U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-22-2017, 07:06 PM
 
3,178 posts, read 6,815,965 times
Reputation: 6227

Advertisements

Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder - the true story of Dr. Paul Farmer and his quest to cure the world of TB. There are people in this world doing amazing, selfless things to better the lives of others. Even if we can't perform on that scale, we can all do what we can.

The Spirit Catches You and Then You Fall Down
by Anne Fadiman - Providing healthcare for people from other parts of the globe is more than calling for an interpreter.

Jonathan Livingston Seagull
by Richard Bach - I learned the power of an allegory. I was probably way to young to fully understand this book the first time that I read it, but my grandparents didn't stop me. I also learned the importance of not censoring a young person's reading material!

Tortilla Curtain by T.C. Boyles - we will never fully understand the struggles of others.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck - I cried when I read this in middle school because it was such an intimate look at how cruel people can be and I cried when my son had to read it in middle school because I didn't want his innocence touched in such a heart-wrenching way. I suppose that is why it is a classic, huh?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-22-2017, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,336 posts, read 28,681,224 times
Reputation: 28724
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post

Tortilla Curtain by T.C. Boyles - we will never fully understand the struggles of others.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck - I cried when I read this in middle school because it was such an intimate look at how cruel people can be and I cried when my son had to read it in middle school because I didn't want his innocence touched in such a heart-wrenching way. I suppose that is why it is a classic, huh?
Tortilla Curtain -- incredible book
Of Mice and Men -- y'know, I don't think that I ever read it; that will change
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2017, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
54,262 posts, read 42,569,645 times
Reputation: 75404
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Tortilla Curtain -- incredible book
Of Mice and Men -- y'know, I don't think that I ever read it; that will change
I just put Tortilla Curtain on my To Read List.

Of Mice and Men is such a fabulous book - and it's not a long, difficult book to read either. It's simple and yet profound. I love Steinbeck's spare, simple writing style. Wow, talk about every word being laden with portent - he can say so much in so few words. It's really a fantastic book.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2017, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,336 posts, read 28,681,224 times
Reputation: 28724
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I just put Tortilla Curtain on my To Read List.

Of Mice and Men is such a fabulous book - and it's not a long, difficult book to read either. It's simple and yet profound. I love Steinbeck's spare, simple writing style. Wow, talk about every word being laden with portent - he can say so much in so few words. It's really a fantastic book.
Thanks, KA, I just bought Of Mice and Men -- it's waiting for me on my Kindle -- but I want to hold off until after I move so that I can concentrate on it, rather than just read a page or two when I happen to have time. I'm looking forward to it.

I hope that you'll like Tortilla Curtain. I read it such a long time ago and I remember nothing except that it had a serious WOW! factor.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2017, 09:05 AM
Status: "Epter than the other day." (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
28,839 posts, read 15,249,482 times
Reputation: 13113
The Magic of Believing - Claude Bristol
The Ginger Man - J.P. Donleavy
The Painted Bird - Jerzy Kosinski
Dhalgren - Samuel R. Delany
Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72 - Hunter S. Thompson
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2017, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
54,262 posts, read 42,569,645 times
Reputation: 75404
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Thanks, KA, I just bought Of Mice and Men -- it's waiting for me on my Kindle -- but I want to hold off until after I move so that I can concentrate on it, rather than just read a page or two when I happen to have time. I'm looking forward to it.

I hope that you'll like Tortilla Curtain. I read it such a long time ago and I remember nothing except that it had a serious WOW! factor.
Just ordered it - and after reading the reviews and the synopsis, I wondered - have you ever read "House of Sand and Fog?"

The movie is good too but the book was absolutely riveting. It's about a clash of cultures and differing perspectives on the same situation as well.

Quote:
On a road crew in California, a former colonel in the Iranian Air Force sees a way to restore his family's dignity in an attractive bungalow available on county auction. But the house's owner, a recovering alcoholic and addict down on her luck, will fight for the one thing she has left. And her lover, a married cop, will be driven to extremes to win her love. In this masterpiece of American realism and Shakespearean consequence, Andre Dubus III's unforgettable characters careen toward inevitable conflict, their tragedy painting a shockingly true picture of the country we live in today.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...om_search=true
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2017, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
54,262 posts, read 42,569,645 times
Reputation: 75404
Oh my gosh, I have so many books. This is ridiculous. This thread is like book crack or something.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2017, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,336 posts, read 28,681,224 times
Reputation: 28724
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Just ordered it - and after reading the reviews and the synopsis, I wondered - have you ever read "House of Sand and Fog?"

The movie is good too but the book was absolutely riveting. It's about a clash of cultures and differing perspectives on the same situation as well.



https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...om_search=true
OMG! I loved that book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2017, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Southern MN
7,682 posts, read 4,389,549 times
Reputation: 27457
Book crack! I just bought another bookshelf for my bedroom. I feel like a book hoarder.


I just have to keep some of them and reread them because they have different interpretations for me at different phases of my life.


Here are a few of the most formative off the top of my head:


The Joy of Cooking by Irma and Marion Rombauer
Alive Miller's trilogy - The Drama of the Gifted Child, For your own Good and Thou Shalt not be Aware
People of the Lie by M. Scott Peck
The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich Bonhoeffer
My Mother, Myself by Nancy Friday
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2017, 10:56 AM
 
2,958 posts, read 3,510,165 times
Reputation: 4469
  1. The Hungry Spirit (Sir Charles Handy): Learned the principle of materialistic "enoughism"
  2. The Art Or Worldly Wisdom (Baltazar Gracian): An amazing book filled with practical wisdom, written by a 16th century Jesuit priest
  3. The Prophet (Khalil Gibran)A short book of prosed fables laced with eye-opening philosophical POV's
  4. Voices of Time (Eduardo Galeano): Book of vignettes which allow the reader to experience the wonders of life's small/common things through the eyes of diverse peoples
  5. Tuesdays With Morrie (Mitch Albom): A book that made me appreciate life, the elderly, and how there's nothing wrong with being #2
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top