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Old 02-05-2013, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,355 posts, read 28,548,894 times
Reputation: 11958

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Hmmmmmm. "He digs with the wrong foot" was a way in Ireland of characterizing someone of the other religion.

The traditional turf spade (a slane) used by Catholics were one-sided and was worked with the right foot; whereas the spade introduced when foreign Protestants were brought in during the various plantation schemes devised by the English government, those people used their own two-sided spade, which was worked with the left foot. Desmond Gillmor in his book The Irish Countryside mentions this on p. 124-125. However, in this section Gillmor doesn't refer to the division as sectarian but regional, with the former being used in the south and west, and the latter in the north and east - but then this roughly describes the areas where Protestant settlers were introduced. The bible for Irish rural customs and equipment is E. Estyn Evan's book Irish Folkways.

Thus, to refer to a Catholic as a "Left Footer" would seem to be incorrect.
My grannie always called non catholics Left footers...lol
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Old 02-05-2013, 12:10 PM
 
506 posts, read 951,676 times
Reputation: 570
Living History: Hillary Rodham Clinton
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Old 02-05-2013, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,206 posts, read 9,167,414 times
Reputation: 9780
I finished Between the Sheets and...um...um...and...the other book I mentioned in my last post. In spite of not remembering the title of that one, both were very good. I'm not sure I like biographers digging around in the personal lives of writers as the author of Between the Sheets does looking for ways to explain their writing.

There are too many factors that go into the making of a writer for it to be that simple and her idea that the women writers in the book chose their 'victimhood' by male writers for the sake of their craft, feeling suffering would make them better writers, is, imho, BS.

But it was interesting to read.

Now I am reading Thunder Road by Chadwick Ginter. It is urban fantasy, the gods of the Vikings coming to life. Literature it is not, and I'm not very far in, but I think it should be okay for a quick, breezy read.

I should also read American Sniper by the Kyle who was killed. I bought the book a while ago and began it, but I disliked the man who came through in the words enough to put it down without finishing it. Obviously, it's very sad that he's dead though. It would be a very hard book to review now because of what ended up happening to him.

And it's up to -28C today with the wind chill. Yippee! We're getting warmer!
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Old 02-05-2013, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
12,858 posts, read 16,730,309 times
Reputation: 33499
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. I decided to read all the classics again.
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Old 02-05-2013, 03:04 PM
 
16,807 posts, read 16,043,838 times
Reputation: 27880
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim9251 View Post
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. I decided to read all the classics again.
Cool. Haven't read Sherlock Holmes in years and years. Enjoy!
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Old 02-05-2013, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,893 posts, read 18,164,375 times
Reputation: 62765
I finished DeMille's The Charm School yesterday and wow is it an exciting book. His books usually are. This particular one had me on an emotional roller-coaster. I learned a bit about Russia that I did not know and I'm still wondering how I would deal with being in the US embassy in Moscow back in the day or even today when I'd be followed wherever I went. I know I would miss "home" even though I've lived all over the place as a child of the military and never felt that I was away from home. My family was my home and we moved it from place to place. "But I was so much older then. I'm younger than that now."

I'm now reading Blown for Good: Behind the Iron Curtain of Scientology by Marc Headley. This is my third book about Scientology. This one and the next 3 I have stashed on Boris the Kindle are written by people who escaped. That's what "blow" means in Scientology Sea Org talk. You escape....you have "blown." Interesting stuff. I like this one in particular because the author joined up for a billion years at the age of 15 and escaped a very long time after that. The thing that the author does that I really like is that he writes at his age level at his various ages. Does that make sense? Don't get me wrong, it is all good writing but when I read about him at his age of 15 he is speaking like a 15 year old. I like that. In fact, I think that is one of the reasons I can easily identify with him. I like this book.

Last edited by Ketabcha; 02-05-2013 at 04:11 PM..
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Old 02-06-2013, 07:07 AM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,352,042 times
Reputation: 30253
I finished "The Book of Lost Things" which was way better than I expected even though I didn't go through all the "making of" by the author at the end of the book...

Now I'm a few pages into "Shopaholic Ties the Knot". I find this series really hilarious. How can anybody be so crazy about shopping?

And I started "Wide Acre" by Philippa Gregory which is really gripping.
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Old 02-07-2013, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,513 posts, read 6,335,587 times
Reputation: 7625
A friend lent me several books, two by Grisham - The Litigators and The Racketeer and one by Baldacci - The Innocent. I read all of those rather quickly because when someone is kind enough to lend books to me I want to read them and return them in a reasonable time.

From the library I got The Wolf in the Parlor by Jon Franklin. He explores the evolution of the wolf to the dog and our long time relationship with them. I will be buying this to add to my collection fo dog books.

I'm currently reading a couple of others from the library - the Gift of Pets by Bruce Coston, DVM and Daddy's Girl by Lisa Scottoline. I also got A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth. I read another by him An Equal Music and so thought I would take a chance on this very long novel (1349 pages).
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Old 02-07-2013, 06:51 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,471,072 times
Reputation: 14764
Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post
A friend lent me several books, two by Grisham - The Litigators and The Racketeer and one by Baldacci - The Innocent. I read all of those rather quickly because when someone is kind enough to lend books to me I want to read them and return them in a reasonable time.

From the library I got The Wolf in the Parlor by Jon Franklin. He explores the evolution of the wolf to the dog and our long time relationship with them. I will be buying this to add to my collection fo dog books.

I'm currently reading a couple of others from the library - the Gift of Pets by Bruce Coston, DVM and Daddy's Girl by Lisa Scottoline. I also got A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth. I read another by him An Equal Music and so thought I would take a chance on this very long novel (1349 pages).
You, and many others here, are a wonder to me. I could not read this many books in a month! Of course, I no longer seem to sit an read for more than a few minutes at a time. Seems like I am always drawn to do that next thing.

Still chipping away at "Mr. Darwin's Shooter." It immerses me in the 19th century of natural history discoveries. I think I was born too late.
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Old 02-07-2013, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
18,426 posts, read 18,477,268 times
Reputation: 28448
Dont read much at all, well not from books as I read a lot of history online.... but IM enjoying Trial of Madeleine Smith.. a true account of how this woman from a well to do family in Glasgow was arrested for the murder of her lover..
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