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Old 11-20-2011, 02:10 PM
 
3,147 posts, read 6,760,374 times
Reputation: 6131

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I just finished it and am filled with mixed emotions. Anyone read it and want to discuss it?


I loved the initial premise - 1790s - 1810s. A young Irish girl who's parents did not pay for their passage to America before they died so she becomes the indentured servant of the ship's captain. The captain takes her to his plantation home where she is raised and works along side the black slaves.

Unfortunately, the book has way too much going on through the years and it begins to feel like a rapid pace obstacle course. The writing style is simplistic and lacking any nuance or finesse All the action (and there is a lot of action) is just posted right out there for the reader to crash into: This happened, then this happened, then this happened... and so on, and so on...

So, with all of those negative comments, why did I finish the book and want to learn more about the characters? I suppose there was something I enjoyed about the book, but I'm having a hard time putting my finger on it.
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Old 11-25-2011, 04:40 AM
 
Location: on an island
13,387 posts, read 41,736,997 times
Reputation: 13285
The title sounds so familiar.

I have not read the book, but I too like the initial premise. I see it is in paperback, I might have to check it out.
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Old 01-28-2012, 06:25 AM
 
11,116 posts, read 16,256,608 times
Reputation: 10078
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I just finished it and am filled with mixed emotions. Anyone read it and want to discuss it?


I loved the initial premise - 1790s - 1810s. A young Irish girl who's parents did not pay for their passage to America before they died so she becomes the indentured servant of the ship's captain. The captain takes her to his plantation home where she is raised and works along side the black slaves.

Unfortunately, the book has way too much going on through the years and it begins to feel like a rapid pace obstacle course. The writing style is simplistic and lacking any nuance or finesse All the action (and there is a lot of action) is just posted right out there for the reader to crash into: This happened, then this happened, then this happened... and so on, and so on...

So, with all of those negative comments, why did I finish the book and want to learn more about the characters? I suppose there was something I enjoyed about the book, but I'm having a hard time putting my finger on it.

Agree totally; I am having a hard time getting through the first 50 pages. Getting all the various characters/names, nicknames etc., clear in my mind was daunting and I usually don't have that problem, just read on through smoothly. The book was rated 5 stars on Amazon and recomended by friends, so I couldn't wait to get into it. So far it's not a page turner by any means.
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Old 01-28-2012, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Virginia
90 posts, read 120,469 times
Reputation: 288
I read it not long ago.

Agree with you that the action seems to come at you from all directions. Maybe that's how life felt to Lavinia when she arrived at the plantation. Everything she knew had changed in an instant and she had no control over what happened next.

I liked the book. Also found the "why I wrote it" on the author's website very interesting. She said she sat down to journal one day and a scene came into her mind. It was the hanging scene, that became the prologue to The Kitchen House. She put it away but not long after that she heard about a family friend who family history included the story of Irish ancestors coming to this country on a ship. On that journey, the parents died and the two brothers lost track of their little sister. Kathleen Grissom knew that she had written the beginning of that little girl's story.
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