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Old 08-27-2012, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,893 posts, read 18,175,929 times
Reputation: 62765

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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
My mistake. I was thinking about religion - I was shocked to learn they had only been granted freedom of relgion in 1978 (the American Indian Religious Freedom Act).
Gosh, Netwit, that is the very first mistake that I am aware of that you have made in your life Truly. I'm serious.
I didn't know about the freedom of religion issue. That the most disgustingly ironic thing I have learned in a long time. The country founded on religious freedom waited over 200 years to grant religious freedom to First Nation people. I learned "First Nation" from you and I like it a lot.

Yesterday I got an email from Amazon listing books that I might be interested in and one of them is the only book written about the life of a code talker on the rez and his life during WWII. So, I had to get it. I'll report back when I get around to reading it. So many books, so little time.
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Old 08-27-2012, 04:32 PM
 
1,403 posts, read 930,253 times
Reputation: 357
Started Conscience of a conservative last night. Very good book. He was the Ron Paul of his generation.
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Old 08-27-2012, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,224 posts, read 9,177,920 times
Reputation: 9783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
Gosh, Netwit, that is the very first mistake that I am aware of that you have made in your life Truly. I'm serious.
I didn't know about the freedom of religion issue. That the most disgustingly ironic thing I have learned in a long time. The country founded on religious freedom waited over 200 years to grant religious freedom to First Nation people. I learned "First Nation" from you and I like it a lot.

Yesterday I got an email from Amazon listing books that I might be interested in and one of them is the only book written about the life of a code talker on the rez and his life during WWII. So, I had to get it. I'll report back when I get around to reading it. So many books, so little time.
Nope, I'm sure I've made lots of mistakes. I had to look up that freedom of religion thing by searching the book on which I bent the pages . That's why I bend pages when I come across something interesting.

But right now, without looking at bent pages (and I don't even remember how much Teurer goes into it and how much I've read elsewhere at other times) I think the Freedom of Religion thing was related to the Ghost Dance (at which Sitting Bull? Crazy Horse? - that may be another mistake since I'm not re-searching it - was killed) and which the officials at the time thought would lead to an uprising, and also the Sundance. I knew the sundance was outlawed for years. Coincidentally, the August issue of National Geographic covers Pine Ridge and is titled In the Spirit of Crazy Horse.

Teurer goes into a lot of detail with a couple of court cases (that's where my eyes kind of crossed and I had to reread sections) and I guess he is so well versed in it because his mother is a judge. I forgot to add in my post that he does talk about his Jewish father and says that he lived on the reservation and seems to identify with the natives more than his own people. And so Teurer grew up identifying with them as well.

He is also critical of the reservations and the way natives themselves treat each other. So it's not all one-sided.

I have read about the code talkers and I believe National Geographic has had at least one special devoted to it. But I would love to hear about the book you have. Maybe it's not the one I read.

Okay, puppy-walking time....
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Old 08-27-2012, 04:40 PM
 
13,499 posts, read 18,056,071 times
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Finished Nella Larsen's Passing; have started on Graham Greene's Our Man in Havana.
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Old 08-27-2012, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,809,592 times
Reputation: 28897
The Invisible Bridge by Julie Orringer.

Just a few pages in, don't know the meat of the story yet, but the writing is perfectly fluid.

Amazon.com: The Invisible Bridge (Vintage Contemporaries) (9781400034376): Julie Orringer: Books

The reviews are excellent, and I love that she's a first-time author. I always seem to enjoy first-timers -- they don't yet have a formula.
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Old 08-27-2012, 06:15 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,476,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
The Invisible Bridge by Julie Orringer. ... I love that she's a first-time author. I always seem to enjoy first-timers -- they don't yet have a formula.
Isn't that the way it sometimes happens.

Earlier today I listened to a portion of Regina Brett's "God Never Blinks." It's forty-five lessons of life she sat down and wrote after surviving breast cancer and isn't a religious book, so far. Well, she does occasionally bring God into it but mostly it's just life's lessons. It made the time chopping veggies for my stew go more quickly.
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Old 08-29-2012, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,618 posts, read 86,464,984 times
Reputation: 36636
Just finished "The Rich Man's Table" by Scott Spencer, which I didn't like. Not the fault of the author, I've loied other Spencer books, but I couldn't relate to the story line and the culture that it reflected.

I want to get "In the Garden of the Beasts" by Erik Larson next, it was checked out at the library, and due back today, but now I see that it has been renewed by the borrower. I feel like I've been sniped on Ebay. Has anybody read that?
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Old 08-29-2012, 02:27 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,569,663 times
Reputation: 26859
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Just finished "The Rich Man's Table" by Scott Spencer, which I didn't like. Not the fault of the author, I've loied other Spencer books, but I couldn't relate to the story line and the culture that it reflected.

I want to get "In the Garden of the Beasts" by Erik Larson next, it was checked out at the library, and due back today, but now I see that it has been renewed by the borrower. I feel like I've been sniped on Ebay. Has anybody read that?
Yes, In the Garden of the Beasts is interesting and well-written. Sorry you're going to have to wait on it. Have you read other Erik Larson books? Maybe you can read one of those in the meantime. If you haven't read Isaac's Storm you could look for it.
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Old 08-29-2012, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,809,592 times
Reputation: 28897
Fabulous reviews or not, and 25% into the book, I'm giving up on The Invisible Bridge (by Julie Orringer). Although there's a political, war slant to it -- since it takes place in Europe in the late 1930s -- there's much too much of a soap opera story to it, which just isn't working for me. I'm not sure what I'll read next.
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Old 08-29-2012, 07:56 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,476,031 times
Reputation: 14764
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
Fabulous reviews or not, and 25% into the book, I'm giving up on The Invisible Bridge (by Julie Orringer). Although there's a political, war slant to it -- since it takes place in Europe in the late 1930s -- there's much too much of a soap opera story to it, which just isn't working for me. I'm not sure what I'll read next.
If a setting in the 30's has your interest, my favorite book by Steinbeck was Tortilla Flat (1935). DH and I listened to it, but it was a great story and kept our interest throughout.

"Billy Bathgate" by E.L. Doctorow (one of my favorite authors) comes highly reviewed in GoodReads, but I haven't actually read that one. (I loved "Ragtime.")

I cannot recommend William Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom" (1936) -- I tried for three years to read that book, and could never get past page three! I did read "As I Lay Dying" (1930) and, frankly -- I wished it had been a shorter illness.

That's the best I can do....
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