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Old 03-09-2017, 07:02 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,404 posts, read 1,979,519 times
Reputation: 4267

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Just read

The laws of medicine : field notes from an uncertain science / Siddhartha Mukherjee, TED Books, Simon & Schuster, c2015, 610.1 MUKH.

Subjects
  • Medicine -- Philosophy.
Summary
  • One of the world's premiere cancer researchers reveals an urgent philosophy on the little-known principles that govern medicine--and how understanding these principles can empower everyone.
Series
  • A TED original
  • Ted books.
Length
  • 70 pages ;
Based on his TED talk - very interesting, his philosophy on practicing medicine. Brief, easy to follow.
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Old 03-10-2017, 02:32 PM
 
Location: East Coast
3,863 posts, read 2,408,975 times
Reputation: 5899
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Just finished this gem:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillbilly_Elegy

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/11/bo...ove-trump.html

This really had nothing to do with Trump though, so the review in the NYTimes was misleading (imagine that). However, as Good Reads states:





https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...illbilly-elegy

Very well written - in fact, I couldn't put it down. I read it in two sittings!
Hillbilly Elegy was great. I also recommend White Trash. I read that after Hillbilly Elegy and it's different, but very illuminating on the same topic.
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Old 03-17-2017, 03:22 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
17,636 posts, read 6,022,577 times
Reputation: 14247
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
I just sadly finished reading The Incredible Journey by Tristan Jones, and what I hate about reading books like this is I get crazed, ravenous for a similar book to read afterwards, to get the same adrenaline rush, the same untold excitement and adventure!

I see he has previously written 2 other books, and I'll even risk going to prison to get my hands on those 2 books! Can't wait to read them!

What this man (is he even human?) endured on this ego trip of sailing from the lowest point in the world (Dead Sea) to the highest point in the world (Lake Titicaca in Bolivia) is nothing less than amazing!

Down the Red Sea to Yemen, then south around the Cape of South Africa, then across the Pacific to Belem, up the Amazon, where he had to turn around, then north to the Caribbean, then west to the Darien Gap, across the Panama Canal, south to Callao in Peru, transported the boat in the back of a Ford Pick-up, to Puno (Lake Titicaca), then east to Santa Cruz and thru the hellish Mato Grasso, then south to Asuncion and to Buenos Aires.

100's of close brushes with death, which will have your heart thumping like a jackhammer!

Trying to get a similar rush, I dived into a book about a trek around Macchu Picchu, which I put down after a few chapters (Boring in comparison!) and now onto a Paul Theroux travel book, Oceania, which won't give me nearly the rush, it will have to tide me over until I find another book I can get another good rush off of!
Thanks for posting this one. It's now on the top of my list.
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Old 03-17-2017, 05:53 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,120 posts, read 37,202,136 times
Reputation: 15576
https://www.amazon.com/Winston-Churc.../dp/B005NS30ZG

The best of its' genre IMO.
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Old 03-17-2017, 07:25 AM
Status: "Tell your loved ones you love them." (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
54,475 posts, read 42,652,770 times
Reputation: 75936
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
Hillbilly Elegy was great. I also recommend White Trash. I read that after Hillbilly Elegy and it's different, but very illuminating on the same topic.
LOL I ordered that a few days ago and it just came in! But I have about four books ahead of it!
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Old 03-17-2017, 11:02 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,404 posts, read 1,979,519 times
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Default England expects that every man ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Yah. Churchill was a slippery character. & FDR died in harness (a lot of the middle & top managers in US, UK & among the Allies died the same way - overwork, exhaustion, stress), so his POV is only recently being documented for the public. I'm nearly through

Commander in chief : FDR's battle with Churchill, 1943 / Nigel Hamilton, c2016, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 940.532 HAMI.

Subjects
  • Roosevelt, Franklin D. -- (Franklin Delano), -- 1882-1945.
  • Churchill, Winston, -- 1874-1965.
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- United States.
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- Diplomatic history.
  • Command of troops -- Case studies.
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- Campaigns.
  • Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- United States.
  • United States -- Foreign relations -- Great Britain.
Notes
  • Part I. A secret journey -- A crazy idea -- Aboard the magic carpet -- Part II. Total war -- The United Nations -- What next? -- Stalin's nyet -- Addressing Congress -- A fool's paradise -- Facing the Joint Chiefs of Staff -- Part III. Casablanca -- The house of happiness -- Hot water -- A wonderful picture -- In the president's boudoir -- Part IV. Unconditional surrender -- Stimson is aghast -- De Gaulle -- An acerbic interview -- The unconditional surrender meeting -- Ptv: kasserine -- Kasserine -- Arch-admirals and arch-generals -- Between two forces of evil -- Health issues -- Part VI. Get Yamamoto! -- Inspection tour two -- Get Yamamoto! -- "He's dead?" -- Part VII. Beware Greeks bearing gifts -- Saga of the Niebelungs -- A scene from Arabian Nights -- The God Neptune -- A battle royal -- No major operations until 1945 or 1946 -- Part VIII. The Riot Act -- The Davies Mission -- A dozen Dieppes in a day -- The future of the world at stake -- The president loses patience -- Part IX. The first crack in the Axis -- Sicily; and Kursk -- The Fuehrer flies to Italy -- Countercrisis -- A fishing expedition in Ontario -- The president's judgment -- Part X. Conundrum -- Stalin lies -- War on two western fronts -- The Fuehrer is very optimistic -- A cardinal moment -- Churchill is stunned -- Part XI. Quebec 1943 -- The German will to fight -- Near homicidal negotiations -- A longing in the air -- The president is upset; with the Russians -- Part XII. The endgame -- Close to disaster -- A Darwinian struggle -- A talk with Archbishop Spellman -- The empires of the future -- A tragi-comedy of errors -- Meeting reality -- A message to Congress -- Achieving wonders.
Summary
  • "Nigel Hamilton's Mantle of Command drew on years of archival research and interviews to portray FDR in a tight close up, as he determined Allied strategy in the crucial initial phases of World War II. Commander in Chief reveals the astonishing sequel--suppressed by Winston Churchill in his memoirs--of Roosevelt's battles with Churchill to maintain that strategy. Roosevelt knew that the Allies should take Sicily but avoid a wider battle in southern Europe, building experience but saving strength to invade France in early 1944. Churchill seemed to agree at Casablanca--only to undermine his own generals and the Allied command, testing Roosevelt's patience to the limit. Churchill was afraid of the invasion planned for Normandy, and pushed instead for disastrous fighting in Italy, thereby almost losing the war for the Allies. In a dramatic showdown, FDR finally set the ultimate course for victory by making the ultimate threat. Commander in Chief shows FDR in top form at a crucial time in the modern history of the West."-- Publisher description.
Length
  • xv, 464 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : index, chapter notes
(My emphasis)

Very interesting reading, I'm @ page 300 (of 400 pages of running text). Churchill was bright & talkative, & given to flights of military fancy. FDR stayed the course, & brought the Allies through WWII. Churchill kept trying to minimize UK & Commonwealth casualties - as if that were the point of the war. For a long time now, I've been leery of UK claims from their Empire on - this book fills in some of the gaps from WWII.

& Churchill was a gifted writer & orator - & somehow, his writing & oratory always floats to the top of his voluminous works. Sheer coincidence, I'm sure. & of course, he had a lot of time on his hands, once the UK booted him from power for the last time.

Anyway, it's worthwhile to get a different take on strategy in WWII. & FDR had a tremendous vision of the World post-WWII. A pity that he didn't live to see the end of the war.
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Old 03-23-2017, 01:59 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,404 posts, read 1,979,519 times
Reputation: 4267
Default Take 2 & call me in the morning

Shakespeare's tremor and Orwell's cough : the medical lives of greatwriters / John J. Ross, M.D., 1966-, c2012, St. Martin's Press, 820.9 ROSS 2012.

Subjects

  • Authors, English -- Biography.
  • Authors, English -- Health and hygiene.
  • Literature and medicine.
  • Authors, American -- Biography.
  • Authors, American -- Health and hygiene.
  • Diseases and literature.
  • Famous Persons -- Great Britain -- Biography.
  • Famous Persons -- United States -- Biography.
  • Disease -- Great Britain -- Biography.
  • Disease -- United States -- Biography.
  • Medicine in Literature -- Great Britain -- Biography.
  • Medicine in Literature -- United States -- Biography.
  • Writing -- Great Britain -- Biography.
  • Writing -- United States -- Biography.
Notes

  • The hardest knife ill-used : Shakespeare's tremor -- Exil'd from light : the blindness of John Milton -- Dying from the top down : The dementia of Jonathan Swift -- Some sweet poisoned breeze had passed into her lungs : the Brontës and tuberculosis -- Dismal labyrinth of doubt : the strange death of Nathaniel Hawthorne -- Perilous outpost of the sane : the many maladies of Herman Melville -- Sex and the dead : brucellosis, arsenic and William Butler Yeats -- Medical misadventures of an amateur M.D. : Jack London's death by hubris -- An infamous private ailment : the venereal afflictions of James Joyce -- "The disease which was bound to claim me sooner or later" : Orwell's cough.
Summary

  • The Bard meets "House" in this illumination of the medical mysteries surrounding 10 of the English language's most heralded writers, including John Milton, Jonathan Swift, and Jack London.
Length x, 291 pages : index, bibliography & endnotes

Very interesting reading - keyed by reading on J. Swift. Lots of medical background to many of our(English-speaking) famous writers. Good explanations from the author, a doctor. Amazing background information.
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Old 03-24-2017, 07:20 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,667 posts, read 4,815,956 times
Reputation: 5201
All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror by Stephen Kinzer
With a thrilling narrative that sheds much light on recent events, this national bestseller brings to life the 1953 CIA coup in Iran that ousted the country's elected prime minister, ushered in a quarter-century of brutal rule under the Shah, and stimulated the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and anti-Americanism in the Middle East. Selected as one of the best books of the year by the "Washington Post" and "The Economist," it now features a new preface by the author on the folly of attacking Iran.


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...the_Shah_s_Men
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Old 03-24-2017, 03:02 PM
 
Location: East Coast
3,863 posts, read 2,408,975 times
Reputation: 5899
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror by Stephen Kinzer
With a thrilling narrative that sheds much light on recent events, this national bestseller brings to life the 1953 CIA coup in Iran that ousted the country's elected prime minister, ushered in a quarter-century of brutal rule under the Shah, and stimulated the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and anti-Americanism in the Middle East. Selected as one of the best books of the year by the "Washington Post" and "The Economist," it now features a new preface by the author on the folly of attacking Iran.


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...the_Shah_s_Men
Read Bitter Fruit, also by Kinzer. It is about the 1954 coup in Guatemala. Excellent, excellent book. I have Shah's Men sitting on my shelf, but I haven't gotten to it yet.
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Old 03-24-2017, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Canada
6,047 posts, read 7,051,349 times
Reputation: 8652
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror by Stephen Kinzer
With a thrilling narrative that sheds much light on recent events, this national bestseller brings to life the 1953 CIA coup in Iran that ousted the country's elected prime minister, ushered in a quarter-century of brutal rule under the Shah, and stimulated the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and anti-Americanism in the Middle East. Selected as one of the best books of the year by the "Washington Post" and "The Economist," it now features a new preface by the author on the folly of attacking Iran.


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...the_Shah_s_Men
How old is that book? I saw a review on Amazon dated 2003 but I seem to remember reading that book many more years ago than that. But I couldn't locate the original publication date.
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