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Old 12-05-2011, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Vermont
11,758 posts, read 14,646,068 times
Reputation: 18523

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I just finished reading Dracula yesterday and I just downloaded Heart of Darkness, but I've barely started that.

They're both available for free download at the Kindle store.
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Old 12-05-2011, 03:11 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
8,711 posts, read 11,729,169 times
Reputation: 7604
I like to get several going at once . I just finished "Running with scissors" a week ago and it was a good read. Here's my current list:

The Book of Ruth

Invisible Monsters

American Music

Red Hook Road
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Old 12-05-2011, 04:17 PM
 
Location: New York City
74 posts, read 72,967 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I don't know what to read next. My dad had a small stroke and I need something I can concentrate on. I had planned to read Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger but it isn't a sequel to The Time Traveller's Wife, and I'm wondering if it is as engaging as the previous book. I need something that will grab my attention and not let my mind wander.
So sorry to hear about your dad. I loved Her Fearful Symmetry, loved, loved, loved it. I'm a big fan of Niffeneggar's anyway, she's a great inspiration to me as a writer, but HFS isn't exactly romantic like TTTW. It's actually quite dark and sometimes scary. I even had a nightmare about it while reading it, but don't let that scare you away...I'm just rather sensitive As a matter of fact, any book that can affect me that way is worth reading in my view. I say, give it a try, it's definitely a read you can sink your teeth into.
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Old 12-05-2011, 05:45 PM
 
Location: prescott az
6,957 posts, read 12,054,901 times
Reputation: 14244
Just finished "Imperfect Justice" by the lawyer who proscecuted Casey Anthony in Florida.
After reading it, I cannot understand the verdict of the jury. And the details in the book are graphic, including the photos in the middle. She is a monster and needs to pay for what she did.
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Old 12-06-2011, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
I hate when I've just finished a few fabulous books, New York being the most recent, and then nothing else seems worthy of my time.

I started All the Little Live Things by Wallace Stegner. Nope. Not interested at all, and won't ever be.
I started Age of Iron by J.M. Coetzee. I'm not going to ever get through that either. Too weird for me.

I have a couple more books in my night table but none of them are calling out to me. I have a bunch of books that are en route to me. I hope something arrives today. Maybe the big box of books from my friend in NYC will arrive this week. And I have a few books that I'm on the wait list for at the library (for the Kindle editions) so maybe one of those will come through soon.
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Old 12-06-2011, 01:27 PM
 
10,113 posts, read 10,963,472 times
Reputation: 8597
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhxBarb View Post
Just finished "Imperfect Justice" by the lawyer who proscecuted Casey Anthony in Florida.
After reading it, I cannot understand the verdict of the jury. And the details in the book are graphic, including the photos in the middle. She is a monster and needs to pay for what she did.
I just finished "Imperfect Justice" and it was a good book. I found the behind the scenes work the prosecution did was amazing with Baez trying to block them anyway he could.

I just started John Grisham's new book "The Litigators."
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Old 12-06-2011, 01:37 PM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,182,410 times
Reputation: 37885
Quote:
Originally Posted by cablejockey View Post
Because its Christmas time I went back to a book I read years ago--The Joyous Season by Patrick Dennis. I am happy to report it hasnt lost a thing over the years--still funny and good to read!
The Joyous Season « the stacks my destination
I loved Patrick Dennis's books.
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Old 12-06-2011, 03:02 PM
 
4,046 posts, read 2,129,570 times
Reputation: 10980
Dawn, I thought you loved Wallace Stegner. Is the love affair over? Do I need to find you a new literary boyfriend?
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Old 12-06-2011, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post
Dawn, I thought you loved Wallace Stegner. Is the love affair over? Do I need to find you a new literary boyfriend?
BAHAHAHAHAHA!!! Maybe... and preferably one who's still alive.

I do still like him. I just kind of feel like I read his best book (or at least the one that *I* liked the best) first, and it kind of set the bar high. I loved -- absolutely LOVED -- Crossing to Safety. And while I really, really, really enjoyed Remembering Laughter, and also very much liked Angle of Repose, I think that I hit the jackpot on that first one. I have one left that I want to read -- The Spectator Bird -- and I *will* read it. But, yeah, I think the bloom is off the rose.
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Old 12-07-2011, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,316,797 times
Reputation: 9858
I recently finished Seal Target Geronimo by Chuck Pfarrer. I think it came out in November. It is a slim book but it packs quite a bit of information into its pages. I was impressed. I had expected something that kind of skimmed over the details, and trotted out old theories, in an effort to cash in on the killing of bin Laden. Not so.

The quality of the writing was superior to most military memoirs - the guy can actually write. He leads up to the bin Laden element of the story with the story of the Maersk. He doesn't overdo the whole SEAL training story, which most SEAL memoirs tend to focus on, but adds details of the training that I've not read before.

He gives some insight into bin Laden and Zawahiri, including the fact that Zawahiri was so terribly tortured (sodomized with a baton) by Egyptian police years ago, that it twisted his character. Pfarrer also claims that Zawahiri set up bin Laden, deliberately using a blown courier to convey messages to bin Laden, in the hope that someone would put bin Laden out of the picture.

The other thing Pfarrer claims is that the story of there being no WMD in Iraq is a myth - that there were plenty of WMDs in Iraq, and that they had been dispersed throughout the country, and that al Qaeda found them and to this day keeps trying to gas people with mustard gas. He quotes correspondence by WikiLeaks as his source.

Pffarrer's most controversial (to me) claim is that the US government is deliberately concealing the fact of these weapons of mass destruction. Pffarrer quotes an article published in 2007 in The Spectator, by Melanie Phillips as to why the government would be covering up these chemical weapons:

The Republicans won't touch this because it would reveal the incompetence of the Bush administration in failing to neutralise the danger of Iraqi WMD. The Democrats won't touch it because it would show President Bush was right to invade Iraq in the first place. It is an axis of embarrassment.

He also claims that the press purposefully ignore the story because it doesn't fit into what they've been reporting for years. That just doesn't make any sense to me, because if that was the case, they would have stuck to the WMD-in-Iraq-Nuclear-Weapons story, and never changed it. I mean, the press jumped all over that story, and going to war, and in the beginning, I never once heard a reporter question the wisdom of those decisions, or the intelligence.

So I tend to chalk Pfarrer's opinion on that up to a dislike of the press.

I didn't do any kind of extensive search but I did Google WMD in Iraq, and did come up with a few articles detailing the finding of mustard gas and the like, and attempts by insurgents to use it. But I thought what was not found in Iraq was massive caches and stockpiling of these weapons. I am not sure Pfarrer is differentiating between the occasional discovery of a relatively minor store of chemical weapons and the kind of WMD the original invasion expected to find.

And it is also clear that Pfarrer - and the SEALs - think very little of the CIA.

All in all, I highly recommend this book.

I also finished Hex by Allen Steele. It is part of the Coyote stories, but I didn't find it as good as Coyote, the first book. There just wasn't much character development. But the first Coyote - now THAT was a story.
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