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Old 07-02-2013, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903

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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
Awe okay now i understand and yeah they closed the thread btw ....LOL thanks for the laughs .
Most of the posts were deleted. Sam and I had a good laugh about it this morning.
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Old 07-02-2013, 08:41 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,785 posts, read 18,820,798 times
Reputation: 10783
Charles Stross' Neptune's Brood. Sci-fi set far, far in the future. Interesting for its take on money and the economy and the use of slow, medium and fast money (fast money is what you use to go out to dinner or buy clothes, medium money is what you pay for yearly expenses in, slow money is what trades between worlds or ships transacts in).

He can get wordy and complicated and twisty, but I enjoy his books.
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Old 07-03-2013, 11:44 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
Reputation: 7237
I just finished Escape from Camp 14 by Blaine Harden about a man who was born and raised in a labor camp in North Korea before escaping and defecting into South Korea. Wow... it was a really powerful "story". My only complaint was that I felt like the author was purposefully holding back on any emotion in order to not exploit the horror of it all. There was almost too much restraint and it felt cold and unfleshed out at times.

The most interesting aspect was the comparisons between this young man who never, ever lived a normal life and children who survived concentration camps in the Holocaust who at least new life before their world fell apart. These children raised in North Korean labor camps are essentially raised by their captors without any knowledge of the outside world, family life, faith, politics...nothing.
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Old 07-03-2013, 07:17 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
My only complaint was that I felt like the author was purposefully holding back on any emotion in order to not exploit the horror of it all. There was almost too much restraint and it felt cold and unfleshed out at times.

The most interesting aspect was the comparisons between this young man who never, ever lived a normal life and children who survived concentration camps in the Holocaust who at least new life before their world fell apart. These children raised in North Korean labor camps are essentially raised by their captors without any knowledge of the outside world, family life, faith, politics...nothing.
It could be that with that upbringing, there just isn't any emotion to display. This isn't the thread for it, but I recently watched the PBS series, "This Emotional Life," and learned that people that are raised without affection are disconnected and live a curtailed life. Your interpretation of his reaction might be projecting your emotions being withheld, not his.
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Old 07-04-2013, 09:32 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
I'm loving Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver. Funny, great dialogue, interesting characters, thought provoking--highly recommend it.
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Old 07-04-2013, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I just finished Escape from Camp 14 by Blaine Harden about a man who was born and raised in a labor camp in North Korea before escaping and defecting into South Korea. Wow... it was a really powerful "story". My only complaint was that I felt like the author was purposefully holding back on any emotion in order to not exploit the horror of it all. There was almost too much restraint and it felt cold and unfleshed out at times.

The most interesting aspect was the comparisons between this young man who never, ever lived a normal life and children who survived concentration camps in the Holocaust who at least new life before their world fell apart. These children raised in North Korean labor camps are essentially raised by their captors without any knowledge of the outside world, family life, faith, politics...nothing.
I know exactly what you mean, and I think that was in part why when I posted about having read it, I couldn't quite find the words to describe it. Upon reflection, I think the distance is because the journalist who wrote the book was feeling his way around the young North Korean's story. He was writing as a journalist first and foremost, and it was his investigation of whether the elements in the boy's truly incredible story could be corroborated, coupled with maybe almost a feeling of fear (?) of this strange boy-raised-by-human-wolves that accounted for the distance.

If I remember correctly, although the boy lived in the US for a while, he didn't learn English very well and has since moved to South Korea. And he had told a number of lies (the one about not having had a hand in his mother's death being the biggest one), and I don't think the journalist wanted his own credibility attacked if something came out later that more parts of the boy's story was not true.

Plus, having grown up as the grandchild of immigrants who fled during the Russian Revolution, and having heard my share of Gulag stories, I thought I had heard everything about human cruelty there was to hear. Well, North Korea is far, far, far worse. The story was mind-boggling. I had my hubby read it too and he also had never read quite such a story.

(Mayberry, it wasn't the North Korean boy who wrote it - it was a journalist who wrote his story).
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Old 07-04-2013, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
I've been so busy -- oot and aboot -- but I'm finally on the last 100 pages of And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini. So good.
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Old 07-05-2013, 02:22 AM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,385,004 times
Reputation: 30253
I'm nearly through "The Twelve" by Justin Cronin. Great book but also quite slow at the beginning.

Can't wait to start "World War Z" and hope it's as good as the recommendation here said
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Old 07-05-2013, 02:40 AM
 
Location: Lone Star State to Peach State
4,490 posts, read 4,979,166 times
Reputation: 8874
Biography of Tommy Motolla.

Good stuff in there..
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Old 07-05-2013, 08:11 AM
 
43,631 posts, read 44,361,055 times
Reputation: 20546
I just started reading "River Town" by Peter Hessler which is about his time in the Peace Corps in China.
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