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Old 08-11-2013, 08:54 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,572,852 times
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Just started Bill Mauldin: A Life Up Front by Todd DePastino. It's a biography of a WWII cartoonist. A co-worker said it was great. I'll report back.
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Old 08-11-2013, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,893 posts, read 18,180,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
Just started Bill Mauldin: A Life Up Front by Todd DePastino. It's a biography of a WWII cartoonist. A co-worker said it was great. I'll report back.
I read his autobiography decades ago, Marlow. The Brass Ring-Sort of A Memoir. I highly recommend it. He wrote several books.

What a delight he was and such a talented cartoonist. He invented Willie and Joe who were a couple of G.I.s in WWII. I have great respect for him and for what he did to ease the lives of our guys in WWII.
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Old 08-12-2013, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,618 posts, read 86,477,948 times
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Up next: Ian McEwan's "Atonement".

I always though McEwan was over-rated, but still a good enough read.
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Old 08-12-2013, 04:35 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,572,852 times
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Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I read his autobiography decades ago, Marlow. The Brass Ring-Sort of A Memoir. I highly recommend it. He wrote several books.

What a delight he was and such a talented cartoonist. He invented Willie and Joe who were a couple of G.I.s in WWII. I have great respect for him and for what he did to ease the lives of our guys in WWII.
I'm enjoying this book a lot. Mauldin was born in 1921 and my parents were born in 1923 and 1925 and were both very poor during the depression. If nothing else, the author is painting an interesting picture of the era.
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Old 08-12-2013, 10:35 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,478,195 times
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Up next: Ian McEwan's "Atonement".

I always though McEwan was over-rated, but still a good enough read.
I'd not read him before, and am in the early stages of the audiobook though it isn't at all compelling. The movie was better, so far... he takes a lot of time telling a story. I keep finding other things to do rather than work on my crochet project because I don't feel like listening to it.

That, and I've been enthralled with Simon Beckett's "The Chemistry of Death." I just finished it and had to immediately reserve the second in the series: "Written in Bone." (I read the third, "Whispers of the Dead" first, and it was a good story, but I liked the first better.)

I suppose I ought to listen to "Atonement" since there are no other reserves on the Beckett story and it will probably be filled sooner than I can finish another book.
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Old 08-13-2013, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,224 posts, read 9,181,699 times
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I finished The Lost Gate by Orson Scott Card. I never get over the way he writes about children. He's simply exceptional at that. Then I read a memoir of an exchange teacher from the UK in Montana on the kindle app. It was well written and there were some humorous cross-cultural moments, but overall, the author came across to me as a whiner. I felt a little embarrassed for him at times. I can't imagine going to another country with his attitude. I couldn't tell in some instances whether he was using that understated British humour or not. Which, if that is what he was trying to do, instead of whining, missed the mark since one didn't know for sure. But I kind of lean to it being whining.

Now I'm well into The Lost City of Z by David Grann. He followed the expedition to the Amazon by Percy Fawcett. Note to self: stay away from the Amazon. I don't like bugs nearly well enough.
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Old 08-13-2013, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,224 posts, read 9,181,699 times
Reputation: 9783
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I'd not read him before, and am in the early stages of the audiobook though it isn't at all compelling. The movie was better, so far... he takes a lot of time telling a story. I keep finding other things to do rather than work on my crochet project because I don't feel like listening to it.

That, and I've been enthralled with Simon Beckett's "The Chemistry of Death." I just finished it and had to immediately reserve the second in the series: "Written in Bone." (I read the third, "Whispers of the Dead" first, and it was a good story, but I liked the first better.)

I suppose I ought to listen to "Atonement" since there are no other reserves on the Beckett story and it will probably be filled sooner than I can finish another book.
I'm going to check out that book. I assume it is about what happens to the body when we die?
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Old 08-13-2013, 08:58 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,478,195 times
Reputation: 14764
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I finished The Lost Gate by Orson Scott Card. I never get over the way he writes about children. He's simply exceptional at that. Then I read a memoir of an exchange teacher from the UK in Montana on the kindle app. It was well written and there were some humorous cross-cultural moments, but overall, the author came across to me as a whiner. I felt a little embarrassed for him at times. I can't imagine going to another country with his attitude. I couldn't tell in some instances whether he was using that understated British humour or not. Which, if that is what he was trying to do, instead of whining, missed the mark since one didn't know for sure. But I kind of lean to it being whining.

Now I'm well into The Lost City of Z by David Grann. He followed the expedition to the Amazon by Percy Fawcett. Note to self: stay away from the Amazon. I don't like bugs nearly well enough.
Just say "No" to whining! (Quote taken from my Personal Trainer instructor back in the day....)

I downloaded "The Lost City of Z" but it was just a casual interest while perusing the library's Kindle options and I haven't opened it, yet. I take it that the story is a "creeper" of a different sort.

Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I'm going to check out that book. I assume it is about what happens to the body when we die?
Netwit, the books are suspense-thrillers, though fairly minor as that genre goes. The protagonist is a forensic anthropologist with a doctorate in medicine. It's sort of a "cozy" thriller.
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Old 08-13-2013, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Indiana (USA)
73,760 posts, read 1,825,218 times
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Just started The Hard Way by Lee Child
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Old 08-13-2013, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,215,622 times
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Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post

Currently reading Big Brother by Lionel Shriver. This is glorious! Every sentence is finely crafted (I drive my husband crazy when I say that). It's about a woman in Iowa whose jazz musician brother comes to live with her and her family. She hasn't seen him in several years...has no idea that he has ballooned up hundreds of pounds. It's about many things, including of course obesity and our relationship to food. Her insight is amazing. Her characters are spot-on.
jazzcat, thanks for the recommendation on Big Brother. I've only read the sample, but have already decided it's going to be one of top ten books for the year. Have you read others by Shriver? I've put a hold on Big Brother, but I've downloaded So Much for That. I love this author's writing. It's wonderful.
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