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Old 07-04-2011, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Telford, TN
1,065 posts, read 3,849,799 times
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I'm presently reading "A Clash of Kings" by George R.R. Martin.
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Old 07-04-2011, 04:04 PM
 
Location: New York City
74 posts, read 71,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I was surprised, too, because one of my favorite authors is Marcel Proust and that guy could strangle a horse with his verbosity.

On the other hand, I tried reading The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and became very bored with it early on and quit reading it. A couple of months later I gave it another try and could not put it down.

I think there are cases when we readers are just not in the mood to read certain types of books and after we snap out of the mood we enjoy the same books. I plan to give Collins' book another try later in the summer.
Earlier in this thread East of Eden by Steinbeck was mentioned. I have to say that there is such a disturbing rape scene in that book, that it haunts me years and years after reading it. I think that I need to stay away from too much realistic brutality in books. They stick with me more so than those in movies - or maybe it's just that most R rated movies aren't allow to show what a book can describe. Though I think Steinbeck is a great author, E of E was too much. The Grapes of Wrath is beautiful, but so, so sad!

But it is odd how we can all have such different literary tastes. For me, Collins is not the least bit too descriptive, though Dickens can really carry on for pages with description. Still, I love him, too.

The perfect example of readers' diverse interests is the fact that millions of people love the Twilight series, though I couldn't get past the first ten pages of any of those books - in English or Spanish!
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Old 07-04-2011, 04:56 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,476,031 times
Reputation: 14764
Quote:
Originally Posted by TribalCat View Post
Read these in June:

Berry, Steve ***** exciting!
- The Amber Room

Blackwell, Juliet *** fun
- Hexes and Hemlines

Carroll, Rick *** fun
- Hawaii’s Best Spooky Tales: The Original

Heckman, Victoria ** okay
- K.O.’d in Honolulu

Mayes, Frances ***** made me want to move to Tuscany
- Under the Tuscan Sun

Silva, Daniel ***** exciting
- The Rembrandt Affair

Reading these now:

Andrade, Carlos
- Ha’ena: Through the Eyes of the Ancestors

Malone, Nancy M.
- Walking a Literary Labyrinth: A Spirituality of Reading
These look like interesting reads! Thanks for sharing them with us! I think I will add them to my reservation list at the library.
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Old 07-04-2011, 05:01 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,476,031 times
Reputation: 14764
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
Has anybody ever read anything by the author Ivan Doig ? I have just started his book titled "the whistling season " and it is good so far but am really enjoying his books . If you have not had a chance to check him out do so .
I was thinking I had, but I just pulled up his book list on Wikipedia, and nothing stands out. I will check out a few and let you know what I thought.

Thanks for the recommend.
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Old 07-04-2011, 05:09 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,476,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewdrop93 View Post
...decided to go back in time and read Anna Karenina. It's taken me a little bit to get into it but I'm about 100 pages in now and have started to enjoy it. I usually try to go back and forth between old and new books - but I got sucked into some really enticing modern stuff!
I do the same thing! There was a time when I was locked into only reading works that were written more than 100 years before. And then I started reading the Top Ten best-selling novels from 1900 through 1907, and then had to go modern, again.

The Russian authors require diligence. I got hooked on Dostoyevski in high-school, after reading "The Brothers Karamazov" and followed that with "Crime and Punishment" -- it killed me trying to keep track of all the characters' names. I read Tolstoy's "War and Peace" and thought it the best book I'd ever read. If I was trapped on a desert island and could have only five books, that would be one I would select.
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Old 07-04-2011, 05:29 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,476,031 times
Reputation: 14764
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Time Baroness View Post
...I have to say that there is such a disturbing rape scene in that book, that it haunts me years and years after reading it. I think that I need to stay away from too much realistic brutality in books. They stick with me more so than those in movies - or maybe it's just that most R rated movies aren't allow to show what a book can describe.

But it is odd how we can all have such different literary tastes. For me, Collins is not the least bit too descriptive, though Dickens can really carry on for pages with description. Still, I love him, too.
I believe all of what you refer to involves the Quality of the descriptions. What a book can describe triggers your mind to think beyond the written work, if done well, so your imagination can visualize something much more compelling.

In a movie, you are engaged in observing, and imagining is usually left in the eaves, so to speak.

I believe Dickens (and others) were successful in describing because they gave pictures to let their readers imagine a scene they wouldn't otherwise imagine. The authors that describe too much that give the reader the mundane and the obvious, and isn't needed to progress the story. Those authors are just in love with their own voices.
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Old 07-04-2011, 05:31 PM
 
2,087 posts, read 4,253,623 times
Reputation: 2131
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Time Baroness View Post
Earlier in this thread East of Eden by Steinbeck was mentioned. I have to say that there is such a disturbing rape scene in that book, that it haunts me years and years after reading it. I think that I need to stay away from too much realistic brutality in books. They stick with me more so than those in movies - or maybe it's just that most R rated movies aren't allow to show what a book can describe. Though I think Steinbeck is a great author, E of E was too much. The Grapes of Wrath is beautiful, but so, so sad!

But it is odd how we can all have such different literary tastes. For me, Collins is not the least bit too descriptive, though Dickens can really carry on for pages with description. Still, I love him, too.

The perfect example of readers' diverse interests is the fact that millions of people love the Twilight series, though I couldn't get past the first ten pages of any of those books - in English or Spanish!
I mentioned East of Eden, and what I now find odd is: I don't recall the rape scene! What I remember from E of E was the concept of "Thou mayest" (probably inadequately paraphrased) toward the end of book.

I also liked the beginning (once again paraphrased from memory) "Kathleen was a monster.

Your experience with the Twilight series mirrors mine with the Harry Potter series.

I bought the first book, within days of it's initial release, at an airport bookstore to read while working an all-nighter from Washington Dulles to San Francisco Int.

I could not get past the lack of any knowledge pertaining to Magic and the authors seeming lack of interest in understanding The Laws of Magic.

The Law of Knowledge is generally accepted as the first Law of Magic!

I heard Rowlings writing style may have improved during the course of the series.

I ended up giving this book, very unfinished, to a young boy on the plane who was Overjoyed not only that this was his "first very own book", not just from the library, but that it was Harry Potter.

His mother shared with me, privately, that she had always made sure he had access to books and reading material, but that she could not afford new hardback books.

My guess is he still has this book or, hopefully, it is helping pay for college!

Let us never forget what a privilege it is to read for pleasure and to have access to ALL books.
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Old 07-04-2011, 05:44 PM
 
2,087 posts, read 4,253,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I believe all of what you refer to involves the Quality of the descriptions.

The authors that describe too much that give the reader the mundane and the obvious, and isn't needed to progress the story. Those authors are just in love with their own voices.
Oh my goodness! Can you say Jean M. Auel. Ayla this and Ayla that --- every time Ayla did Anything Jean M. Auel recapped, with mind-numbing repetition, exactly how she had done the exact same thing not only in earlier books but also in earlier Chapters! of the Same book.

For awhile I tried just reading past the redundant passages, but when one of Auels' books began with mastodons "doing it" I gave up.
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Old 07-04-2011, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,068 posts, read 10,086,802 times
Reputation: 1650
F Paul Wilson:

"It's official. The contract is signed. I'm going to write 3 more RJ novels set in the early 90s, between his arrival in NYC and THE TOMB. He'll develop his relationships with Abe and Julio, make mistakes as he learns the ropes and becomes the guy we meet later on. When they're done, THAT'S IT. You'll know everything I know about Jack and there'll be nothing left to tell."



I believe these will bridge the gap between the older Jack and the younger Jack.
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Old 07-05-2011, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,893 posts, read 18,175,929 times
Reputation: 62765
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
If you have not read Amy Tan's "Saving Fish from drowning " it is in my opinion one of her best so far .
I'm reading The Kitchen God's Wife. I read Saving Fish from Drowning last year. Amy Tan never disappoints me. I've even become so familiar with some of the American-Chinese sayings that I find I use some of them in conversation. Things like "best part" when talking about food servings.

"Best intentions" is another one. I realize they sound like regular sayings but the way there are used by the characters' mothers is different. I like the characters so much that I forget I am reading fiction. When the heroine in one of her books announces that she has MS I said "Oh no" outloud. I love her character development because it is always so clear and so human. There is always so much going on in the books and yet her books are so restful to me.
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