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Old 07-10-2018, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 7,506,177 times
Reputation: 30347

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I am currently reading Young and Damned and Fair - a biography about Katherine Howard, Henry VIII's unfortunate fifth wife.

https://goodreads.com/book/show/2943...amned-and-fair
From the review:


So far it is EXCELLENT - very well researched and well written. Considering that her upbringing was totally random and haphazard (and we don't even know the exact year of her birth, though she was a very high ranking Howard), and considering that she was executed so shortly after becoming queen and at such a young age (somewhere between 18 and 22 or so), the author has done a great job in piecing together tantalizing glimpses into her life and death.

I had forgotten that Anne Boleyn was actually a not too distant relative of hers, for instance. The Howards and Boleyns were related via marriage and it was a very interactive relationship during her childhood and her tragic marriage.


I had forgotten she was executed...

this sounds very much like a book I'd love....thanks
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Old 07-10-2018, 10:41 PM
 
1,738 posts, read 1,498,879 times
Reputation: 4089
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I am currently reading Young and Damned and Fair - a biography about Katherine Howard, Henry VIII's unfortunate fifth wife.

https://goodreads.com/book/show/2943...amned-and-fair
From the review:


So far it is EXCELLENT - very well researched and well written. Considering that her upbringing was totally random and haphazard (and we don't even know the exact year of her birth, though she was a very high ranking Howard), and considering that she was executed so shortly after becoming queen and at such a young age (somewhere between 18 and 22 or so), the author has done a great job in piecing together tantalizing glimpses into her life and death.

I had forgotten that Anne Boleyn was actually a not too distant relative of hers, for instance. The Howards and Boleyns were related via marriage and it was a very interactive relationship during her childhood and her tragic marriage.
Thank you for this! Today I started The Autobiography of Henry VIII by Margaret George and have five more books about the Tudors/Stuarts/et. al, in the queue. This one will fit in perfectly. I've added it to the list . . . perfect timing!
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Old 07-11-2018, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
54,373 posts, read 42,603,601 times
Reputation: 75627
Quote:
Originally Posted by movinon View Post
Thank you for this! Today I started The Autobiography of Henry VIII by Margaret George and have five more books about the Tudors/Stuarts/et. al, in the queue. This one will fit in perfectly. I've added it to the list . . . perfect timing!
Yay! You sound like me - I never get tired of reading Tudor history.

I just finished an excellent book about Henry VIII's third wife - Jane Seymour. Jane Seymour - The Haunted Queen by Alison Weir, who is one of my very favorite authors. https://goodreads.com/book/show/34020932-jane-seymour

By the way, I read that book you're reading now and it was really good. I have another recommendation for you that you may enjoy - this is a book I literally couldn't put down and when I was finally done reading it, I actually MISSED Sir Thomas More - I felt like I'd been spending time with him every day!
https://goodreads.com/book/show/6773...of_Thomas_More

I really like Peter Ackroyd, Alison Weir, Philippa Gregory, Tracy Borman, and Hilary Mantel when it comes to books about the Tudors, London, and British history in general. This particular book (Young and Damned and Fair) is written so well - some history books as you probably know are well researched but not particularly well written, but this author really breathes life into the history of Tudor times. Gareth Russell is the author - I am going to look up more books by him!
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,091 posts, read 7,506,177 times
Reputation: 30347
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Yay! You sound like me - I never get tired of reading Tudor history.

I just finished an excellent book about Henry VIII's third wife - Jane Seymour. Jane Seymour - The Haunted Queen by Alison Weir, who is one of my very favorite authors. https://goodreads.com/book/show/34020932-jane-seymour

By the way, I read that book you're reading now and it was really good. I have another recommendation for you that you may enjoy - this is a book I literally couldn't put down and when I was finally done reading it, I actually MISSED Sir Thomas More - I felt like I'd been spending time with him every day!
https://goodreads.com/book/show/6773...of_Thomas_More

I really like Peter Ackroyd, Alison Weir, Philippa Gregory, Tracy Borman, and Hilary Mantel when it comes to books about the Tudors, London, and British history in general. This particular book (Young and Damned and Fair) is written so well - some history books as you probably know are well researched but not particularly well written, but this author really breathes life into the history of Tudor times. Gareth Russell is the author - I am going to look up more books by him!
A Philippa Gregory book got me started on my love of reading Tudor. She and Alison Weir are just my kind of writers...plus I've learned so much without reading a dry history book...After reading The Six Wives of Henry XIII, now I want to focus on each one...
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Old 07-11-2018, 01:32 PM
 
1,738 posts, read 1,498,879 times
Reputation: 4089
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Yay! You sound like me - I never get tired of reading Tudor history.

I just finished an excellent book about Henry VIII's third wife - Jane Seymour. Jane Seymour - The Haunted Queen by Alison Weir, who is one of my very favorite authors. https://goodreads.com/book/show/34020932-jane-seymour

By the way, I read that book you're reading now and it was really good. I have another recommendation for you that you may enjoy - this is a book I literally couldn't put down and when I was finally done reading it, I actually MISSED Sir Thomas More - I felt like I'd been spending time with him every day!
https://goodreads.com/book/show/6773...of_Thomas_More

I really like Peter Ackroyd, Alison Weir, Philippa Gregory, Tracy Borman, and Hilary Mantel when it comes to books about the Tudors, London, and British history in general. This particular book (Young and Damned and Fair) is written so well - some history books as you probably know are well researched but not particularly well written, but this author really breathes life into the history of Tudor times. Gareth Russell is the author - I am going to look up more books by him!
You are a wealth of information. I really like Philippa Gregory, Alison Weir and Margaret George. The others I haven't read yet but since you and I are on the same wavelength, I'll check them out.

I just read a new author's book which had a comment on the cover by Margaret George stating "A novel as rich and golden as the coin she graced." Another comment referred to this book as a "must-read for Alison Weir-Philippa Gregory fans."

The book is Girl on the Golden Coin by Marci Jefferson. It's about Frances Stuart about whom I knew nothing. Really well-written and fascinating - there's quite a story there. She wasn't just a piece of fluff. I'll leave the rest of it to you to discover.
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Old 07-11-2018, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
54,373 posts, read 42,603,601 times
Reputation: 75627
Quote:
Originally Posted by movinon View Post
You are a wealth of information. I really like Philippa Gregory, Alison Weir and Margaret George. The others I haven't read yet but since you and I are on the same wavelength, I'll check them out.

I just read a new author's book which had a comment on the cover by Margaret George stating "A novel as rich and golden as the coin she graced." Another comment referred to this book as a "must-read for Alison Weir-Philippa Gregory fans."

The book is Girl on the Golden Coin by Marci Jefferson. It's about Frances Stuart about whom I knew nothing. Really well-written and fascinating - there's quite a story there. She wasn't just a piece of fluff. I'll leave the rest of it to you to discover.
And I will discover it - thanks for the heads' up!!!!!!!
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Old 07-12-2018, 03:56 PM
 
4,287 posts, read 3,304,461 times
Reputation: 9575
Quote:
Originally Posted by movinon View Post
The book is Girl on the Golden Coin by Marci Jefferson. It's about Frances Stuart about whom I knew nothing. Really well-written and fascinating - there's quite a story there. She wasn't just a piece of fluff. I'll leave the rest of it to you to discover.
Sounds great, I just bought it. I'm a big fan of anything set in France around that time.

I'm fan of Allison Weir too. I don't see a lot of books about Jane Seymour so I made a note of the one she wrote.

I saw that Katherine Howard book on Goodreads. Glad to to know it's a good one. I will add it to the TBR list as well.
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Old 07-12-2018, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
54,373 posts, read 42,603,601 times
Reputation: 75627
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rowan123 View Post
Sounds great, I just bought it. I'm a big fan of anything set in France around that time.

I'm fan of Allison Weir too. I don't see a lot of books about Jane Seymour so I made a note of the one she wrote.

I saw that Katherine Howard book on Goodreads. Glad to to know it's a good one. I will add it to the TBR list as well.
I love it so far. It's pretty thick and full of detail but very well written. Hope you enjoy it!
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Old 07-12-2018, 07:46 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,394 posts, read 1,977,137 times
Reputation: 4253
Default I am not a number

The assault on intelligence : American national security in an age of lies / Michael Vincent Hayden, 1945- , c2018, Penguin Press, 327.1273 HAYD.

Subjects
• Trump, Donald, -- 1946-
• Intelligence service -- United States.
• National security -- United States.
• Cyberterrorism.
• United States -- Politics and government -- 2017-
• United States -- Foreign relations -- Russia (Federation)
• Russia (Federation) -- Foreign relations -- United States.

Summary
• In the face of a President who lobs accusations without facts, evidence, or logic, truth tellers are under attack. Meanwhile, the world order is teetering on the brink. North Korea is on the verge of having a nuclear weapon that could reach all of the United States, Russians have mastered a new form of information warfare that undercuts democracy, and the role of China in the global community remains unclear. There will always be value to experience and expertise, devotion to facts, humility in the face of complexity, and a respect for ideas, but in this moment they seem both more important and more endangered than they've ever been. Civil war or societal collapse is not necessarily imminent or inevitable, but our democracy's core structures, processes, and attitudes are under great stress. Many of the premises on which we have based our understanding of governance are now challenged, eroded, or simply gone. And we have a President in office who responds to overwhelming evidence from the intelligence community that the Russians are, by all acceptable standards of cyber conflict, in a state of outright war against us, not by leading a strong response, but by shooting the messenger. There are fundamental changes afoot in the world and in this country. General Michael Hayden shows us what they are, reveals how crippled we've become in our capacity to address them, and points toward a series of effective responses. Because when we lose our intelligence, literally and figuratively, democracy dies.

Length 292 pages ; bibliographical references & index

An excellent primer on the value of intelligence & its parlous state in the US.
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Old 07-13-2018, 10:56 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,394 posts, read 1,977,137 times
Reputation: 4253
Default Beginnings are such delicate times

The First Congress : how James Madison, George Washington, and a group of extraordinary men invented the government / Fergus M. Bordewich, c2016, Simon & Schuster, 327.7309 BORD.

Subjects
• United States. -- Congress -- (1st : -- 1789-1791)
• United States -- Politics and government -- 1789-1797.

Notes
• Preface: Nebuchadnezzar's monster -- An ocean always turbulent -- The fostering hand of government -- A new era -- Pomp and quiddling -- A very perplexing business -- A great and delicate subject -- Vile politics -- Propositions of a doubtful nature -- Paper guarantees -- A centre without parallel -- Interlude I -- The labyrinth of finance -- A gross national iniquity -- The trumpet of sedition -- Cabals, meetings, plots & counterplots -- A southern position -- Indians -- Interlude II -- Freedom's favorite seat -- A most mischievous engine -- Epilogue: American dawn.

Summary
• "The First Congress was the most important in US history says prizewinning author and historian Fergus Bordewich, because it established how our government would actually function. Had it failed--as many at the time feared it would--it's possible that the United States as we know it would not exist today,"--NoveList.

Length xv, 396 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : chapter notes, selected bibliography, index

An excellent history, digs into the issues, the personalities, the sides taken. Very readable, an enjoyable exploration - & educational, to boot.
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