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Old 05-31-2013, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903

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This is weird. The David Sedaris book is becoming a chore. Each story, within itself, seems to go off on tangents... or maybe I'm just not concentrating? I find myself searching for the funny lines but, if you're not really reading you don't have context, and you can't really find them, right?

I dunno. I think my brain is tired.
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Old 05-31-2013, 03:06 PM
 
11,113 posts, read 19,534,081 times
Reputation: 10175
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
QC -- I just saw your rep comment. Look here, though. I don't understand why Amazon is saying that they don't have it. They do:


The Best of Me: Nicholas Sparks: Amazon.com: Kindle Store
Well, how do you like that.... the last time I checked there was no "box" with any choices, that's why I called them. Thanks so much Dawn, I'll order it!
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Old 05-31-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
934 posts, read 1,127,927 times
Reputation: 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
The book is much better than the movie. Enjoy!

I dunno...I think I kind of liked the movie better. That happens sometimes. Usually not if you read the book first, but if you see the movie first, it isn't likely that you'll dislike the book. In this case, I think the movie captured some thing...not sure what, some flavor, or note, I didn't quite get from the book.
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Old 05-31-2013, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,316,797 times
Reputation: 9858
Has anyone ever read Philipp Meyer? I had never heard of him but saw The Son advertised and it looks very interesting. He's being compared to Cormac McCarthy. Ketabcha - it is set in Texas - you might be interested. He also wrote a book called American Rust. Both books sound like they would be spectacular and I think I will be ordering both of them but I wanted to check first in case anyone else has read him.

My brain is weeping after reading Dan Brown. I have only myself to blame.
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Old 06-01-2013, 07:01 AM
 
4,723 posts, read 4,414,855 times
Reputation: 8481
Well I finished Parnassus and really enjoyed it.
I never did get to the Supreme's at Earl's... but I did read the first few pages which seemed pretty good. I will likely reserve it again at the library.
I am now reading Happy Money which is really so good. Amazon.com: Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending eBook: Elizabeth Dunn, Michael Norton: Kindle StoreI should probably post it on the non fiction thread as well. There are a few books i have read in this genre, which I guess is economics/sociology/psychology etc. This is a very easy to read but thought provoking book. Another one I read and have recommended probably ad nauseum is Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely.
Loved it.
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Old 06-01-2013, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,315,804 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Has anyone ever read Philipp Meyer? I had never heard of him but saw The Son advertised and it looks very interesting. He's being compared to Cormac McCarthy. Ketabcha - it is set in Texas - you might be interested. He also wrote a book called American Rust. Both books sound like they would be spectacular and I think I will be ordering both of them but I wanted to check first in case anyone else has read him.

My brain is weeping after reading Dan Brown. I have only myself to blame.
I'm not familiar with Philipp Meyer, Netwit, but I just checked out both books and they both sound wonderful. Thanks for the heads-up.
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Old 06-01-2013, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
I really used to like David Sedaris, but I put Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls aside. I just can't continue. I'm thinking that it's because -- although that passage about white food and semen had me howling with laughter -- I just don't find funny books funny. Further proof: I started Where'd You Go Bernadette. The reviews were fabulous. I gave up at 2%.

Maybe it's not the "funny" that bothers me... maybe it's just the lightness. I need a deeper book, something with some MEAT, y'know.

Tonight, I'm going to start The Paper Anniversary by Joan Wickersham. It's a novel. She wrote the non-fiction The Suicide Index about her father's death, I emailed her, and we had a nice correspondence. I really enjoyed her writing style in that "story" of her father, so I'm hoping that this novel -- which was her first foray into writing, I believe -- measures up and isn't too light a fare for me.
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Old 06-01-2013, 04:04 PM
 
243 posts, read 452,459 times
Reputation: 562
I have to stop subscribing to this thread; I'm getting too many good ideas. I've been a lurker, but I had to pipe up and thank netwit for the mention of Philipp Meyer.

Quote:
Has anyone ever read Philipp Meyer? I had never heard of him but saw The Son advertised and it looks very interesting....He also wrote a book called American Rust.
I've never read Meyer, but thank you for mentioning his books, netwit! After reading their summaries, they are high up on my to read list.

I'm reading Parrot and Olivier in America, and it's really quite good. It immediately grabbed me, and Peter Carey's writing style is fantastic. If you've read Democracy in America, this novel may be of great interest to you (I haven't! I may have to give it a stab at some point now) because it's been billed as "an improvisation on the life of Alex de Tocqueville". I'm also excited to read Carey's True History of the Kelly Gang: A Novel.

Before Parrot, I tried to read Defending Jacob. I couldn't get into it, and after a several exceedingly boring chapters I returned it to the library. I tried to forge on because it has such high reviews, but it moved too slow for me and I just wasn't interested in the story or characters.
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Old 06-01-2013, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post

Tonight, I'm going to start The Paper Anniversary by Joan Wickersham. It's a novel. She wrote the non-fiction The Suicide Index about her father's death, I emailed her, and we had a nice correspondence. I really enjoyed her writing style in that "story" of her father, so I'm hoping that this novel -- which was her first foray into writing, I believe -- measures up and isn't too light a fare for me.
It's not going well.

PS. I hate quoting my own posts.
PPS. But I did it anyway.
PPPS. Only to say that it's not going well.
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Old 06-01-2013, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,515 posts, read 84,705,921 times
Reputation: 114974
I started reading The Power Broker today. It was published in 1974 and is the biography of Robert Moses, the man responsible for making New York City much of what it is today, for better or worse, by his road and park and housing developments. A coworker recommended it, and I politely said I would be interested in it (we are in the public transportation industry in the NY metro area) and he brought it in for me. It's nearly 1200 pages. He thought I would like it because he knows I like history.

So far, I'm about 100 pages into it, and it's pretty good. Won the Pulitzer back when it came out.
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