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Old 04-25-2017, 01:56 PM
Status: "Tell your loved ones you love them." (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
54,474 posts, read 42,660,088 times
Reputation: 75951

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
convextech mentioned F. Scott Peck, too. Both of the books of his I've read did require future reading as I matured. People of the Lie was something I read when I was struggling with the problem of evil and it was helpful.


If you like Bonhoeffer, Kathryn, you probably also like Corrie Tenboom, a Dutch woman, who was imprisoned by the Nazis. Her subject matter continues to be timely.


The Alice Miller books I read in my thirties when I was looking for understanding and healing in my relationship with my parents. She knocks it out of the ballpark.


Sounds like all I read is self-help books, but au contraire.


The book that was most influential in my casual reading was handed to me by my mother once when I was home sick with the flu - In Sunshine and Shadow, a collection of short stories by Edgar Allen Poe.


Every year I treat myself to a volume of The Year's Best New Fantasy and Horror editedby Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling and The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror edited by Stephen Jones. Beach reading to raise eyebrows.


Thanks a lot, Mom.
LOL you sound like me - my reading is all over the place. Just this month, I've been reading about the history of underwear, the spread of opium and heroin addiction in the US, growing up in a Texas border town, and the lives of women in the court of Queen Elizabeth 1. So yeah, I'm sort of all over the place.

I DO like Corrie Ten Boom! I haven't read her stuff in awhile, but she's awesome.

You intrigue me with Alice Miller - may need to check her out.

As for your EAP thing, don't feel bad - I was sick at home once as a teenager and I got hooked on Sherlock Holmes. I think I read every single Sherlock Holmes mystery! And when I was a late teen and young adult, I was totally into Stephen King. Then he got redundant and weird and I went a long spell without reading any of his stuff, and then picked up 11/22/63 and realized that yes, he can still pull a good one out once in awhile!
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Old 04-25-2017, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Southern MN
7,740 posts, read 4,401,575 times
Reputation: 27747
I watched Stephen King's decline into alcoholism through his books for a number of years and was glad to see his subsequent recovery through his new, improved stuff. Bet he didn't know he was giving himself away.


We should start an eclectic readers club. A librarian once asked me if I picked up books for an institution every week because of the wide range of subject matter I checked out.


I'm wandering far off the line here but while I'm on a roll I want to recommend a book that's both a good mystery tale and a coffee-spitting, snot-snorting hoot guaranteed to chase the blues. Travels with my Aunt by Graham Greene.
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Old 04-25-2017, 05:06 PM
 
Location: BNA
570 posts, read 362,104 times
Reputation: 1458
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Good topic!

Off the top of my head and not trying to impress anyone:

1. The New Testament - Wow, Jesus was more acerbic than we usually give Him credit for being. I've read it several times over my lifetime and every time, I get different things from it.
2. CS Lewis' Narnia series - Like the New Testament, I've read this series over and over again, starting at about age 5 and then probably once every five years for the rest of my life. In fact, I'm due to read it again! The imagery, the allegory, the beauty of the writing itself, the introspection into one's own character - these books are chock full of ideals and philosophical concepts for every age group
3. Ray Bradberry's Martian Chronicles - This book (and his other books) made me think outside the box, so to speak. I read this book first at about age 12 and then read his other books over the years. I think these books shaped my morality quite a bit and really encouraged me to broaden my own ideas of the dignity of ALL of creation, the glory and the pitfalls of intellectual abilities, seeing things from different perspectives, etc.
4. The Good Earth - by Pearl S Buck. What insight into human nature! What a window into the soul!
5. Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand. This book encouraged my political and sociological musings and opened my eyes to bureaucracy and man's attempts at every level to control the thoughts and actions of others.

Wow, there are many more but those are the first ones to jump out at me in answer to the question. Another one which nearly made the cut is To Kill A Mockingbird. While I wasn't raised in an environment of prejudice, this book did showcase heroic actions and attitudes to me.

Yay! Someone like me.

I've read them so many times I have whole passages memorized.

I have a great idea for a rework, if the Lewis estate would ever approve it.
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Old 04-25-2017, 07:25 PM
Status: "Tell your loved ones you love them." (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
54,474 posts, read 42,660,088 times
Reputation: 75951
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xelfer View Post
Yay! Someone like me.

I've read them so many times I have whole passages memorized.

I have a great idea for a rework, if the Lewis estate would ever approve it.
I have whole passages committed to memory too!

What beautiful books.

What's your idea for a rework?
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Old 04-26-2017, 11:23 AM
 
533 posts, read 435,109 times
Reputation: 483
Loren Eiseley - The Night Country
Italo Calvino - Six Memos for the Next Millenium
Annie Dillard - Pilgrim at Tinker Creek
Jorge Luis Borges - Ficciones
Malaclypse the Younger - The Principia Discordia, or How I Found Goddess and What I Did to Her When I Found Her
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Old 05-01-2017, 08:47 AM
 
Location: midwest
1,452 posts, read 1,116,967 times
Reputation: 898
The Screwing of the Average Man (1974) by David Hapgood
http://www.buildfreedom.com/tl/rape10.shtml
http://www.amazon.com/screwing-avera.../dp/B0006W84KK

Changed my view of economics

The Tyranny of Words (1938) by Stuart Chase
Anxiety Culture: Tyranny of Words - excerpt
http://archive.org/details/tyrannyofwords00chas

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9H1StY1nU8

Changed my view of psychology and thinking

Games People Play: The Psychology of Human Relationships is a bestselling 1964 book by psychiatrist Eric Berne.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Games_People_Play_(book)

Altered perspective on relationships

Star Surgeon (1959) by Alan E. Nourse
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18492...-h/18492-h.htm
http://librivox.org/star-surgeon-by-alan-edward-nourse/
Review of Star Sugeon by Alan E. Nourse : SFFaudio
http://www.amazon.com/Star-Surgeon-A.../dp/1598180657

Started me reading SF at age 9 which introduced too many ideas to count

A Fall of Moondust (1961) by Arthur C. Clarke
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Fall_of_Moondust
A future that never came: Arthur C. Clarke’s A Fall of Moondust | Tor.com

Caused me to take engineering in college
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Old 05-02-2017, 09:05 PM
 
Location: South Central Pa.
154 posts, read 92,387 times
Reputation: 230
"The Peter Principle"

"The Hidden Dimension"
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Old 05-02-2017, 09:08 PM
 
Location: South Central Pa.
154 posts, read 92,387 times
Reputation: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I DO like Corrie Ten Boom! I haven't read her stuff in awhile, but she's awesome.
I saw her video many years ago, she had a very impressive message.
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Old 05-03-2017, 05:25 PM
 
3,565 posts, read 2,054,597 times
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This is an interesting topic. I find it difficult to reflect on the question because of recency bias. But I'll give it a go, admitting that I'm probably favoring books that I have read more recently:

Non-fiction
-1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus by Charles C. Mann

-The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan: I can never again look at food the same way as before I had read this book. Traces the origins of four meals: a fast food meal, an organic meal with ingredients supplied by a multinational corporation (e.g., Whole Foods), a local & sustainably developed meal, and a hunted & gathered meal.

-Against the Wind: Memoir of a Radical Christian by Dorothee Solle: a memoir by a woman who grew up in Germany during World War II. The most impactful pieces of the book reflected on the role of German Protestantism in facilitating the Holocaust.

-So Sad Today by Melissa Broder: an Internet age memoir by a poet who candidly discusses anxiety, depression, and self-consciousness, and loss. She manages to be poignant, tragic, and hilarious all at the same time.

-The Half has Never Been Told by Edward E. Baptiste: an economic history of American slavery, with reflections from the oral histories captured through the WPA. The sweep of modern history is caught here, in the industrial enslavement aimed at profit without regard for human costs.

Fiction
-2666 by Roberto Bolano: a horrifying, unsettling, and sprawling novel that details exploitation in the post-modern era--and links it to the traumas of WWII. Also tells a fictionalized version of a true story that I had never known: the killing of thousands of women in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

-To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf: my favorite modernist in any art form, and my favorite of her novels.

-Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison: there are several images from this book seared into my mind like few others can manage.

-The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin: what if a people had just one gender? How would you interact with them having lived your life in a world with two? Phenomenal world building and a thoughtful examination . . .

-Poems by Emily Dickinson: there's more in each than the eye perceives. Dwell in possibility with the greatest American poet--and fall in love with the form.
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Old 05-14-2017, 06:57 AM
 
Location: n/a
1,189 posts, read 887,005 times
Reputation: 1343
Curious George - Margret Rey and H. A. Rey

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - James Joyce

The Idiot - Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Small is Beautiful
- E F Schumacher

The Last of the Just
- André Schwarz-Bart
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