Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-08-2012, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Southwest Suburbs
4,593 posts, read 9,192,619 times
Reputation: 3293

Advertisements

I am Legend by Richard Matheson
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-09-2012, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 16,203,678 times
Reputation: 33001
American Sniper by Chris Kyle. Chris Kyle holds the record as a military sniper for the most confirmed kills--160, although the actual number is higher. Whether you admire him or condemn him, Chris Kyle is a rarity among men today--he has the soul of a "warrior". The Warrior was much admired in medieval times and plays important roles in folklore and fairy tales today. This book provides a look into the mind of a 21st century warrior and I'm finding it a good read, although I'm not especially interested in the parts where he goes into great detail about the types of guns he used. Gun enthusiasts will love those parts, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2012, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Relocating to the LA area
7 posts, read 8,589 times
Reputation: 12
Just finished reading Shadow Heir by Richelle Mead. I love all her stuff. So sad this was the last book in the series.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2012, 10:19 AM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,183,744 times
Reputation: 37885
Macho Camacho's Beat by Luis Rafael Sánchez. This is a wonderful translation by Gregory Rabassa of a Puerto Rican novel. A summary from the back cover: "Infinitely multipled by the blare of radios, TVs ad record players in San Juan, Macho Camacho's guaracha weaves its way across the city and through the lives of one family on a single day: Senator Vincente Reinos, a crooked politician stuck in a gargantuan traffic jam; his neurotic, aristocratic wife..their son Benny...the Senator's mistress...her idiot child...cousins (Hughie, Louie & Dewey) and her friend, Doña Chon."

The language is glorious - puns, plays on words, alliterations galore, and acrobatic leaps - all suggesting the rhythm of the ubiquitous beat and lyrics of the guaracha of the title. It is raucous and raunchy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2012, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
I've been reading a couple of Orson Scott Card's books (I needed something light) but now I'm reading Matterhorn, a novel of the Vietnam war, by Karl Marlantes. It came out in 2010 to rave reviews. The author is a Vietnam vet and this book was a 30 year effort on his part, no doubt to help to still the demons that haunt him. I'm not very far in yet, and it is a fairly thick book, but I am liking it so far. I'm guessing, due to the author's own war experience, that it is probably a fair depiction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2012, 05:22 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I've been reading a couple of Orson Scott Card's books (I needed something light) but now I'm reading Matterhorn, a novel of the Vietnam war, by Karl Marlantes. It came out in 2010 to rave reviews. The author is a Vietnam vet and this book was a 30 year effort on his part, no doubt to help to still the demons that haunt him. I'm not very far in yet, and it is a fairly thick book, but I am liking it so far. I'm guessing, due to the author's own war experience, that it is probably a fair depiction.
Blah blah blah... How was The Night Circus? Did you finish it? Did you like it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2012, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
9,726 posts, read 16,736,031 times
Reputation: 14888
I finished Cass Timberlane the other night and liked it very, very much. In fact in may now be one of my favorites by Sinclair Lewis. Last night I started The Garden of Eden by Ernest Hemingway and read about fifty pages.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2012, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
Blah blah blah... How was The Night Circus? Did you finish it? Did you like it?
Oh yeah! Did I not post on that? I did like it - I remember that. But everything else has disappeared into a senior moment. I also read Bird Cloud by Annie Proulx. It's not the book it could have been if she was a little less self-absorbed. She writes about place, and yet she understands nothing essential, it seems to me, about the place where she built her giant house. Unlike hubby, I didn't end up loathing her, but I could certainly see how the book struck the chord of a complaining guest.

I am also in the middle of reading an old book, The Solace of Open Spaces by Gretel Ehrlich - an old book, sort of like Annie Dillard's book. This one is set in Wyoming - same place as Proulx's - but what a difference in approach and attitude.

Our weather here got down into the deep freeze one of the few times this winter, and with the wind howling here, and Ehrlich's Wyoming wind howling there, I got goosebumps. She describes winter perfectly. Proulx seemed surprised that winter dared to exist in her presence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2012, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Oh yeah! Did I not post on that? I did like it - I remember that. But everything else has disappeared into a senior moment. I also read Bird Cloud by Annie Proulx. It's not the book it could have been if she was a little less self-absorbed. She writes about place, and yet she understands nothing essential, it seems to me, about the place where she built her giant house. Unlike hubby, I didn't end up loathing her, but I could certainly see how the book struck the chord of a complaining guest.

I am also in the middle of reading an old book, The Solace of Open Spaces by Gretel Ehrlich - an old book, sort of like Annie Dillard's book. This one is set in Wyoming - same place as Proulx's - but what a difference in approach and attitude.

Our weather here got down into the deep freeze one of the few times this winter, and with the wind howling here, and Ehrlich's Wyoming wind howling there, I got goosebumps. She describes winter perfectly. Proulx seemed surprised that winter dared to exist in her presence.
If you did post about The Night Circus, I didn't catch it. Sorry 'bout that.

It's getting cold here too, and your talk of howling winds and goosebumps is making me eye the blanket that's on Artie's futon in my office. Nap time!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2012, 11:23 AM
 
6,904 posts, read 7,599,549 times
Reputation: 21735
I also read Birdcloud, and was disappointed. I usually love and adore Annie Proulx. I also expected the book to be an exploration of Place, but it read more like an ordinary whiney diary written by someone building any house anywhere - complaining about contractors, cost, problems encountered, and etc. On the other hand, I recommended the book (as kind of a cautionary tale) to someone excited about building their dream home in the mountains of western Montana. It never hurts to be reminded that humdrum reality can turn a dream into a tedious task, if not a nightmare.

I just bought two paperback mysteries at the dollar store and was unpleasantly surprised to find out they are Christian fiction. There really needs to be a warning label on such books !!! About half of the books our local library buys now are Christian fiction. Great for the people who have that point of view, but that does leave the rest of us desperate for something to read! Guess it's time to get out the checkbook and donate to the library's acquisition fund, specifying that the funds NOT be spent on Christian Fiction!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top