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Old 11-23-2011, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,336 posts, read 28,382,941 times
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I just finished the book. As I said in the "What Are You Reading?" thread, it was the last page that killed me.

I found the story very interesting, especially how David Lurie seemed to evolve. I didn't buy into his daughter's logic for why she was staying on the farm and keeping --SPOILER-- but, then again, I've never lived in South Africa, so I don't know that sort of life.

The writing was excellent. The story fluctuated from interesting, suspenseful, haunting, and sad. Coetzee definitely knows how to weave a tale, that's for sure.
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Old 11-23-2011, 06:07 AM
 
13,515 posts, read 15,208,905 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I was not aware of this book. Thanks for starting the discussion.

I have not read a book about South Africa since reading Michener's The Covenent and that was many years ago. I just ordered Disgrace and I'm looking forward to reading it.
Another very interesting book on SA in the apartheid years is Doris Lessing's The Grass is Singing. I believe it was one of her earliest novel, I certainly read it quite awhile ago. It was one of those very controlled narratives that very quickly seemed ominous, and I remember having the desire to say, "Don't go there!" to the characters.
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Old 11-23-2011, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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re: the daughter, Lucy, I am halfway through the book, it is like she wants redemption for something...having the dogs as metaphor also breaks anyone's heart if you love dogs, or any animals...seeing the film made me HAVE to read the book....
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Old 11-23-2011, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 77,138,119 times
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Coetzee is a very good and under-rated writer. It has been a long time since I read "Disgrace", which I regarded at the time as an excellent read, but I can't recall many of the particulars.

There is no link between the quality of a book and the quality of a movie. One can be very good and the other very bad, and vice versa. A book is the application of literary arts, of which the plot is only a small part. A movie is a work of cinematic arts, of which the plot is only a small part.

It has become commonplace lately to make a movie of virtually every "good" book, and they are rarely worth watching, and are often downright painful if you have read the book. Conversely, some of the greatest movies have been based on very ordinary and unsuccessful books.
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Old 11-27-2011, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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well the film was odd, and Malkovich is an excellent actor. That said this is an excellent novel.

The film, the daugter was rather annoying, difficult to understand. The novel explicates it better.
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Old 12-04-2011, 12:00 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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I mostly hated this book. I picked it up this year b/c I saw it was a Booker Prize winner. The main character is a chauvinistic, womanizing jerk whom I felt little empathy for. People mention there was a movie, but I didn't have any idea, after reading this book I'll pass on the film version, LOL.
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Old 01-02-2012, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 7,275,908 times
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Just saw this film last night, having read the book a few years ago...it was disturbing at times. Those of us who are not from South Africa, IMO, have a very difficult time imagining the penetrating damage to lives and the difficult road back for blacks and whites after Apartheid.

I enjoyed the movie and thought J Malkovich was stunning in the role...he was far removed really, from Apartheid, being a self-indulgent professor, but his daughter was in the midst of it all....living out on the farm; struggling with the land as the locals did... Even through her trauma, seeming to understand/accept the anger and confusion and struggle of the young black boys and their families.

Perhaps she did feel some need for redemption as one of the white majority that kept the dark Apartheid in place for so long.

BTW: I watched the movie free on hulu.com



Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamofmonterey View Post
He uses the imagery of animals quite a bit, as a symbol..

I had seen the film recently it was interesting yet disturbing. Of course the character in the book being attached to a shelter dog, and then choosing to bring the dog to the vet to be euthanized is heart breaking. The Malkovich character (he is perfect for the role) as detached, trying to change his ways .....
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Old 03-08-2012, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,495 posts, read 24,426,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Just saw this film last night, having read the book a few years ago...it was disturbing at times. Those of us who are not from South Africa, IMO, have a very difficult time imagining the penetrating damage to lives and the difficult road back for blacks and whites after Apartheid.

I enjoyed the movie and thought J Malkovich was stunning in the role...he was far removed really, from Apartheid, being a self-indulgent professor, but his daughter was in the midst of it all....living out on the farm; struggling with the land as the locals did... Even through her trauma, seeming to understand/accept the anger and confusion and struggle of the young black boys and their families.

Perhaps she did feel some need for redemption as one of the white majority that kept the dark Apartheid in place for so long.

BTW: I watched the movie free on hulu.com
While the professor was not a sympathtic character at first (as above poster mentions) in the book he does try to relate to his estranged daughter, it was a very interesting perspective...

Malkovich was good as he is portrays a cold intellectual, but wants to relate to his daughter, Id recommend the book as well.
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