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Old 03-14-2013, 01:19 AM
 
Location: central Oregon
1,909 posts, read 2,537,499 times
Reputation: 2493

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Quote:
Originally Posted by miguel's mom View Post
I checked this series on wikipedia and amazon yesterday. And what a coincidence, instead of pushing the button to put the first book on my wish list I bought it via 1-click as kindle version. I was quite surprised to find an e-mail in my account that I had actually accidentally bought 16 Lighthouse Road. Well, now it's on my kindle waiting to be read. You don't know what it was good for I hope it will be a good read
I've read a few of her books and I love her fast and easy writing style. I really needed something simply fun to read for a while.
I'm almost done with The Land of Painted Caves. 16 Lighthouse Road is next and then on to the other 12~
The set looks weird sitting on my bookshelf... 11 of them are regular sized paperbacks, one is a hardback and one is a tradeback. (I'll eventually get them in paperback.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by bassetluv View Post
I'm a Stephen King fan, and the book I'm presently reading is his "11/22/63"; a story about the Kennedy assassination and a man who goes back in time to try and stop Oswald. Almost halfway through, it's a very good work of fiction.
Big SK fan here. I read 11/22/63 last year (got it for Christmas 2011) and loved it. I WILL read it again and again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
Half way through that one is like having read four other books. It is a chunky one, huh?

Actually, that was my first Stephen King novel and I really, really enjoyed it!

Have fun!
You want clunky Stephen King? Try reading The Stand!
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Old 03-14-2013, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
I'm still not finished The Dinner. I went out for dinner (ha!) with my Dad last night. It was a late night and I only read a few pages when I got back. I'm at about 90% and just finished reading about the "situation" in the principal's office. Seriously, if that had happened earlier in the book, I would have pitched it. So ridiculous.
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Old 03-14-2013, 06:12 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,205 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
Seriously, if that had happened earlier in the book, I would have pitched it. So ridiculous.
Never too late to pitch a bad book, IMHO.

I listened to portions of America's Hidden History on my commute yesterday, my second attempt, and dropped it to return to listening to The Death Collectors, which I'd dropped awhile ago because the collectors were so gross. I was feeling distracted, and the narrator of the latter has a nice range of voices or I might have dropped it, too.

I think I am going through a "just drop it" phase.

Meanwhile, still chipping away at The Girl Who Played with Fire, but cannot say it's one of my better reads, either.
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Old 03-14-2013, 06:30 AM
 
997 posts, read 1,060,655 times
Reputation: 2495
I'm about 30% through Snow White Must Die by Nele Neuhaus. Enjoying it very much so far.
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Old 03-14-2013, 08:31 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,700,000 times
Reputation: 26860
I finished Devil in the Grove by Gilbert King and can't say enough good things about it. It's a true story but reads like a John Grisham novel. If you don't know the tale I guarantee you won't see the twists and turns coming. It's emotionally draining, but overall a very worthwhile read.
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Old 03-14-2013, 10:34 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,200 times
Reputation: 7237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I finished Devil in the Grove by Gilbert King and can't say enough good things about it. It's a true story but reads like a John Grisham novel. If you don't know the tale I guarantee you won't see the twists and turns coming. It's emotionally draining, but overall a very worthwhile read.

That looks like a good one! Thanks for the recommendation. I'll look for it at the library or just break down and get it for my Kindle.
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Old 03-14-2013, 01:27 PM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,182,410 times
Reputation: 37885
Just finished reading The Rings of Saturn by W.G. Sebald. I enjoyed it from first to last, but I was wondering how to accurately describe the book. The publisher had decided that it is "memoir/travel/history," and it is all that, but I'm not sure that quite does it. It takes place on the author's unaccompanied walk along a thinly populated part of the eastern English coast, and because he is alone he dives, or is it sinks, into reveries and ruminations that conjure up Thomas Browne, Conrad, Swinburne, Edward Fitzgerald and the Ashburys, a family of Anglo-Irish eccentrics et al as companions...along with herring, silkworms... If it is about anything, perhaps it is about transistoriness.

Certainly Sebald is not walking the same path as Lawrence Durrell, or Patrick Leigh Fermor...perhaps the mood is akin to that of John McPhee's The Pine Barrens, but only akin. Someone on Amazon will do it more justice probably.

I was reading Roger Deakin's Notes from Walnut Tree Farm, and he mentioned liking it. I liked nibbling my way through Deakin's book and in the process had come to enjoy Deakin himself, so I picked up Sebald's book on trust.

Last edited by kevxu; 03-14-2013 at 01:42 PM..
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Old 03-14-2013, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,315,804 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Just finished reading The Rings of Saturn by W.G. Sebald. I enjoyed it from first to last, but I was wondering how to accurately describe the book. The publisher had decided that it is "memoir/travel/history," and it is all that, but I'm not sure that quite does it. It takes place on the author's unaccompanied walk along a thinly populated part of the eastern English coast, and because he is alone he dives, or is it sinks, into reveries and ruminations that conjure up Thomas Browne, Conrad, Swinburne, Edward Fitzgerald and the Ashburys, a family of Anglo-Irish eccentrics et al as companions...along with herring, silkworms... If it is about anything, perhaps it is about transistoriness.

Certainly Sebald is not walking the same path as Lawrence Durrell, or Patrick Leigh Fermor...perhaps the mood is akin to that of John McPhee's The Pine Barrens, but only akin. Someone on Amazon will do it more justice probably.

I was reading Roger Deakin's Notes from Walnut Tree Farm, and he mentioned liking it. I liked nibbling my way through Deakin's book and in the process had come to enjoy Deakin himself, so I picked up Sebald's book on trust.
I have a feeling that you might enjoy The Places In Between by Rory Stewart and An Unexpected Light by Jason Elliot. Then again, maybe you won't. I like them both very much and both are about men who walk alone for great distances explaining the culture as they walk. An Unexpected Light left me in tears at the end simply because it was over.
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Old 03-14-2013, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
Well! The Dinner never redeemed itself. In fact, the last 15% or so was the worst part of the book. I know that I said that I didn't love it, I didn't hate it, but it was okay. I take that back -- it wasn't okay at all. I really didn't like it. Really. REALLY.
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Old 03-14-2013, 06:38 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,348,993 times
Reputation: 1795
I read Courting Trouble by Deeanne Gist, Have a Little Faith by Mitch Albom and finally Wool by some guy whose name escapes me. Now I'm back to picking up books/opening books on the Kindle, reading a few pages and deciding "nah, not now" or "seriously, why did I buy this book?!" sigh.
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