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Old 10-21-2012, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood, DE and beautiful SXM!
12,054 posts, read 23,203,460 times
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I just started reading Patricia Cornwell's Bone Bed after seeing the good reviews. It has been quite a while since I have read anything by her. I am only on Chapter 4, but it is interesting so far.
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Old 10-21-2012, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,809,592 times
Reputation: 28897
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
What I do when suspense gets to me is read the ending. I don't find it spoils my experience of the book at all, but it takes off that edge that, in some books, makes me uncomfortable.
That's what the mother did in The End of Your Life Book Club. She did that with every book that she read.

The only time that I read the end of a book before I've finished it is when I don't want to read the book anymore, part way through. I figure that if I read the end, I'll have no desire to try reading it again. I just realized, though, that I haven't done that in a long time. Now, when I want to stop reading a book, I just do that: stop. But if I'm into a book and know that I'm going to see it through, I won't read the end. Don't you find that it spoils it for you, no matter what kind of book it is?
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,809,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
You might be interested in Ursula Hegi's "Stones from the River." I was quite taken with the story, and its portrayal of the small town life outside and the effects upon it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
Oh my. I read that book a couple of years ago. Jess5 recommended it to me. What an unusual story. It's a good book and I will always remember Trudi.
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Originally Posted by Jess5 View Post
I won't either, Ketabcha. I love that book.
I've had that book on my shelves for about a thousand years. Unread. That will change soon.

Thanks for jogging my memory, ladies, and giving me a gentle push.
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Old 10-21-2012, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
9,726 posts, read 16,647,187 times
Reputation: 14887
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
Oh! That would make me MENTAL!
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
EEEECCCCKKKK
I would have to throw that one out the window!
Well it's good to know I'm not alone.
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Old 10-21-2012, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,549 posts, read 30,238,228 times
Reputation: 88940
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
'kay, so you got me wondering and I looked up his books... I am fairly certain it was "From A Buick 8" based on the preview in Amazon's "Look Inside" feature.

From a Buick 8: Stephen King: 9780743417686: Amazon.com: Books
I never heard of that one. I think I'll pass


Quote:
Originally Posted by SXMGirl View Post
I just started reading Patricia Cornwell's Bone Bed after seeing the good reviews. It has been quite a while since I have read anything by her. I am only on Chapter 4, but it is interesting so far.
Enjoy it. I haven't tried her books yet.



I finished "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" and it has made me very curious about the real Native Americans. Any ideas on good books?


Last night I started "Free Fall" by Robert Crais...another corrupt cop novel who I'm sure will get it in the end.


This morning I started "See Jane Run". It is intriguing from the start. It starts with a woman who can't remember who she is. Under her coat she is covered in blood and she has one hundred dollar bills in her pocket. It should be a good one.


I have also been scanning Betty Crocker's "Vegetarian Cooking" which has some good recipes.
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Old 10-21-2012, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,224 posts, read 9,177,920 times
Reputation: 9783
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
That's what the mother did in The End of Your Life Book Club. She did that with every book that she read.

The only time that I read the end of a book before I've finished it is when I don't want to read the book anymore, part way through. I figure that if I read the end, I'll have no desire to try reading it again. I just realized, though, that I haven't done that in a long time. Now, when I want to stop reading a book, I just do that: stop. But if I'm into a book and know that I'm going to see it through, I won't read the end. Don't you find that it spoils it for you, no matter what kind of book it is?
I don't do that with every book but there are some books where not knowing what is going to happen puts me on edge and when I can't stand it a moment longer, I read the end. And no, apparently those things can increase your enjoyment of a book - Spoilers actually enhance your enjoyment | Books | guardian.co.uk

It's not about the kind of a book, but more about the feeling it gives me. I do it very rarely and it doesn't have anything to do with the genre.

When I stop reading a book, I am thoroughly done at that point and have no desire to see how it ends.
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Old 10-21-2012, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,809,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I don't do that with every book but there are some books where not knowing what is going to happen puts me on edge and when I can't stand it a moment longer, I read the end. And no, apparently those things can increase your enjoyment of a book - Spoilers actually enhance your enjoyment | Books | guardian.co.uk

It's not about the kind of a book, but more about the feeling it gives me. I do it very rarely and it doesn't have anything to do with the genre.

When I stop reading a book, I am thoroughly done at that point and have no desire to see how it ends.
You're a very interesting person, Netwit. But I already knew that.
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Old 10-21-2012, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,809,592 times
Reputation: 28897
I just started Beware of Pity by Stefan Zweig. I had tried to start it many times before, over the last six months or so, but it never worked. It's working just fine now.
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Old 10-21-2012, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,893 posts, read 18,175,929 times
Reputation: 62765
With the death of George McGovern I am reminded of a book that he wrote back in the 70s or 80s. I still have a hardcopy of it. I was a fan of McGovern and read it for that reason.

It's nonfiction and the title is Terry: My Daughter's Life and Death Struggle with Alcoholism.

The book is very loving and it is sad because they tried everything to help Terry. It also has a lot of interesing stories about what happened along the campaign trail. McGovern was such a good, kind man, IMO, and the book is his tribute to a daughter who could not get the monkey off her back regardless of all the support (emotional, medical and financial) that she had. I truly believe that she wanted to kick the alcohol to the curb but could not.

I highly recommend it.
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Old 10-21-2012, 07:50 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,476,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
With the death of George McGovern I am reminded of a book that he wrote back in the 70s or 80s. I still have a hardcopy of it. I was a fan of McGovern and read it for that reason.
I was only sixteen in his '72 campaign, but his was the first candidacy that captured my interest in politics. Perhaps it is his steadfast determination to fight the oppression of the Moral Majority (in later years) that woke me to the harm we do with our flagrant abuse of religious freedom. I did not know he'd died and I am sorry for the loss. As for alcoholism, I know first hand how it can destroy a person. It is a terrible disease that strikes the entire family.
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