-2021, 06:21 PM
 
316 posts, read 303,925 times
Reputation: 489
I had to give up on "My Heart is a Chainsaw". I had high hopes for it, as I loved the horror/slasher movies when I was a teen. This supposed homage to the genre was dreadfully boring.

So I moved on to "Good as Dead", which is a quick read centered around a woman whose husband was killed in a hit-and-run accident. There is a cover-up involved and the story is told from a number of alternating viewpoints. I anticipate finishing this in another day.
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Old 10-05-2021, 08:20 PM
Status: "I have read 26 books this year!!!" (set 10 hours ago)
 
449 posts, read 196,639 times
Reputation: 505
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Old 10-05-2021, 10:33 PM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,386,066 times
Reputation: 30253
I just finished the audio version of John Kare Raake's The Ice about an expedition to the North Pole which was really interesting. The stakes the different countries claim as well as a little bit crime story thrown in. 5 stars from me!


Afterwards I started Lucinda Riley's Seven Sisters. Absolutely far-fetched. I had to turn it off after 45 minutes. I just couldn't believe there can be so much rubbish put into such a short time


I'm glad I found Still Life by Louise Penny in our online library. This one was a very cozy murder story. The surrounding landscape, town, country life were described wonderfully. Made me want to go on vacation there...

Now I'm listening to Catherine Steadman's Something in the Water which is really interesting, intriguing and I can't wait to get back into the car to go on listening


As for real reading :
The Guernsey Literary and Potatoe Peel Pie Society was really really good! 5 stars again.


Now I'm reading The Dead and the Gone, sequel to Life as we knew it by Susan Pfeffer. It's far far far away from the first book. I just keep reading because I like the topic characters are shallow, most things are unbelievable and it's really dragging. Maybe it's just me or the other climate fiction books I've read before were really much better.
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Old 10-06-2021, 12:30 AM
Status: "I have read 26 books this year!!!" (set 10 hours ago)
 
449 posts, read 196,639 times
Reputation: 505
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Old 10-06-2021, 06:32 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,932,925 times
Reputation: 7237
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
I'll admit to being biased towards the book It was written by someone whom I went to High School with and have always thoroughly admired

I finished this a while ago and forgot to finish the review. It's thoroughly well written. I just as thoroughly disagree with just about every word of the book. I went into reading the book with an open mind. The book makes strong arguments against organized religion, arguing, in effect, that G-d does not exist. He goes on to explain his views that teaching religion is harmful as it encourages ignorance and fallacious beliefs at best and violence, even rape and murder at worst. His tone is sometimes mocking, referring to "Santa Claus, Easter Bunny, Quo and Qua" repeatedly. His argument, ultimately, is that the good aspects of religion, such as moral and ethical codes, are embedded in common and statutory law.

On Rosh Hashonah, I went to synagogue. The congregation was filled with orderly and educated people, most of whom are part of and/or have raised good families. These people are in many respects pillars of the community. I don't agree with the author's views on G-d. Even assuming I did agree or was uncertain, i.e. agnostic, I see no reason to uproot a system that has produced positive results.

The author uses examples from radical Islam and from the Crusades to make the case that religion is a toxic force. What he doesn't do is evaluate its positive impacts as well.
Thank you for a thoughtful, respectful review. I really appreciate it when people share the "why" behind their recommendation or non-recommendation.
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Old 10-06-2021, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Fiorina "Fury" 161
3,527 posts, read 3,731,599 times
Reputation: 6601


With Nirvana back in the news over the controversy in regard to the cover photo on their Nevermind album, I decided to bump up, ahead of schedule, a revisiting of Charles R. Cross's Heavier Than Heaven (2001), a biography of Kurt Cobain. I first read it circa 2005, and it is exactly as I remembered it: a five-star read! It is so good. So, so good. This time around, I tried to approach the book as if I was someone who didn't already know the band, the songs, the deeps cuts, et al., to see if it would be as easily readable to a person unfamiliar with any of it. I don't think that is possible, as knowing the songs already and understanding Nirvana's impact on rock-music history, then and now, is going to be helpful, providing for less back-end research and the like.

Cross is an excellent writer and the continuity with which he pens is top-notch, writing in a music-magazine style, but in full-length book form. He was the first music journalist to do a cover story on Nirvana and is fan of the band, and it shows. But with that, as he states in the 2019 forward of the updated and expanded edition, he intentionally kept his first-person narratives out of the book, and that is one of the reasons I thought it was a page-turner the first time I read it, because there are no sidebars that distract the from story as a result. None. It's all about Cobain's story.

As is often the case with things written about Kurt Cobain, it is not a light read in terms of content, as it deals with heady topics: depression, substance abuse, failed relationships, artistic expression that may be seen as disturbing, and ultimately, suicide. It's within this context, though, that Cross treats his subject at hand - and the subjects surrounding him - not as mere characters or caricatures, but as they are: real people.

Cross was the right author for this biography. I will have to check out his other books as well.
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Old 10-07-2021, 06:12 PM
Status: "I have read 26 books this year!!!" (set 10 hours ago)
 
449 posts, read 196,639 times
Reputation: 505
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