U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-10-2017, 03:22 PM
 
3,565 posts, read 2,054,597 times
Reputation: 2265

Advertisements

The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-11-2017, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
6,924 posts, read 4,237,050 times
Reputation: 3249
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCityTheBridge View Post
The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin
This.

I mean, this is a masterpiece.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 09:20 PM
 
Location: East Side
522 posts, read 606,448 times
Reputation: 601
N.K. Jemisin is a relatively new author in SF and is very good and writes massive books.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2017, 09:37 PM
 
578 posts, read 1,174,115 times
Reputation: 1264
I'll second the vote for Phillip K. Dick. Yes, his work was written decades ago. But for the most part, you can't tell that as you are reading it. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep is a must-read. (you know the movie as Blade Runner). His best work though is in his short fiction.

Post-Apocalyptic and thought provoking?
Wool by Hugh Howley
Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle's Lucifer's Hammer, The Mote in God's Eye, Footfall, Legacy of Hereot, and others.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2017, 05:56 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,120 posts, read 37,204,514 times
Reputation: 15576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCityTheBridge View Post
The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin
You beat me to it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2017, 06:01 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,120 posts, read 37,204,514 times
Reputation: 15576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsettomati View Post
First, I'd just like to say that I think post-apocalyptic fiction often gets shoehorned into the label 'science fiction' when most of it really contains no real futuristic science as part of its fiction. Anyway, that said...

The Road, by Cormac McCarthy
Years after an apocalyptic event (the novel doesn't spell it out, but in an interview the author says he imagined it was a comet hitting the Earth) a man and his boy travel through what was once the American South struggling to survive. Between all the dust kicked up into the atmosphere by the impact, and the smoke from the massive fires which followed, the planet is perpetually shrouded in thick clouds that block sunlight. No plants grow and the biological cycle has broken down. All that remains to eat are increasingly rare stores of canned goods from 'before'. And other humans.

To say that this book is searing understates it. Parts of it are a gut-punch, but never gratuitously so. McCarthy's prose is aching beautiful even when it concerns a wasted land, and the tale is gripping even as it is at its heart about love and innocence and hope over despair. The book transcends the post-apocalyptic genre. Highly, highly recommended.

The Road - By Cormac McCarthy - Books - Review - The New York Times

The Dog Stars, by Peter Heller
A decade after a pandemic kills almost everyone, the protagonist and his dog and his dour survivalist-type companion live at a rural airport north of Denver. He flies a Cessna, scouting nearby areas for game and intruders. And for years he ponders a brief message that came over his aircraft's radio one day, a snippet from the control tower at Grand Junction, across the state and beyond the there-and-back range of his small plane.

Eventually, yearning with the hope of some sort of order or semi-civilization, he decides to go to Grand Junction and search for the source of that message. Entertaining and thoughtful. Highly recommended.

'Dog Stars' Dwells On The Upside Of Apocalypse : NPR
Good suggestions; in the same vein, I would suggest Specimen Days by Michael Cunningham.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:14 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top