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Old 07-26-2013, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 77,698,159 times
Reputation: 36291

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You might try these.

Geraldine Brooks, "People of the Book"
Peter Carey, "Oscar and Lucinda"
Peter Carey "Parrot & Olivier in America"
Debra Dean, "The Madonnas of Leningrad"
Charles Frazier "Thirteen Moons"
Richard Rayner "The Cloud Sketcher"
Abraham Verghese, "Cutting for Stone"
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Old 07-30-2013, 01:59 PM
 
995 posts, read 960,256 times
Reputation: 1133
If you like WWII stories, read:

Amazon.com: City of Thieves: A Novel (9780452295292): David Benioff: Books

Funny, sad, heart-breaking coming-of-age story set during the seige of Leningrad by the Germans.
And yes, David Benioff is one of the co-creators and writers of HBO's Game of Thrones. <3
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Old 07-30-2013, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,120 posts, read 4,968,318 times
Reputation: 3283
I don't read that time period but prefer farther back.

Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon (2nd half of 18th century/20th century)
Sister Fidelma series by Peter Tremayne (7th century)
Dame Frevisse series by Margaret Frazer (15th century)
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Old 07-30-2013, 11:34 PM
 
243 posts, read 404,683 times
Reputation: 557
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Peter Carey "Parrot & Olivier in America"
Loved this book!
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Old 08-07-2013, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Bangor Maine
3,442 posts, read 5,859,606 times
Reputation: 3997
I loved all of Eugenia Price's books set in the pre-Civil War and during the Civil War. After I read her we went to some of the places in her books. Savannah and St. Simons Island. Saw where some of the characters in her books are burried. She based some of her books on the actual families.
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Old 08-13-2013, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
24,473 posts, read 16,482,079 times
Reputation: 18506
Quote:
Originally Posted by ebuch View Post
How was that Devil in a White City? Is it more like a history book or a novel? Sounds very interesting from what I have heard.
Eric Larson, is a very special writer. Devil in the White City is history, not fiction, and Larson is a historian. Primarily, the book is a history of the Great Chicago Exposition, one of the first great American fairs, and a precursor of the World Fairs that followed later.

The Exposition became known as The Great White City, because all the buildings were painted a creamy white color. It was a civic, architectural, and technological marvel that drew thousands of new residents into Chicago, which had just come back from the huge fire that burned the old city to the ground. It also drew millions of visitors.
The story is fascinating enough, but Larson also includes a full account of one particular person the Exposition brought to Chicago- a mass murderer, one of America's worst and one of America's earliest to become known. His methods of murder were some of the most bizarre ever.

The two separate stories are tightly woven. This is Larson's specialty, and his writing is like reading fiction; once into the book, it's one that is impossible to put down.
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Old 08-13-2013, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
24,473 posts, read 16,482,079 times
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A couple of years ago I got on a big kick of reading Civil War fiction, and discovered it's a very rich vein.

As our greatest conflict, the Civil War will always be fruitful territory for good stories of all genres. Gone With The Wind was pretty darned accurate in it's depiction of the ante-bellum South, even if it was a real bodice-ripper of a romance. Lately, there has been some Civil War horror fiction, which is particularly popular in illustrated novels. This genre is much more fictional than historic, of course.

Cold Harbor could be seen as a romance, or an adventure story, or a tragedy, all at the same time, and it too, is pretty historically accurate.

Here are some of my most favorites. I prefer historical accuracy over historically-base fantasy, and all below fill my bill.

Jeff Shaara continued his father Michael Shaara's fictional tales of the important battles of the Civil War. Both writers base their books firmly on history, and add very carefully researched fictional characters to make their books both immediate, fascinating and real.
Michael wrote The Killer Angels, and Jeff has written Gods & Generals, The Rising Tide, The Last Full Measure, and a stack of really great reading. I'm presently reading his A Blaze of Glory, on the battle of Shilo. Both writers leave me with a deep understanding of the events and the people who were part of them. All the Shaara books are much more battle accounts than close character accounts, so sometimes the reader doesn't really get to know some of the incidental characters very well.

Another exceptionally good writer is Howard Bahr. His fiction focuses on the Confederate soldiers and their struggles, and Bahr's characters are all more fictional, less historical, and are very vivid in their portrayals. He writes about the people much more than the battles, which are sometimes a fictional combination of several historical fights.

Bahr's magic is putting his characters right next to the reader. When you read one of his books, you know that soldier, and how he smells, what he looks like and his mannerisms, who his girl back home is, in very intimate ways. All of his books are excellent and all are gripping- so cinematic they are almost like watching a movie. His battle scenes are amazingly vivid.

I suggest starting with The Black Flower, but any will do very well. Bahr learned his history first-hand, as the curator of several museums in Mississippi.

Another good writer, but a bit less adept in his fictional conversations, is James Carlos Blake. He writes on the war in the far West- Kansas, Missouri, Texas, and the frontier. My favorite of his is Wildwood Boys, an account of Bloody Bill Anderson, the murderous Missourian who led a savage bunch of guerrillas who were pitted against an equally savage bunch of Federals.

Be aware that this is not a book for the squeamish- some of the descriptions Blake writes are as disturbing as the most graphic horror fiction.

Of them all, I think The Black Flower is, overall, the best of the bunch. It's one of those books that would be an Oscar winning movie if it was done well- equal in all ways to the very best Civil War movies ever made in it's scope and portrayals. It's a book i look forward to reading for the 3rd time.
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Old 08-18-2013, 06:46 AM
 
Location: So Ca
19,353 posts, read 17,511,473 times
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The Paris Wife by Paula McLain, based on the early adult years of Ernest Hemingway's first wife, Hadley Richardson Hemingway.
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Old 08-22-2013, 01:12 PM
Status: "Uncomfortably numb" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
64,674 posts, read 61,009,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourn View Post
I'm a fan of Caleb Carr and I really liked "The Devil in the White City".

I really enjoy thriller mysteries set at the turn of the last century.

Any ideas?
Your sentence makes it sound as if Caleb Carr wrote Devil in the White City.

Eric Larson wrote Devil. Caleb Carr wrote The Alienist, and I highly recommend it.

As someone already pointed out, Devil was nonfiction. BUT they are both about serial killers in large cities in the 1890s, so you were in the right ballpark!
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Old 08-26-2013, 11:39 AM
 
584 posts, read 1,017,104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ameriscot View Post
I don't read that time period but prefer farther back.

Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon (2nd half of 18th century/20th century)
Sister Fidelma series by Peter Tremayne (7th century)
Dame Frevisse series by Margaret Frazer (15th century)
Just in case you didn't know - "Outlander" is going to be made into a STARZ mini-series - for airing in 2014!!! Diana Gabaldon website has further information!! Awesome!! They already casted Jamie.
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