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Old 01-18-2012, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903

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The Memory Palace: A Memoir by Mira Bartok
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Old 01-18-2012, 03:51 PM
 
14,767 posts, read 17,109,412 times
Reputation: 20658
Cicero de Amicitia (On Friendship) and Scipio's Dream...
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Old 01-18-2012, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Coastal North Carolina
220 posts, read 282,632 times
Reputation: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I finished reading it - couldn't take my eyes off the last couple of pages. I highly recommend the book. It reads like an honest account of the war, not that I would know, but I guess that any vets reading it would know, and any military families would know better than I what strikes a false chord. Situations are described that I would never have thought of - like the jostling for promotions, often at the expense of men and common sense. In fact, if even half of what he has his characters saying about how that war was run is true, it's really beyond horrifying.

And if that's the case, it's no wonder the writer suffers PTSD (there's an interview at the back of the book). In addition to that, he also works in the race issues of the 60s and 70s, so it is more about a particular place and time, and not limited to the war.

I don't think I've read any fiction about the Vietnam war but I can't imagine a better depiction. At first, I kind of thought the book started off slow and in places, it read a little awkward to my ear. This may be because it is the writer's first book and he wasn't sure at the beginning himself just what he was going to say and how he was going to say it.

I find his conversations, one of the hardest things to write well, very believable.

I give it 4 stars out of 4 but if I was married to a soldier going to war, I'm not so sure the book wouldn't give me a heart attack.
Thank you for your review! I really appreciate it.

If you're interested, a fiction Vietnam War book you might like is The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien. It's been awhile since I've read it but both my father-in-law and husband have read it recently and they both enjoyed it. My father-in-law spent a year over in Vietnam with the Army. My husband spent almost a year in Afghanistan.
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Old 01-18-2012, 10:36 PM
 
3,734 posts, read 4,545,735 times
Reputation: 4290
The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine by Alina Bronsky

I stumbled across this book at the library. It is laugh-out-loud funny!
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Old 01-19-2012, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Virginia
90 posts, read 131,495 times
Reputation: 288
Just finished People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks. That was fantastic! The kind of book I pick up to read a few pages while stirring whatever I've got cooking on the stove.

For light reading I like anything by Dorothea Benton Frank. Takes me away from regular life and into coastal Carolina where slow drawls and good seafood rule the world.

I'm a big fan of historical fiction. Jeff Shaara is excellent. The Civil War series he wrote (finished the series his father started) is extremely good.

Just one more (because the list could go on and on). Diana Gabaldon's time travel series. Historically interesting, yes, but then there's the whole concept of going through a circle of stones and finding a handsome young Highlander on the other side. Sigh....
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Old 01-19-2012, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeeingJane View Post
Just finished People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks. That was fantastic! The kind of book I pick up to read a few pages while stirring whatever I've got cooking on the stove.

For light reading I like anything by Dorothea Benton Frank. Takes me away from regular life and into coastal Carolina where slow drawls and good seafood rule the world.

I'm a big fan of historical fiction. Jeff Shaara is excellent. The Civil War series he wrote (finished the series his father started) is extremely good.

Just one more (because the list could go on and on). Diana Gabaldon's time travel series. Historically interesting, yes, but then there's the whole concept of going through a circle of stones and finding a handsome young Highlander on the other side. Sigh....
It's good to hear that you enjoyed People of the Book. I bought it last year but have not started reading it.
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Old 01-20-2012, 06:27 AM
 
232 posts, read 151,954 times
Reputation: 76
Polk: The man who changed America.
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Old 01-20-2012, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
Just finished Michele Young-Stone's "The Handbook for Lightning Strike Survivors", which I really liked a lot. She's a young author, and I got that rare sense that I would like her as a person, not just a writer. A light, rambling read.

Next: Starting Brady Udall's "The Lonely Polygamist"
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Old 01-20-2012, 10:57 AM
 
5,097 posts, read 6,346,558 times
Reputation: 11750
I was bringing back a book to the library and saw a "Scarpetta" book I hadn't read, "Port Mortuary".... it's "ok", but it reminded me of why I stopped reading the Scarpetta books.
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Old 01-20-2012, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Ohio
1,561 posts, read 2,257,461 times
Reputation: 2508
I just read Jeff Ashton's book Imperfect Justice: Prosecuting Casey Anthony .I thought it was a great book that showed what him and the prosecution team had to do to prepare for the case behind the scenes. I liked reading his opinion about everything from Baez, to witnesses, and Casey herself. But, wow, I was so disappointed he offered nothing on what him and the team felt when they went to the court room and heard the verdict. All he said was they went into the court room and found out she was not guilty on the big charges and guilty on a few minor charges, then went on to the next topic.

He offered his opinion and what the team felt on everything, but he totally skipped over that. I was dying to hear from him what him and the other attorneys felt on his team after working for over 3 years to convict Casey and suddenly it all ended with a not guilty verdict. Kind of bummed me out, but all in all a good book.

Next, I might read Shaquille O'Neal's new book just to get a break from the seriousness of the Casey Anthony book.
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