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Old 04-07-2012, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Homeless
17,717 posts, read 13,527,920 times
Reputation: 11994

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rxgrrl View Post
I just started reading Game of Thrones (first book of five) by George R.R. Martin. I have been watching the series on HBO so I figured I should read the books to understand better what is going on.


I've read 4 of the 5 so far & I love them I can't wait to read the last one. I'll be sorry to read it though knowing it's the last in the series.
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Old 04-07-2012, 08:06 AM
 
Location: The other side of the Cumberland Plateau
363 posts, read 583,185 times
Reputation: 538
Been awhile since I contributed to this thread but have done a lot of reading in the meantime:

Just finished "Thunder Dog" ("the true story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust at Ground Zero") by Michael Hingson with Susy Flory. IMO, the story dealt very little with this man's situation on that fateful day but more with his blindness and how that's impacted his life.

"The Lost Wife" by Alyson Richman, author of "The Last Van Gogh"...deals with the occupation before, during and after WWII. The closer I got to the end of the book, the more I was holding my breathe.

"Roam" by Alan Lazar, about a dog who gets lost and how he roams across the United States. It's a happy/sad story but not in an abusive way. The story is told from the dog's perspective, which some may have trouble believing. Afterall, a dog can't tell us what he's thinking or feeling. Even so, I enjoyed this book.
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Old 04-07-2012, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Eastern NC
20,868 posts, read 23,543,034 times
Reputation: 18814
I am into reading true adventure stories. The last few I read are Winter Dance, a great book about the author running the Iditarod dog sled race, and Polar Dream, a good book about the first woman to walk to the north pole.
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Old 04-07-2012, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Rut roh.

I started Escape by Carolyn Jessop last night. I wasn't enjoying it. I'm not sure if it's because it's poorly written (it is) or if it's because the subject is so bizarre and other-worldly for me (it is). Maybe I'll try it again another time.

Today I started Await Your Reply by Dan Chaon. I think I only read a dozen pages. That one's not going to work for me either.

ACK!
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Old 04-07-2012, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Wherever I want to be... ;)
2,536 posts, read 9,928,487 times
Reputation: 1995
I'm reading Catching Fire at the moment and feel that the whole series is thoroughly meh. I'm not understanding the Hunger Games hype at all.

Recently I read I Know This Much Is True (why haven't I read that before??!?!) and I *attempted* to read A Thousand Years of Solitude but... ehh... couldn't get into it. Something with having tons of characters with similar names and the weird "magical" subplot didn't appeal to me. I read The Help too which I liked but didn't love.

Next I'm embarking on reading the full unabridged English translation of The Count of Monte Cristo...

Last edited by thepinksquid; 04-10-2012 at 12:27 AM..
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Old 04-08-2012, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom.

Quote:
Corrie ten Boom was a woman admired the world over for her courage, her forgiveness, and her memorable faith. In World War II, she and her family risked their lives to help Jews escape the Nazis, and their reward was a trip to Hitler's concentration camps. But she survived and was released--as a result of a clerical error--and now shares the story of how faith triumphs over evil.
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Old 04-08-2012, 03:49 PM
 
Location: On the west side of the Tetons
1,353 posts, read 2,430,083 times
Reputation: 2626
Soldier Dogs by Maria Goodavage
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Old 04-09-2012, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 16,203,678 times
Reputation: 33001
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom.
I read that book 30+ years ago. It has stayed with me all this time. It is one of the most remarkable books I have ever read and the movie was every bit as good.
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Old 04-09-2012, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cunucu Beach View Post
I read that book 30+ years ago. It has stayed with me all this time. It is one of the most remarkable books I have ever read and the movie was every bit as good.
I don't typically like the "hiding the Jews from the Nazis" stories because it makes me so incredibly sad for my family members -- and all the others -- who were not hidden and who did not get out safely, but there's something about this family of watchmakers who are so completely endearing that, if nothing else, I want to enjoy their happiness. There was a line in the early part of the book (I'm only about a quarter of the way through it) that said that their home was always a happy home and it truly seemed that way. (The celebration of the 100th anniversary of their business was wonderfully told.) Of course I know things are going to get ugly, but still...
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Old 04-09-2012, 09:20 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
Started The Hunger Games yesterday. Hope the whole thing isn't as grim as the first part. I don't particularly like the POV--I guess you call it first person present. I get that it gives a feeling of immediacy and creates tension, but I think it's almost pretentious in a weird way.
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