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Old 02-28-2011, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,809,592 times
Reputation: 28897

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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I was blown away by The Life of Pi. I didn't expect to like it but it engaged me with the very first page. However, I would really like to know what you think of the ending when you've finished the book. I don't want to post any spoilers.
I know that everyone has said that it's a "WHOA!" ending, but I can't even imagine what's going to happen. I'm 150 or so pages in now, and loving it. Totally not my type of book -- TOTALLY! NOT! -- yet I'm enthralled by it.

I'll let you know what I think of the ending when I get there. Very busy week coming up, and it's the type of book that I don't want to end, so it may end up lasting longer than it should.
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Old 02-28-2011, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,893 posts, read 18,175,929 times
Reputation: 62765
I'm now about halfway through "My Life in France" by Julia Child.

I did not, I repeat DID NOT, want to read this book but I promised a friend that I would and she is in big trouble now because the book makes me so hungry.

I have never cared much for Julia Child and, thus, I never made any effort to "know" her. I was certainly wrong in my assessment of her.

For one thing, her writing style is delicious. Yeah, there's a pun in that but she really did write very well. Reading the book in like having a comfy chat with a very interesting, interested, well-informed, humorous person.

I envy her relationship with her husband, Paul. I envy her ability to take things as they came and to enjoy every single moment of life. Her willingness to explore, meet new people, try new things really filled her life to its capacity.

She was obviously a person who was blessed with a joyous soul.

Naturally, every page has food mentioned: the selection of, the preparation of and the eating of........

I'm afraid my growling stomach scares my cats.....not that I am going to eat them but they are not used to such sounds. She mentions the preparation of Dover sole so often that I must confess to getting on the net and ordering a slew of it from Omaha Steaks. They have the best Dover sole I have ever eaten.

Truly, this book is a romp through a few years in her life and it's totally enjoyable. I'm so surprised how much I like it.

I, myself, don't like to cook. I do like to bake, though. However if you are in the mood for roasted Cornish hen stuffed with wild rice let me know. That is one of the few things I am known for.
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Old 02-28-2011, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,809,592 times
Reputation: 28897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I'm now about halfway through "My Life in France" by Julia Child.

I did not, I repeat DID NOT, want to read this book but I promised a friend that I would and she is in big trouble now because the book makes me so hungry.

I have never cared much for Julia Child and, thus, I never made any effort to "know" her. I was certainly wrong in my assessment of her.

For one thing, her writing style is delicious. Yeah, there's a pun in that but she really did write very well. Reading the book in like having a comfy chat with a very interesting, interested, well-informed, humorous person.

I envy her relationship with her husband, Paul. I envy her ability to take things as they came and to enjoy every single moment of life. Her willingness to explore, meet new people, try new things really filled her life to its capacity.

She was obviously a person who was blessed with a joyous soul.

Naturally, every page has food mentioned: the selection of, the preparation of and the eating of........

I'm afraid my growling stomach scares my cats.....not that I am going to eat them but they are not used to such sounds. She mentions the preparation of Dover sole so often that I must confess to getting on the net and ordering a slew of it from Omaha Steaks. They have the best Dover sole I have ever eaten.

Truly, this book is a romp through a few years in her life and it's totally enjoyable. I'm so surprised how much I like it.

I, myself, don't like to cook. I do like to bake, though. However if you are in the mood for roasted Cornish hen stuffed with wild rice let me know. That is one of the few things I am known for.




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Old 02-28-2011, 09:16 AM
 
Location: not where you are
8,737 posts, read 9,402,697 times
Reputation: 8281
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post




Second that.

Think I might have to read the book even though I could have written those same words, as to how I felt about JC at one point.
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Old 02-28-2011, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Somewhere out there
9,616 posts, read 12,860,407 times
Reputation: 3767
Default Reading "The Gun" by C. J. Chivers

This is a political "thriller" in a way, since it wades without pretense or bias through the history of manually fast-firing and then fully automatic firearms beginning with the Gatling in the American Civil Wr, and it's expansion into the European theater by Napolean's forces, the Brits in their relentless colonialism, and others. Then it covers the Maxim machine gun, designed by the ego-maniac Hiram Maxim, which fundamentally altered the entrenched philosophies of a "glorious war", evolving into mass murder (what else would we call it in the end?) that men seem to embrace in their endless idiocies: i.e.: massed armies at war.

About the end of WW-II, the Germans had dabbled in small handy firearms (handier than a full-sized one-at-a-time battle rifle), and then the Russians, in their paranoia-driven push for a national identity that could not be threatened by other military interlopers (us; the nasty old NATO West...), pushed Kalashnikov (and so many others, it seems...) to design teh now-inffamous AK-47 (Avtomat of Kalashnikov, 1947).

Then follows a historty of how this lone invention has fundamentally altered world politics, the influence of the Soviet Bloc on developing countries, and the dadcUS response (the initially defective and unsafe M-16 that we debuted far too early in Vietnam, at the expense of the lives of many young American men...) (NOTE: the current M4 version of the standard American battle rifle is better, but not by a lot...)

This is not a technical documentary, rather, this is an amazing anthology of how man's greed and ego can take the lead and create a system of thinking and related tools to alter history. Fascinating.
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Old 02-28-2011, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,809,592 times
Reputation: 28897
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRosa View Post
Second that.

Think I might have to read the book even though I could have written those same words, as to how I felt about JC at one point.
I had no knowledge of Julia Child, really, beyond the SNL skit and the line "Fiiiiiirst you take the biiiiiird..."

Then that blog came out, upon which the Julia and Julie (or Julie and Julia, I don't know the order) book was "written." I couldn't get beyond page 25 or so, but I got interested in Julia, so I bought My Life in France. What a fabulous book. It made me fall in love with Julia Child. She's really a very funny and warm lady.
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Old 02-28-2011, 03:00 PM
 
13,499 posts, read 18,056,071 times
Reputation: 37885
How to Live Well: A life of Montaigne in one question and twenty attempts at an answer. Sarah Bakewell. First, this is not a conventional biography by a long shot, as it mines M's Essays in a really entertaining way to give not only a conventional narrative of his life, but a wonderfully informal, speculative, chatty picture of the man. And this, of course, is rather how M. himself wrote. This biography received significant praise from many reviewers, and I am finding that it is well-deserved.

Levant: Splendour and catastrophe on the Mediterranean. Philip Mansel. Although this is a non-fiction book, I think if you have enjoyed Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet, you may find this will please you. It is essentially a history of the three cosmopolitan cities of the eastern Med: Alexandria, Smyrna and Beirut, but it is laced with enough gossipy anecdotes to remind you constantly of the world of Durrell's books. The book shifts back and forth among the cities, but I had no problem picking out the chapters on one city and following them through to the end, and then beginning again with the next city.....I just preferred to read it this way.
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Old 03-03-2011, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
23,028 posts, read 28,704,069 times
Reputation: 32299
I'm finishing up J. Randy Taraborrelli's unauthorized bio Miss Ross/bio of Diana Ross. Never a boring moment!

At her concerts, when she'd sing Reach Out and Touch Someone, she'd oftentimes go out into the audience to touch people. At one concert, oops! she touched a very touchy person:

"Don't touch me! Go to hell!" he shouted, with the microphone in her hand! Lol!

After reading this book, I'd do the same if I had the opportunity, but I'd use much stronger language!

If you like reading about selfish, greedy, narcissistic, dictatorial Diva's, this is the book for you!
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Old 03-03-2011, 12:24 PM
 
1,780 posts, read 2,341,128 times
Reputation: 616
I love a great novel. However, right now I am more fixed on stuff that feeds the brain. I have been reading the fallowing:

Mental floss history of the world
The World is Flat
The Ancient Egyptians
The Collected What if?
New Age Encyclopedia: A Mind Body Spirit Reference Guide
... and a few other general reference books.


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Old 03-03-2011, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,618 posts, read 86,464,984 times
Reputation: 36636
James Galvin's "The Meadow". About the old west, a book and an author that deserved to be a lot better known than they are. Galvin writes mostly poetry, and this haunting prose is pretty close to poetry with justified margins.
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