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Old 04-16-2012, 12:11 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
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I finished The Hunger Games and enjoyed it more than I thought I would. I wouldn't say it's great, but I'm interested enough that I'm looking forward to reading Catching Fire next.

Before I get there though, I took a detour to read Running the Books by Avi Steinberg. It's a memoir about his being a prison librarian. I'm not sure about it so far. He sounds immature, or at least young. I'm hoping it gets better.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Time and Again by Jack Finney arrived today. I had ordered it with my husband's Amazon Prime account so it was the first of my ordered books to arrive (including from my library Kindle waiting list). I'll start it tonight. I don't love the idea of time travel but when you were all talking about it on another thread, this one appealed to me because of the whole "old New York" thing. That always seems to suck me in.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
Time and Again arrived today. I had ordered it with my husband's Amazon Prime account so it was the first of my ordered books to arrive (including from my library Kindle waiting list). I'll start it tonight. I don't love the idea of time travel but when you were all talking about it on another thread, this one appealed to me because of the whole "old New York" thing. That always seems to suck me in.
I came across a book for you - The Weird Sisters. I thought of buying it for myself but I already have weird sisters and sometimes I don't like to read things that are too much like real life.

Now to get everything downloaded onto my new 'puter. I feel a little giddy
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Old 04-16-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I came across a book for you - The Weird Sisters. I thought of buying it for myself but I already have weird sisters and sometimes I don't like to read things that are too much like real life.

Now to get everything downloaded onto my new 'puter. I feel a little giddy
BAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Actually, I got that from the library when they first started lending on Kindle. I didn't get past page 25 or so. I didn't like the writing style and, just from the blurb on the jacket, I knew how the story was going to play out. And if *I* couldn't get into it, it's definitely not *your* kind of book -- you're a much more sophisticated reader than I am.

Go play with your computer!!!!! See if you can make smiley faces in emails now!
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Old 04-17-2012, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
Lionel Shriver's "So Much for That". A longish novel about what happens when an American is faced with medical expenses. It doesn't move very fast, but Shriver is a good enough writer to fill the spaces with incisive, observant material that keeps one going.
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Old 04-17-2012, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Well... Time and Again was not working for me. I was able to get past my dislike for time travel (after all, I had read and loved The Time Traveler's Wife) but by page 102, when I thought, "Just under 300 pages to go!," I knew it was over for me. I guess that I was hoping that it would be like Forever by Pete Hamill (just in reverse) but it wasn't. The details (and some of the dialogue) just felt so heavy-handed (why is Rube so angry sometimes?!) that it started feeling like a chore. That means it's time to end the pain.

I'm going to read some real crime by Dominick Dunne (Amazon.com: Fatal Charms and Other Tales of Today/The Mansions of Limbo (Omnibus) (9780345430595): Dominick Dunne: Books) until some of my other books get delivered or Kindle-available at the library.
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Old 04-17-2012, 07:43 PM
 
4,046 posts, read 2,130,139 times
Reputation: 10985
Makes me feel better when some of you avid readers can't get into certain books! I've been having difficulty finding a book that I like.

See, Dawn---another endorsement of Lionel Shriver's So Much For That! (Yup, I saw what you saw on Amazon---the spoiler that is a little oulandish.)
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Old 04-18-2012, 12:50 AM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,385,004 times
Reputation: 30253
I finally made it through "Game of Thrones" by George R.R. Martin. Too bad I don't have more time to read at the moment. It took me nearly 4 weeks!!!

Now I'm getting started on "A Feast for Crows". Love the Fire and Ice series!
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Old 04-18-2012, 11:02 AM
 
Location: somewhere between Lk. Michigan & Lk. Huron
5,585 posts, read 984,372 times
Reputation: 1394
The Trees/by Conrad Richter

The Trees is a moving novel of the beginning of the American trek to the west. Toward the close of the eighteenth century, the land west of the Alleghenies and north of the Ohio River was an unbroken sea of trees. Beneath them the forest trails were dark, silent, and lonely, brightened only by a few lost beams of sunlight. Here, in the first novel of Conrad Richter's Awakening Land trilogy, the Lucketts, a wild, woods-faring family, lived their roaming life, pushing ever westward as the frontier advanced and as new settlements threatened their isolation.
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Old 04-18-2012, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Colorado
4,306 posts, read 13,468,580 times
Reputation: 4477
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
After the death of her much-loved mother, the implosion of her marriage and the self-destructive path she put herself on, Cheryl Strayed decided one day to hike the Pacific Coast Trail. This is a brutally honest and fascinating memoir of her hike and the metamorphosis she underwent during this trip.
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