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Old 07-28-2017, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post

When the library is too big, do you dedicate yourself to reading through it or just bite the bullet and get rid, unread?

When that happens to me I go through the books I have and see if I can borrow them from my local library. If I can then I get rid of those books especially fiction.

When the library is too big, how do you get around all those books that have been read and are now potential reference items?
I keep too many reference type books. Those can be harder to cull. I would get rid of any of the older and maybe obsolete ones. Also get rid of the ones that are repetitive with other books you have. I have a serious cookbook problem. I am trying to go through them and copy the individual recipes that I either like or think I "might" use. Then I can donate the book. All of those will go into a binder of my own.
Congrats on the move and good luck.
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Old 07-28-2017, 04:51 PM
 
Location: SoCal
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If you can read a novel at a couple seconds a page I don't see the point in reading it. It's like getting sex over as quickly as possible. Reading is supposed to be enjoyable.

It's possible speed reading might be useful for textbooks if you can retain the information.
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Old 07-28-2017, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovehound View Post
If you can read a novel at a couple seconds a page I don't see the point in reading it. It's like getting sex over as quickly as possible. Reading is supposed to be enjoyable.

It's possible speed reading might be useful for textbooks if you can retain the information.
It's one of those things like when you borrow a book off someone's desk for an hour or so. Did that with Silence of the Lambs back in the 80s.

But you are right for the most part.

As to the issue at hand, no real solutions as I said earlier than just read, read, read....which I will get back to after I get done with my evening message traffic.

A few items. A book I finished earlier in the week....didn't really finish. While it didn't say on the cover, "Book 1 of the Dr. Dimension trilogy!" that is what it turned out to be. Well, it was a nice book but not that nice and I'm not going to go out and hunt up the other volumes. As far as I am concerned, the story ended where it ended with the last page of the book.

It did inspire me to look up the classic writers such as E.E. Doc Smith and Jack Williamson....which leads us to the next paragraph.

ALAS! I went to the bookstore again, bought more books to read. When I asked at the counter, they suggested looking at the Net to see if there was anyone I could donate, send books to. My concept is "troops overseas"....but I am probably dreaming 3 decades back.

There were no Doc Smith or Jack Williamson books at the store, though. As far as some of the books I did come across, there were at least two prizes such as a book on actor Brian Blessed and a Jack London.

It had to happen sooner or later but the book I blindly picked up to read out of a box is a story I read back in 4th grade. I didn't recognize the title, the book was a different cover and different master title, but two paragraphs in, I remembered. As it is, I don't remember much, so I continue to read. Back then, it was one of those double books and I recall more of the flip side book than this one....but I don't think I have that one.

I am approaching my reading with eyes rolled in a little in that the book, fiction anyhow, needs to really have a reason to keep it. As it is, a lot of books probably will but if the book doesn't, it will go into that box to be donated....if I can ever find a place.
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Old 07-29-2017, 06:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
I was reading over //www.city-data.com/forum/gener...whirlwind.html and there was a note there about realizing I have too many books, that I need to read them and get rid of them.............................and then remembering that it was never done.

Well now I am unpacking all the boxes and oodles and oodles of books, especially paperbacks, are being double stacked on the shelves.

When the library is too big, do you dedicate yourself to reading through it or just bite the bullet and get rid, unread?

When the library is too big, how do you get around all those books that have been read and are now potential reference items?
Ahh, every book lovers dilemma. It's hard to get rid of our passions. I love the books in my office, they cover every stage of my life. But then I found every time I needed to use the computer I had to move 50 lbs of books just to get to the keyboard. Fortunately in my second career I'm a public librarian, and all librarians learn collection development...or weeding.

First I focused on fiction books I hadn't read in 40 years, especially the bloated science fiction collection from my teens. I allowed myself to keep five. Then 30 years and 20 years. I allowed myself to keep more. Then I went by category, such as sailing, science, geology and biographies. I allowed myself to keep a couple favorites. Sentimentality is my downfall. I just put the book in a box that then ends up in the garage for 10 years.

I donated everything to my library which sells the books, so I know they're going to good homes. Then I went through my regional cookbooks. I have a passion for cookbooks produced and sold at church sales, nothing reflects an area's cuisine more.

I still ended up with over 300 books, but now I have room to buy more!

Last edited by Dockside; 07-29-2017 at 07:03 AM..
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Old 07-29-2017, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockside View Post
Ahh, every book lovers dilemma. It's hard to get rid of our passions. I love the books in my office, they cover every stage of my life. But then I found every time I needed to use the computer I had to move 50 lbs of books just to get to the keyboard. Fortunately in my second career I'm a public librarian, and all librarians learn collection development...or weeding.

First I focused on books I hadn't read in 40 years. I allowed myself to keep five. Then I went by category, such as sailing, science, geology and biographies. Allow yourself to keep a couple favorites...don't be sentimental! You'll just put the book in a box that then ends up in the garage for 10 years.

I donated everything to my library which sells the books, so I know they're going to good homes. Then I went through my regional cookbooks. I have a passion for cookbooks produced and sold at church sales, nothing reflects an areas cuisine more.

I still ended up with over 300 books, now I have room to buy more!

Ohhhhhh, Friends of the Library Sales! Mom took me to those, we had a common passion, and a lot of the books I have are from there.

Funny you should mention books not read in 40 years for that rather fits into the book I am currently reading that I read in 4th grade. That rather fits the 40 year mark......sort of. Probably the closest to that are all my Doctor Who novelization books and the James Blish ST:TOS ones. The latter get reread more times than the former...but that can always change.

Some books are easier to say bye-bye to than others, such as computer technology or those psychology annuals I picked up outside a prof's office. They do, however, have one last chance at redemption in that whether or not they can function as a shelf end, to stop things from falling out and off, on the steel shelves. Those are mostly up in the video library though they also end up as garage shelves.

I suppose I could assign a category of how did I come by the book such as if it was a freebee outside someone's office or a brother's college book that somehow made it my way.

A toughie is to decide to read this or that to begin with. I look up and see a Clancy on the shelf and they say he wasn't as good later as he was earlier, so do I really need to read that one? Then, I squint, see it is Patriot Games, and maybe I do.

On the other hand, one Robin Cook tends to be like another, so perhaps I don't. Seriously, one is like another so if there was one writer I would turn my back on, it would be Cook.

I ought to also look to see if this or that paperback is included in a collection. I think Trevanan's Summer of (whatever), the paperback, is in a hardback of 4 (Eiger, Loo, Summer?, ?) but first I need to find that hardback. On the other hand, I saw a collection of David Brin's the other day......but I can't part with the artwork of the single paperback of Startide Rising. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...281stEd%29.jpg

Then, there are those books which I know I have a few duplicates of like Cyborg, Casino Royale (that, too, may be in a hardback collection as well) and a few John Carter of Mars (never know just which ones you have, doncha know?).

One thing that would be ideal would be to place all the like books, like Crystal Singer, together. Space is at a premium, however, so books get placed on the best fit to the shelf.

People say that if one hasn't touched this or that in a year, then they don't need it.I suppose I might take that a step or two further that if I hadn't referred to it in thought, then I don't need it. So I might keep "I am Jennie" (Jennie Ketcham-"Penny Flame") more than "Underneath it all" (Traci Lords) more than "Here's the Story" (Maureen McCormick). Equally, to make it "easier", I might start a computer file of the reference items in each book, so then I can get rid of the book, like those in "Fleetwood" (Mick) and "Every little thing" (Patty Hearst). That might be a way, at least for the biographies. Another daily task that one would be.

Tips, tips, tips!
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Old 07-29-2017, 09:02 AM
 
Location: SoCal
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TamaraSavannah:

I like that this topic has become more interesting with yours and the succeeding posts. I've seen a lot of my old "friends" (books, authors) mentioned!

Ah, Silence of the Lambs. I read it and 1-2 sequels and finally decided to stop reading Thomas Harris. He was good (probably great) but just too scary for me! — He's the only good author I've ever quit because he was so good his novels creeped me out!

I agree that if a series is good enough to read and you have only the debut, you have to decide to either read the entire series or just skip it entirely. I wouldn't waste that much of my life reading a series I don't like at several hours per novel. It's all or none.

I remember "Doc" Smith. I don't know how long copyrights last but perhaps he's in public domain now and available as ebooks on free book sites. On the other hand, also likely to have disappeared off library shelves (and out of print) as the original books probably wore out long since. Don't forget that there are new SF novels and authors, perhaps it's better to let the past alone and sample contemporary SF. Get library books. You don't have to store them.

Thanks for reminding me of the double books, back-to-back with a cover on both sides. I had forgotten them. Two things: (1) although long since the 4th grade, I started perhaps 20 years ago keeping a list of all books read (author, title, rating, date completed) because I often discovered that my library visits ended with me taking books home and discovering I had already read the book. I put the list online and my last act at the library was to vet my latest selection and weed out the ones I'd already read. Call it a reading diary. (2) That's what I've been saying, what reason to keep fiction you've already read? How often do you read the same novel twice, on purpose? You can get all but the oldest at the library anyway.

Docside:

It sounds reasonable to keep a few books just for sentimental value. Mine are Tolkein's Hobbit and his Trilogy, hard cover gifts from my mother. I doubt I'll ever read them again since I'm still into fantasy but not medieval fantasy. Maybe one day they'll end up donated. Four books is no bother to store on a shelf.

I have a permanent non-fiction reference collection on three of my hobbies, cooking, art and soapmaking. The soapmaking may go some day since I mastered the craft years ago, I'll keep the cookbooks and art books since both are active hobbies. My "keeper" books occupy one Ikea shelf in my office, there's ample room to store more although I haven't added anything for perhaps 5 years. My "library" occupies just that small area in my office (6 feet tall) and that's all the books I need to keep. The bookshelf is perhaps two-thirds full, if that.

As I previously said, ebooks may not be right for all but they're right for me. I don't even go to libraries any more except when required to present proof to renew my card. I mostly read ebooks from libraries and purchase a few on Amazon. They store themselves, so if I ever want to re-read one of them I can either re-download from Amazon or check out again from the library. Ebooks don't wear out so either way I will probably have access to them for the rest of my life, "if" I ever choose to re-read a novel. Actually I have a few favorite series I'm considering re-reading the debut novel.

TamaraSavannah:

Computer technology, LOL! The only magazines I kept were the ones I published articles in. I even made a cover blurb a few times. They are souvenirs of course. Old computer technology is good for nothing but nostalgia. Retired from engineering now 10 years (I retired early) everything I know is obsolete, any books I had are obsolete. They departed years ago. — I minored in psychology in college. Same thing... The psychology I learned forms a basis for my understanding of psychology today, but the books are obsolete, the theories obsolete or modified beyond recognition. I keep up on psychology online now.

Tom Clancy was good until he turned his books into a franchise, written by Clancy collaborating with some other writer. Obviously Clancy formed the story ideas and the collaborator was a "gifted" typist. Clancy made so much on his original books and the movie deals that he must be almost as rich as God. Why not milk the franchise with minimal effort on his part? Only the originals before collaboration are worth reading. None are worth keeping. They'll always be at the library if you want a re-read.

Your collections and anthologies may be worth keeping if you think you'll ever re-read them. These are likely to go out of print and worn out and discarded at libraries. These are the most likely you'll never again have access if you get rid of them now.

I doubt I'll ever buy another physical book. My collection has already been winnowed to a manageable size (one bookshelf). There's a good chance I may pull some of them and donate them to a local library for their book sales. At least the meager money collected will go to support buying more new books.
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
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Well, as stated before, there are just too many reasons of why I keep to physical books. Thursday pointed out another reason in that I get an additional 10% discount at half price since I have an educator's card.

As far as books I read and reread, "Under the City of Angels" is one of them. "Alien" can be another. Cyborg, Casino Royale, From Alice to Sea, Han Solo (in the Corporate Sector), The Andromeda Strain, Beyond the Poseidon Adventure, Crystal Singer, other McCaffrey books, The Eiger & Loo Sanctions, Wilbur Smith books, and I guess the list goes on and on.

Part of thing of that list is to refeel the awe I felt when I first read the story, such as Robin Scott Wilson's "Gone Fishin" which I read in an analogy (maybe "The Year's Best Sci Fi"-1973 (it's somewhere in the library)). Now, granted, I was an early teen, we were going over seas again, and perhaps I needed something to "hold on to".....but I still like the feeling I had then for the story.

Psychology doesn't necessarily go out of date. There is still something to Freud, after all. As far as computers go, well the approach to hardware has changed (unless one is in Mexico or Turkey*) but software languages vary. I mean, I use C in code crunching, ripping apart web pages, and GIS applications still.

*1979 My introduction to nuclear engineering prof goes off to a conference in Turkey. There in a presentation, the Turks talk about what they did, of having to go step by step. The scientist from France gets up says you don't have to do it that way, just use this new fangle dangle computer and save yourself so many steps. The Turks say, you don't understand, we don't have the money for that kind of system, so we use the older system and go through all these steps. Hence, don't expect that everyone is up to date as you are.

The thing about E.E. is that I never really read him. There was one paper back of his growing up and then, there is what I read about his works in Heinlein's "The Number of the Beast" (which is another book I read over and over). Jack Williamson, however, I have read, first with "People Machines" as a teen (a copy that is somewhere around) and then, at least, "Beachhead" a few years ago.

As to the modern writers, well, that's the blessing and that's the curse. Here's a short list of some of the books I picked up on Thursday from "the bargain bin": Jacqueline Carey's Kushiel's Scion; Melina Morel's Smolder; David Chandler's A Thief in the Night (book 2 of that trilogy but oh well); Janet Morris's Beyond Wizardwall (book 3 in the trilogy but oh well); Patricia Briggs's Bone Crossed; A. C. Crispin and Katheen O'malley's Starbrige: Silent Dances.

Books that on the face of it suggest women, witchcraft, & firebrands....to say the least. Things to play to my fantasies. I just look at the cover and make my decisions on that.

WHICH, by the way, is a nice thing about having course work in art history. If I see a book cover where Michael Whelan did it, I know his work is representative of what is inside the book. If I see one where Boris Valejo did it, it is very hit and miss to what is inside.

The art work on the cover is a big thing to me for as I read, it can me a jump off point for my dreams....or a point to always to return to, such as the previously given "Star Tide Rising".

One genre of books I probably won't buy any more of nor keep when I finish them are the Pocket Books ST:TOS ones for so many of them just come across as fan fiction. "Dwellers in the Crucible"? Oh, god, that book was terrible. Maybe Demons! (which for a Boris cover was somewhat representative....somewhat) and Bloodthirst, but most of them are pretty amateurishly written.

Tummy's growling, time for lunch....and other things away from the computer.
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:32 AM
 
Location: SoCal
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Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
Psychology doesn't necessarily go out of date. There is still something to Freud, after all. As far as computers go, well the approach to hardware has changed (unless one is in Mexico or Turkey*) but software languages vary. I mean, I use C in code crunching, ripping apart web pages, and GIS applications still.
Psychology is like any other science, built upon the preceding layers.

In my career I designed electronic hardware and wrote firmware and software, some for PCs. With the advances since I retired my entire knowledge is obsolete (in such a short time). I amuse myself writing PHP etc. for web servers and websites since my hardware is sometimes not even on my same continent. My electronic lab is useless.

Oh I fixed my iPhone six months ago but it wasn't much more than replacing a broken part and putting back screws I can't see except under a magnifier. There's another project for me, I have all the knowledge, parts and tools to build new embedded systems using technology almost 10 years old. It's totally useless. I am useful for little more than replacing a frayed lamp cord. It's time for me to have a serious talk with my electronics inventory and acquaint most of it with my trash can. That's why I work on Internet code, because it's just code, only code, nothing else but code. I can always code and learn new languages. I spent my career doing that.

I lost count of the number of computers I've built. I did my own over and over, did friends' computers, earned side money building computers for friends of friends. The laptop I'm on is the first computer I didn't build. It's not productive to build your own any more, and anyway I've realized there is no need for a desktop and neigh impossible to build a laptop. Another obsolete skill, yet also an opportunity: I have plenty of computer parts that can join the electronic inventory in the trash. (Or recycled, whatever.)

To bring it all together, I think we all have to periodically examine the physical baggage we are carrying around or storing, and weed out what is no longer useful. That's the only way we can avoid becoming hoarders. Take hoarding too far and it starts looking like some psychological disorders.
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Old 07-29-2017, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Mars City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
...how do you get around all those books that have been read and are now potential reference items?
I don't see books that are read and a "potential reference" as a negative. In fact, I highlight a lot of my books (which are almost always non-fiction) and love when they've been gone through and highlighted. Then later, I can go back through them and hit the high points without having to reread them in entirety. They go way up in value - personally - when I'm finished them the first time. I'd never get rid of those books.

I usually just get rid of books that are of less use and value, and have less "staying power".
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Old 07-30-2017, 01:19 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
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Originally Posted by Lovehound View Post
Psychology is like any other science, built upon the preceding layers.
.......
As is just about anything else, built on layers, but I have found that as our world moves on, often those layers become nothing more than a foot note.......and for some of the things I do, that's not helpful.

A number of years ago, I was doing a research project concerning hostage rescue and a key element in the background research was Entebbe and the Israelis. I couldn't find anything useful for it had all been reduced to a paragraph, a footnote. I think my most informative source was a chapter out of https://www.amazon.com/Herk-Skies-Jo.../dp/091487540X

Eventually, I was able order two or three books directly on the subject and those are in the library now....somewhere (still unpacking, doncha know).

A little humor there on what I may do research on this or that year. Two or three years back, I was checking out of 1/2 Price books with my educator card. I had books on hostages and security, art, scuba, and biology (or something like that). The cashiers were trying to figure out just what kind of professor I was!

Once burned, twice shy.

Last edited by TamaraSavannah; 07-30-2017 at 01:40 AM..
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