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Old 01-05-2012, 10:31 PM
 
6,145 posts, read 7,281,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
I understand what you mean...no one would feel warm/fuzzy re slavery. And it is a novel, after all.

With all their foibles, mistakes, self-promoting actions...the charms of S and R still win out!

This was Marg Mitchell's only book....her biography is quite interesting, btw.



quote=TheBeagleLady;22372492]Oh, I agree with all of that. It's part of why I like the book. I just don't feel warm and fuzzy about the slavery aspect. Also, I really want to dislike Scarlett and Rhett, but I can't.
[/quote]


Yes, I want to dislike them, should dislike them but instead, I find myself rooting for them. I also know the book isn't an accurate historical representation of slavery. I didn't know this was Margaret Mitchell's only book. Interesting.
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Old 01-06-2012, 12:45 AM
 
2,002 posts, read 4,417,432 times
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I'm trying to read "Point of Origin" by Patricia Cornwell. Ken Follett's facebook page recommended the book so I thought I'd give it a shot. I love murder mysteries but this one I can't finish. I've tried to read it 4 or 5 times but I'm getting tired of references to earlier books and things that the reader is supposed to know about the characters.

The rest of my readings are comics. "Preacher" got my attention. Like one of my friends said: "It's like watching a train wreck". "Lock and Key" is also very interesting.
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Old 01-06-2012, 01:01 AM
 
3,774 posts, read 10,790,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miguel's mom View Post
Just got started on "Storm Front" book one of the Dresden Files. Seems promising.
Love Jim Butcher and Harry Dresden, but deplored the SyFy Channel take on it.
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Old 01-06-2012, 03:14 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,078 posts, read 10,207,254 times
Reputation: 30347
I read this book twice w/several yrs in between. I found it quite remarkable, but there were parts that were sad.

Lamb has a knack for revealing deep-seated feelings the character only recognizes at the end of the book....The enormous effect of having/being responsible for/loving & hating a mentally-ill brother shines in this novel...in the end the overwhelming love and bond they share comes to light.

I loved it, as well as "She's Come Undone" .....a later novel by WL.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I'll be interested in hearing what you think of it. I'd like to read it but it sounds so depressing.
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Old 01-06-2012, 03:28 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,078 posts, read 10,207,254 times
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She is hands-down my favorite. I bought almost all her bks over the years, others from the library, and can reread them with no loss of joy. No one else can develop the most adorable characters like she does...everyone is so odd and bewildering and funny and determined and...well, we can smile or laugh out loud with their antics.

Thanks for the reminder-might have to reread A Patchwork Planet
one day soon.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I'm reading Anne Tyler's Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant.

This woman.....this writer.....I have never encountered an author who is better at conveying the heart of the human condition as well as Anne Tyler. Her stories are actually quite simple but the people inside them are wondrous creations through whom the reader experiences all the emotions in the spectrum.

Tyler has the ability to make me laugh and then cry in the same paragraph.

I'm slowly working my way through all her books. I have to be careful because it's like eating too much dessert. I don't want to finish all the dessert at once. It's such a treat to look forward to the next one.
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Old 01-06-2012, 10:50 AM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,786 posts, read 17,872,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JavaPhil View Post
Love Jim Butcher and Harry Dresden, but deplored the SyFy Channel take on it.
Actually I liked the TV version quite a bit, once I adjusted to human-looking Bob and the Jeep instead of the VW. But then I much preferred the mystery angle of the books to the dealings with the vampire courts and the fae - that later books haven't been nearly as enjoyable to me.
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Old 01-06-2012, 01:19 PM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,945,914 times
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The Big Book of Christian Mysticism by Carl McColman.
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Old 01-06-2012, 05:37 PM
 
Location: State of Grace
1,608 posts, read 1,390,827 times
Reputation: 2692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
I did enjoy, though I'll admit there were times I considered giving up on it. I kept coming back to it, and I'm glad I did, but it is seriously long. I think I read somewhere that it's about 350,000 words, and I definitely believe that.
Afternoon, Lamplight!

What's wrong with long? Long can be good, as you get to stay with the ongoing story and the characters longer. Three-hundred-and-fifty-thousand words isn't that long. The unforgettable Time & Unforeseen Occurrence series has almost three million words, but they are, of course, spread out over nine books - the initial seven-novel series, the sequel, Letters to Jenny, and the final book, When Times Collide. (So, averaging 333,000 words per book.)

When you're into a story, when you're intellectually and emotionally invested in it, long can be good. It's the reason why people (as recently discussed on another thread) 'panic' as they approach the last few pages of a book they're enjoying - they don't want it to end!

Think of TV series' such as Star Trek, or movies like the Star Wars trilogy, The Godfather, Jurassic Park, The Bourne Identity (and its sequels), and miniseries' like Lonesome Dove, the Return to Lonesome Dove, and The Thorn Birds, and let's not forget powerful TV dramas such as ER, and CSI, and (Heaven help us) all the soap operas that have been airing for decades.

One can eat an elephant a bite at a time, and as long as that elephant is delicious the 'more is more' school of thought can and does apply.

Just my two cents,

Mahrie.

Last edited by Mahrie; 01-06-2012 at 05:52 PM..
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Old 01-06-2012, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
9,746 posts, read 16,078,876 times
Reputation: 14881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahrie View Post
Afternoon, Lamplight!

What's wrong with long? Long can be good, as you get to stay with the ongoing story and the characters longer. Three-hundred-and-fifty-thousand words isn't that long. The unforgettable Time & Unforeseen Occurrence series has almost three million words, but they are, of course, spread out over nine books - the initial seven-novel series, the sequel, Letters to Jenny, and the final book, When Times Collide. (So, averaging 333,000 words per book.)

When you're into a story, when you're intellectually and emotionally invested in it, long can be good. It's the reason why people (as recently discussed on another thread) 'panic' as they approach the last few pages of a book they're enjoying - they don't want it to end!

Think of TV series' such as Star Trek, or movies like the Star Wars trilogy, The Godfather, Jurassic Park, The Bourne Identity (and its sequels), and miniseries' like Lonesome Dove, the Return to Lonesome Dove, and The Thorn Birds, and let's not forget powerful TV dramas such as ER, and CSI, and (Heaven help us) all the soap operas that have been airing for decades.

One can eat an elephant a bite at a time, and as long as that elephant is delicious the 'more is more' school of thought can and does apply.

Just my two cents,

Mahrie.
Mahrie,

There's definitely nothing wrong with long books, and for the most part throughout my reading of Anna Karenina I was eager to start reading again where I left off. But in the meantime, I came across several other books I really wanted to read, and Anna Karenina was just taking sooo long to finish, so I started to become eager to dive into my next book. I've read some long non-fiction books that I eventually just had to take breaks from, and come back to them later. But luckily with this one I didn't have to. I should also add that just before Anna Karenina I read the Studs Lonigan trilogy, which was also fairly long (but not as 'wordy'), so I think reading two long books in a row started to get to me.
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Old 01-07-2012, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Coastal North Carolina
220 posts, read 260,291 times
Reputation: 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeagleLady View Post
Oh, I agree with all of that. It's part of why I like the book. I just don't feel warm and fuzzy about the slavery aspect. Also, I really want to dislike Scarlett and Rhett, but I can't.
I have been reading Gone With The Wind for a little over a month now (I'm a slow reader and have been busy) and I am also pretty surprised that I like it so much. I know it's a classic, and I like classics, but I mainly read non-fiction and sometimes have a hard time getting into fiction. After a slow start, I keep finding myself wanting to get back to the book. Something about it keeps drawing me back but I'm not sure what. I just really enjoy it.

I haven't really been turned off by the slavery aspects of the book because it's just a fact of what really happened in those times. Sometimes I've had a hard time understanding Mitchell's dialogue she gives to the slaves, though.

Anyway, hope you keep enjoying the book! I wish I had the time to sit down and read for a few hours - I can't wait to see how this book turns out. I've never seen the movie so it will be a surprise for me!
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