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Old 02-15-2024, 07:18 PM
 
Location: New York Area
35,002 posts, read 16,964,237 times
Reputation: 30109

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Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
A historical account of early Antarctic exploration: Hoosh by Jason C. Anthony.

"Hoosh" is/was a porridge put together with whatever ingredients were available, usually penguin or seal meat (sometimes dog or pony), melted snow, and maybe crumbled biscuits for bulk. Why these men embarked on these journeys in the late 1800s/early 1900s boggles my mind. The conditions were so bad: frostbite, scurvy, starvation, no communication, etc.

It wouldn't even interest me in modern day, with all the advancements in tools, gear, and foods.
A bit off-topic, but a few years ago I read The Impossible First: From Fire to Ice—Crossing Antarctica Alone by Colin O'Brady.

There is admittedly some controversy about the book and the author. The February 2020 issue of National Geographic (link) questions his claim to be a first, or to even qualify. See Aaron Teasdale’s exposé in National Geographic. Australian polar explorer Eric Philips, cofounder and president of the International Polar Guides Association is quoted as stating: “This wasn’t some Last Great Polar Journey. Rather, it was a truncated route that was a first in only a very limited way.”There are two major bases; 1) that Mr. O'Brady (and another adventurer, Louis Rudd, whom Mr. O'Grady was informally racing) took the route which included the use of the Leverett Glacier SPoT “road” ("SPoT", for South Pole Overland Traverse); and 2) that Norwegian adventurer Borge Ousland had previously crossed a greater distance in Antarctica, solo and without resupply. Spoiler alert here: Mr. O'Grady later wrote a sixteen-page demand for retraction of the National Geographic piece (link). Reading with an "attorney's set of eyes" (not definitive obviously) I place far more credibility in the O'Brady demand for retraction than in the National Geographic article. The NG piece reads more like a "hit-piece" or worse, click-bate. Its author seems to have an incomprehensible agenda or bias.
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Old 02-16-2024, 01:31 AM
 
3,728 posts, read 2,551,518 times
Reputation: 6755
The Invention of the Jewish People (Shlomo Sand. 2009)

A history of the Jewish diaspora's growing, nationalistic self-awareness.
Sand basically asserts that Jews saw themselves as individual religious minorities for centuries (ie- Germans who practiced Judaism). But in the 1800s, the diaspora began reevaluating itself as a single scattered, but connected, ethnoreligious nation.
Interesting subject, but kinda dry writing..
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Old 02-16-2024, 09:28 AM
 
Location: New York Area
35,002 posts, read 16,964,237 times
Reputation: 30109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Babe_Ruth View Post
The Invention of the Jewish People (Shlomo Sand. 2009)

A history of the Jewish diaspora's growing, nationalistic self-awareness.
Sand basically asserts that Jews saw themselves as individual religious minorities for centuries (ie- Germans who practiced Judaism). But in the 1800s, the diaspora began reevaluating itself as a single scattered, but connected, ethnoreligious nation.
Interesting subject, but kinda dry writing..
Thanks for calling my attention to this. I doubt I'll read it given your "review" but I agree with the overall thesis as described.

I want to continue this discussion but What book are you reading? is the wrong place. I have started a new thread on this subject, Growth of Jewish Nationalism in Diaspora, and Relationship to Zionism.
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Old 02-16-2024, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
4,040 posts, read 2,906,913 times
Reputation: 38778
My next book club read is A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving. The Amazon synopsis says:

In the summer of 1953, two eleven-year-old boys—best friends—are playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire. One of the boys hits a foul ball that kills the other boy's mother. The boy who hits the ball doesn't believe in accidents; Owen Meany believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is extraordinary.
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Old 02-17-2024, 05:02 AM
 
4,723 posts, read 4,413,722 times
Reputation: 8481
I finished The Bird Hotel, and thought it was superb. The writing, and the story line, were so beautifully done. I highly recommend it. I did have one or two quibbles with it , which have more to do with editing . I am surprised at that so I have to say it could very well be me who did not read something correctly. The points are trivial but they didn't make sense.
I digress though, as these points did not have any impact on the book or my enjoyment of it. I still give the book 5 stars out of 5.

I just started The Cider House Rules, by John Irving. Funny that the post right above this is also John Irving.
One daughter just read Cider house and said it is one of her all time favorites, and my other daughter has mentioned Owen Meany as being one of her favorites.
FWIW, I read Garp when it first came out and adored it. I read The Hotel New Hampshire last year and while I enjoyed it, I found it tedious and did not love it.
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Old 02-17-2024, 07:16 AM
Status: "I don't understand. But I don't care, so it works out." (set 2 days ago)
 
35,591 posts, read 17,927,273 times
Reputation: 50622
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayvenne View Post
I finished The Bird Hotel, and thought it was superb. The writing, and the story line, were so beautifully done. I highly recommend it. I did have one or two quibbles with it , which have more to do with editing . I am surprised at that so I have to say it could very well be me who did not read something correctly. The points are trivial but they didn't make sense.
I digress though, as these points did not have any impact on the book or my enjoyment of it. I still give the book 5 stars out of 5.

I just started The Cider House Rules, by John Irving. Funny that the post right above this is also John Irving.
One daughter just read Cider house and said it is one of her all time favorites, and my other daughter has mentioned Owen Meany as being one of her favorites.
FWIW, I read Garp when it first came out and adored it. I read The Hotel New Hampshire last year and while I enjoyed it, I found it tedious and did not love it.
I love John Irving, when he's at his best. He can certainly veer off, though!

I read Gsrp when it first came out and adored it, too, although at the time I was a teenager and really couldn't understand the depth. I re-read it, now published with a new foreword by Irving, that gives it even greater depth. If you loved it the first time, I would recommend re-reading it.

And also, A Son of the Circus. So many unforgettable characters, and hilariously absurd scenes.
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Old 02-18-2024, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Lakewood NJ/Murrells Inlet SC/ N. Naples FL/Swainton NJ
4,026 posts, read 6,540,797 times
Reputation: 3531
Black House, Stephen King.
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Old 02-18-2024, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
18,462 posts, read 31,617,011 times
Reputation: 28001
I have just started "Cutting for Stone" Abraham Verghese.
I am on page 78, and so far, I am not really enjoying it, but will continue on and see what happens.
A little too descriptive and some words I don't even know the meaning but can get the jest of it.
He also uses the Indian, or another language for a certain phrase or descriptive which I find un-necessary, and can't even pronounce. Also, the main character "Sister Mary Joseph Praise", he repeats her name numerous times, as opposed to saying simply "Sister Mary", nope, it is "Sister Mary Joseph Praise". Read that 37 times in 3 chapters and come talk to me. Ugh!! LOL
Also it is a lot of medical things as it is about surgeons, and I'm not really interested in anything medical, (why am I reading this then?, I ask myself) and some things that I thought were gruesome, well, to me at least, I had to really skim thru. (I have a weak stomach)

I am reading this book because I did read his other book The Covenant of Water" and really enjoyed that, all 715 pages of it. I actually feel that was an accomplishment that I had made. At first I saw how thick the book was and thought, OMG, I will never finish that, hence, a month later, I was wanting the book to continue on.....
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Old 02-18-2024, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Orlando, FL, US
2 posts, read 380 times
Reputation: 10
I'm reading the book "The Lost Ways" by Claude Davis is a survival guide that has received mixed reviews since its release. You can read it, I think you will definitely like it.
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Old 02-19-2024, 11:56 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,795 posts, read 2,797,347 times
Reputation: 4925
Default An Rx for melancholy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nightcrawler View Post
I have just started "Cutting for Stone" Abraham Verghese.
...
Read his The tennis partner for book club. Interesting look @ interns, semi-pro tennis, the pressures on both sets, addictions & related dangers. It's set in El Paso, TX - added interest for me. I'll take a look @ his others - are they all medicine/doctor related? That's my impression, skimming catalogs & reviews.
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