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Old 09-26-2012, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,401 posts, read 28,714,749 times
Reputation: 12062

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War Brides Helen Bryan

Due to arrive in mail In the Garden of Beasts Erik Larson

And Still Alice a book that stuck my interest after reading some posts here.
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Old 09-26-2012, 06:10 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,929,449 times
Reputation: 7237
I am two thirds done with "The Cutting Season" by Attica Locke and I am really enjoying it!. The setting is an old sugar plantation in Louisiana that has been restored and is open as a present day museum. The story intertwines a recent murder with the historic past of the plantation.
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Old 09-26-2012, 06:48 AM
 
18,950 posts, read 11,586,547 times
Reputation: 69889
Hey guys, I forgot to update that I finished Blood Meridian - my first Cormac McCarthy book - and adored it. It was brutal with only a few nuggets of extremely dark humor to ease the way. Even so, it was one of the best books I've ever read. His use of language, complex syntax, vivid imagery, you name it - it was beautifully grotesque and vivid.

I forget what was after that but do remember feeling like nothing could measure up and nothing was even suitable to follow McCarthy. Now I'm reading The Missing Shade of Blue by Jennie Erdal. It's a novel with David Hume's theory of the same name threading through it.
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Old 09-26-2012, 08:06 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,698,048 times
Reputation: 26860
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I just downloaded Beloved, Marlow.I'll let you know what I think of it. Thanks for the rec.
I thought it was a very challenging read, but it got under my skin and stayed there a while. Hope you enjoy it.
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Old 09-26-2012, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Coastal North Carolina
220 posts, read 282,588 times
Reputation: 321
I finished Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand. I thought it was a really good book, but I wished she wrote more about Louie Zamperini's life before and after the war. The bulk of the book dealt with Louie's war-time experiences, which were fascinating and unbelievable. I kept finding myself saying "I can't believe that actually happened" out loud many times. WWII troops were TOUGH. I'm not trying to diminish what servicemen and -women go through today (I mean, my husband is a Marine who has deployed once and is going again soon, I volunteer with an organization that helps wounded Marines, and I know many, many troops), but due to the nature of warfare in WWII/Korea/Vietnam versus what is seen today, and the advances in military technology today, present troops don't see the same type of fighting they did back then. I like to read about past wars and I'm constantly amazed what the troops faced. Wow. Anyway, the part on Louie and the war was fantastic and the best part of the book.

I just requested a couple of books from the other branch of our two-branch county library system, so once they get to my local library in a day or two I'll start on those. Until then, I'm going to start reading Historic Haunted America for some fun, mindless reading.
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Old 09-26-2012, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,013,815 times
Reputation: 28903
I'm almost finished The Priviliges. Thank God it's almost over. The tedium, the tedium, the tedium. I was going to start a biography about Brooke Astor, but I think I've had enough of the uber-rich for a while, fiction or otherwise. (I will, though, read the Brooke Astor biography one day. I admire her philanthropy. It's too bad that she's gone...)

I'm hoping that one of my library holds comes through tomorrow. I don't think any of the paper books will come in the mail tomorrow -- that would be too quick for USPS.
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Old 09-26-2012, 07:29 PM
 
777 posts, read 1,336,207 times
Reputation: 720
Just finished Night Road and about to start I Am Not a Serial Killer by Wells.
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Old 09-26-2012, 07:35 PM
 
1,370 posts, read 2,181,145 times
Reputation: 2696
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
About five minutes after I'd given up on The Sea by John Banville -- my gosh! were the reviewers ever right! Booker Prize or not, this is one boring book! -- the mail arrived. My friend in NYC, the one who works for the big-name publishing house, had sent me The Light Between Oceans (by M.L. Stedman). I don't know if it'll be good, but it can't be worse.
I also gave up on "The Sea," and I tried twice!!! Meaning I downloaded it two separate times from the library, and never got very far at all, and was sooooo bored. It was even read by one of my favorite narrators, John Lee!!!

The only other Booker Prize winner I know of that I have read is "The Echo Maker" by Richard Powers. It was a long, strange book that left me dissatisfied and depressed, and it seems to have put me off searching for a Booker Prize book ever since.

I am not in a reading phase at the moment, so am still plugging away at my Adam Dalgliesh all these weeks later. I can't seem to stay awake long enough to make any progress, but at least it's a good murder mystery and not some tedious book like you described above.
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Old 09-27-2012, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,401 posts, read 28,714,749 times
Reputation: 12062
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I am two thirds done with "The Cutting Season" by Attica Locke and I am really enjoying it!. The setting is an old sugar plantation in Louisiana that has been restored and is open as a present day museum. The story intertwines a recent murder with the historic past of the plantation.
Hmm will have to look for this..I enjoy these types of books
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Old 09-27-2012, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,013,815 times
Reputation: 28903
Still waiting for my library Kindle holds and stuff to come in the mail, but I found a couple of books at the library by Thrity Umrigar that sounded good:

The Space Between Us
and
The World We Found

I think that I'll start on The Space Between Us and save the other for another lull. That is, if both -- or either! -- are good. Maybe I'll just pretend that they were written by Jhumpa Lahiri so that I'm walking in with good thoughts.

ETA: I'm 5% into the book. Thrity Umrigar is no Jhumpa Lahiri.

Last edited by DawnMTL; 09-27-2012 at 09:37 AM..
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