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Old 09-02-2022, 02:05 AM
 
Location: Mission District, San Francisco
5,111 posts, read 3,184,376 times
Reputation: 6771

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Taming of the Shrew, William Shakespeare. I haven't read one of his plays since high school, and even then I just looked at the SparkNotes online to pass all the quizzes. But I'm clearing out my book backlog now so I can go book-shopping again, and I found a tattered old copy of this play I think I got at a garage sale years ago.

I'm enjoying it so far. Sly, the proudly unambitious drunk, is a fun character in the intro. The dialogue between Bianca, her suitor, and her skeptical sister is amusing.
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Old 09-02-2022, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Vermont
6,623 posts, read 2,813,524 times
Reputation: 12184
Finished "Into the Water" by Paula Hawkins (ok), started "The Guest List" by Lucy Foley...

in the midst of "The Vegetable Gardener's Bible" by Edward Smith. Gonna set up a raised bed for next summer. long story. You guys know my failure with the elevated bed. and with the grow bags, though I will use them for smaller plantings next season as well.
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Old 09-02-2022, 06:57 AM
 
28,689 posts, read 12,255,768 times
Reputation: 44133
Quote:
Originally Posted by miguel's mom View Post
Just finished Winterland by Kim Faber (audio version). Solid crime story, likeable charakters, well drawn story line, nice twists and turns where you don't expect what comes next.


My next audio book is A Man called Ove by Frederic Backman - I'm only 10 minutes in and I already don't like Ove. Backman is really really good at this!
Oh you're so right - Beckman is really really good at this! Curious as to how you feel later. ;D
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Old 09-02-2022, 01:34 PM
Status: "Ya gotta' believe!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: New York Area
28,750 posts, read 12,210,265 times
Reputation: 23437
I just finished reading Benjamin Rush: Patriot and Physician by Alyn Brodsky. I am giving the book four stars on Goodreads only because I think chronological order, and more frequent listing of years as well as calendar dates would have helped readers. I am a fanatic of the subject of chronology.

I am a bit of a history buff and have often wondered about Benjamin Rush's role in history. He comes up prominently both as a doctor and as a patriot. I suppose I first learned of him in the context of his reuniting two former Presidents, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson as friends after their famous falling out.

His role and importance is greatly under-recognized. As a doctor he was very much a man of his times, and espoused treatments such as bloodletting that proved counterproductive. However, he can be regarded as a father of both preventative medicine and psychiatry. His role as a patriot is also under-appreciated. He was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and had a major role in fostering Thomas Paine's Common Sense. This pamphlet electrified the colonies.

To its credit, the book was not a hagiography. It highlighted Rush's constant conflicts with others that hampered both his reputation and reputation. I suppose it could be said that he traveled in an etherial crowd, all people with strong personalities. He clashed with the likes of George Washington, not to mention others in the medical establishment. Highly religious, he kept jumping around among three or four sects of Christianity. Perhaps two letters of condolence, on from John Adams, one from Thomas Jefferson sum in up best:


Adams wrote to Richard (Rush, one of Benjamin's sons) on 5 May 1813:
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Adams
In what terms can I address you? There are none that can express my sympathy with you and your family, or my own personal feel. ins on the loss of your excellent father. There is not another person out of my own family, who can die, in whom my personal happiness can be so deeply affected. The world would pronounce me extravagant and no man would apologize for me if I should say that in the estimation of unprejudiced philosophy, he has done more good in this world than Franklin or Washington.
Thomas Jefferson's letter of 27 May 1813 to John Adams upon learning of the passing of their mutual friend:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Jefferson
Another of our friends of seventy-six is gone, my dear Sir, another of the co-signers of the Independence of our country. And a better man than Rush could not have left us, more benevolent, more learned, of finer genius, or more honest.
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Old 09-03-2022, 05:54 AM
 
633 posts, read 237,354 times
Reputation: 779
FYI -- 3 (hopefully winners) to be on the lookout coming out for September:

Lucy by the Sea by Elizabeth Strout

The Winners by Fredrik Backman

The Marriage Portrait by Maggie O'Farrell

Last edited by Firehorse66; 09-03-2022 at 06:02 AM..
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Old 09-03-2022, 05:58 AM
 
633 posts, read 237,354 times
Reputation: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I just started Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. Fingers crossed that it is a good one because I've read three duds in a row!
Hi pinetreelover! Always interested to find out about the good AND the bad. Which books did you feel were duds? Lessons in Chemistry is on my TBR list, please report back on your thoughts! Thanks!
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Old 09-03-2022, 11:07 AM
 
9,395 posts, read 6,043,941 times
Reputation: 20485
I am reading Ann Rule’s You Belong To Me. Fast, interesting true story, but I hope I don’t end up going down a rabbit hole of reading all her true crime books. The true crime books I’ve read have been fascinating for portrayals of really evil people and of forensics work. Still, they tend to be a bit depressing. I reserved one more more recent true crime book from another author but need to pick something very, very different and preferably fictional, to clear my mind of thinking too long about sickos.

There seem to be more and more sickos being spawned, developed, and enabled all the time.
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Old 09-04-2022, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
17,497 posts, read 29,463,749 times
Reputation: 25466
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I just finished The Boy at the Top of the Mountain by John Boyne. I don't even know what to say because I feel like so many people loved it, but I found it really disturbing. The premise is that a young boy is orphaned and ends up living with his aunt who is a housekeeper at Hitler's mountain home. Hitler is portrayed (at least initially) as an eccentric, yet often kind, mentor to this young, impressionable boy. There are some gratuitously violent events that seem to be placed to balance out the narrative, but they are even more disturbing that this very distorted view of Adolf Hitler.

Oh - and this was a Young Adult book so young, impressionable readers can read about a young, impressionable boy getting groomed by a mass murderer.





I had just finished The Boy a few nights ago,


It was a good book, and yes, disturbing none the less,
however, I am glad I took a chance with this book, and read it, and I did enjoy it immensley.
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Old 09-06-2022, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
45,466 posts, read 56,770,785 times
Reputation: 82040
The Housemaid, Freida McFadden. I had to throw in the towel halfway through. I read before I go to sleep, and this book was upsetting me too much. It’s psychological thriller, so if you enjoy that sort of thing, you might like it.
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Old 09-06-2022, 10:48 PM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,601 posts, read 5,114,277 times
Reputation: 30228
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
Oh you're so right - Beckman is really really good at this! Curious as to how you feel later. ;D

Absolutely loved A Man called Ove! 5 stars. I really cried at the end Backman is so good! He really had me not liking Ove from the beginning but as the story went on he showed, that the first gllimpse is often not enough and that looks / behaviours can be deceiving. What a wonderful story.


Unfortunately this and My Grandmother asked me to tell you she's sorry are the only two Backman books available on the platform I use


My next audio book will be the Germany version of Wolf Totem by Jiang Rong. Something completely new for me. Looking forward to it.
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