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Old 03-17-2011, 05:47 AM
 
1,828 posts, read 3,458,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
Have you -- or anyone on this forum -- read Incendiary, also by Chris Cleave? It was written BEFORE Little Bee and is just now getting popular because of Little Bee's success.

It's in the form of one long letter which is the reason that I haven't yet bought it. But I know I will... eventually... or sooner.
No, I never heard of that one. I'll check the library today to see if they have it. Thanks!!
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Old 03-17-2011, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Lindo View Post
No, I never heard of that one. I'll check the library today to see if they have it. Thanks!!
I knew I'd cave sooner rather than later. I just ordered Incendiary.

I also ordered Max and the Cats, which many say was the basis for Life of Pi.

And, speaking of Life of Pi, I think I'll give in and order Beatrice and Virgil, also authored by Yann Martel. But I'm going to wait on that one. For a bit, at least.
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Old 03-18-2011, 06:48 AM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,183,744 times
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Living and Dying in Zazen: Five Zen masters of modern Japan by Arthur Braverman. Far more interesting than previous biographies of Buddhist teachers that I have read, which I found had an austere remoteness in their style, or perhaps it was in their attitude toward the subject. And this book didn't swerve in the opposite direction, that of gushing adoration, which mars the biographies of modern Christian figures. As copy of the back cover says "The deification of Zen teachers by their followers has been a problematic issue in American Zen..." and it goes on to say that this book provides a "healthy antidote" presenting the four men and one woman within the context of their personal lives and their changing culture.

Human Chain, by Seamus Heaney. Heaney is a world famous Irish poet, winner of a well-deserved Nobel Prize, and I have enjoyed his past work that I have read - most especially his Poems from 1965 - 1975. However, I am halfway through this last collection of his, and, thus far, have been surprised to find that there has not been a single poem that I have felt an emotional connexion with. These poems are very spare, but I have read much Japanese poetry in translation that is equally so, and not failed to feel a connexion.

Have a copy of Awesome Nightfall beside my reading chair, which I have been slowly reading. These are the poems of Saigyo translated by William R. Lafleur. Saigyo was a 12th century samurai who lived in a turbulent era of Japanese history, and abandoned his military career and became a monk. Contrary to my experience so far with Heaney's latest work, I have checked several of Saigyo's that have struck a chord in me.
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Old 03-18-2011, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Maine
461 posts, read 796,561 times
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Just read Meredith Baxter's Untied, pretty good read. Working on Freedom by Jonathan Franzen - kind of have to force myself, hope it gets better.
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Old 03-18-2011, 08:07 AM
 
2,319 posts, read 4,801,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by entyss View Post
Working on Freedom by Jonathan Franzen - kind of have to force myself, hope it gets better.
Please let us know what you think. It's on my to-read list. I've read so many duds recently that I'll skip it if it's blah.
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Old 03-18-2011, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
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I finished Picturing the Wreck by Dani Shapiro. It was okay. It's not one of my favorites among her books but it has a great ending that leaves the reader feeling good.

I'm almost finished with The Dressmaker of Khair Khana by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon. It's a true story about a young woman in Kabul during the Taliban years who manages to support her 10 brothers and sisters by learning to sew and hiring neighborhood women (over 30 of them) to produce dresses and pant suits for the tailor shops. She is quite a tenacious young lady and manages to provide a source of income for many families. It's quite exciting, too, because she has to dodge the Talibs and does a beautiful job of doing it. It really makes me hungry for naan....the Afghan flat bread. I love it. The author, who wrote this woman's story while on a break from working on her Harvard MBA, is an excellent writer. Everything is very clear, well paced and descriptive. I like the pace of her writing. It's a good book!
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Old 03-18-2011, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I finished Picturing the Wreck by Dani Shapiro. It was okay. It's not one of my favorites among her books but it has a great ending that leaves the reader feeling good.

I'm almost finished with The Dressmaker of Khair Khana by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon. It's a true story about a young woman in Kabul during the Taliban years who manages to support her 10 brothers and sisters by learning to sew and hiring neighborhood women (over 30 of them) to produce dresses and pant suits for the tailor shops. She is quite a tenacious young lady and manages to provide a source of income for many families. It's quite exciting, too, because she has to dodge the Talibs and does a beautiful job of doing it. It really makes me hungry for naan....the Afghan flat bread. I love it. The author, who wrote this woman's story while on a break from working on her Harvard MBA, is an excellent writer. Everything is very clear, well paced and descriptive. I like the pace of her writing. It's a good book!
That sounds very interesting. I haven't been reading much. I've been having terrible migraines - I think there is something with the windy days and the air pressure - I haven't had such migraines in years.

But I did finish Ruler of the Realm, a second book in a series by Herbie Brennan. I read Fairy Wars years ago. I have had Ruler of the Realm and the 3rd book, The Purple Emperor for years now and hadn't read them. I came across them while I was cleaning up in a half-hearted, dizzy sort of way, and that seemed to be about all my head could handle.

It is very much like the Harry Potter books and I think that anyone who enjoyed the Harry Potter books, adult or child would enjoy these books.
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Old 03-18-2011, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
Reputation: 62766
I just started reading Amy and Isabelle by Elizabeth Strout. I loved Olive Kitteridge so much that I'm sure I will like this one.

I'm barely into it but I've already spotted her excellent character development.

I've always been a reader but I'm discovering such amazing authors in this forum. You folks have opened new doors for me with your discussions.

I received Why Sinatra Matters by Pete Hamill in the mail today. First, I am a rabid fan of Sinatra's and I always will be. Added to that is the fact that I am also a fan of Pete Hamill's. I look forward to reading this one.
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Old 03-19-2011, 12:27 PM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,385,004 times
Reputation: 30253
Rereading "Voyager" by Diana Gabaldon.
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Old 03-19-2011, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I just started reading Amy and Isabelle by Elizabeth Strout. I loved Olive Kitteridge so much that I'm sure I will like this one.

I'm barely into it but I've already spotted her excellent character development.
I loved Amy and Isabelle almost as much as Olive Kitteridge. Maybe more. No, a bit less. Maybe a bit more. OK, I loved them both -- I'm such a two-timer.

The one by Elizabeth Strout that I could not get through was Abide With Me. I couldn't get into the characters, didn't care for the story, the whole thing just didn't work for me at all, and I gave up somewhere between page 50 and page 75.
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