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Old 06-08-2019, 06:53 AM
 
Location: City Data Land
16,376 posts, read 9,800,587 times
Reputation: 31796

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2x3x29x41 View Post
I do.

We have a very nice one in our town, and it's always full of shoppers when I'm there. The chains - Waldenbooks, B. Dalton, Borders, Barnes and Noble, etc. - have really been hurt by Amazon. The independent bookstores? Not so much. They were hurt by the rise of the chains in the 1990s, but now they're filling the niche left by the gutting of the mall stores.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/once-en...booming-again/
https://whyy.org/articles/independen...cross-the-u-s/
As big chain bookstores struggle, independent booksellers in Spokane area and elsewhere enjoy a resurgence | The Spokesman-Review

Amazon hurt the chains because the chains offer inventory, inventory, inventory. Well, so does Amazon, and to a greater extent than a brick-and-mortar ever could. Also, immediacy. But with next-day-shipping and the ability to shop from home, Amazon has more advantages.

But the independent bookstore? It offers customer service but a local owner/operator. Amazon can't compete with that. Boutique businesses offer service. There's always a niche for that.
We have a Half Price Books in our town and it is chock full of business all day every day. I don't buy books from there often because they are far more expensive than the same books online (not Amazon, other retailers.) But when I get a coupon from them I always shop at the Half Price Books. I want to support brick and mortar when it benefits me. B&N would have benefited from selling used stock in the store. Many people will buy used books when they won't buy new ones.
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Old 06-08-2019, 03:05 PM
 
Location: East Coast
3,832 posts, read 2,358,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
You're in the minority, however. Many people browse at Barnes and Noble, sit in those chairs, buy coffee, go through books, then walk out. Apparently a lot of them want to see the book before they order it online.
I don't understand that, then, either. With very few exceptions (some coffee table or photography books, for example) there's little you can glean about a book by looking through it that you can't determine from the more vast information available online about it. While I do love holding the books in my hands and looking through them, that's more after the fact. The purchasing decision is made based on information about the author, how the book was written, reviews of the book, the subject matter, etc. So I don't understand going to see a book if you already know about it.

I can see going to a bookstore and browsing, finding a book of interest, and then having the impulse to buy it online for less. But, I think that is unethical and immoral, and, in the case of the described bookstore, irrelevant, as their idea is that you then place an order online from the store. So you have the experience of waiting for the book to arrive after you've determined you want it, yet not paying less?
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Old 06-08-2019, 07:35 PM
 
11,232 posts, read 10,308,830 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
Well, this will be the beginning of the ending chapter of B&N.

In addition, this puzzles me: "The company has said its prototype stores encourage shoppers to buy books online or from a tablet." Say what? If I've gone to the bookstore, I want the book in my hands. I decided to buy it, most likely, because it was there and I picked it up and looked through it and want to bring it home with me then and there. If I *still* have to order it online, or even through a tablet and wait to have it delivered to me, why wouldn't I just buy it from my couch on amazon? Why would I get a book at a bookstore if the book isn't there?
Not to mention the waste of packing materials.
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Old 06-10-2019, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
10,874 posts, read 6,938,353 times
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I go to b & n now and then. Mostly to check out books in person. On rare occasions I make a purchase.
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Old 06-10-2019, 11:54 PM
 
660 posts, read 456,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TreeBeard View Post
It will be a sad day if the Barnes and Nobles goes out of business in our town. It is a great place to buy and peruse books, to congregate, drink coffee and meet friends.

Try that with Amazon.
Not necessarily. This could be an opportunity for the rebirth of small, independently owned bookshops across the country. I remember more than 25 or 30 years ago when Barnes & Noble opened in my area and killed about 95% of the small mom-and-pop bookstores. We resented it. The old neighborhood bookstores were better than B&N, which is really the McDonald's of bookstores.

There are still a handful of these small bookstores near me, which operate their own coffeehouses. They're a reader's paradise. I support them because they are constantly bringing in fascinating writers from across the country to lecture about their books, autograph their books, and rub shoulders with readers during cocktail parties. B&N doesn't hold a candle to them: Yeah, I'll have fries with that paperback.
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Old 06-11-2019, 06:12 AM
 
Location: So Ca
18,748 posts, read 17,138,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDM66 View Post
There are still a handful of these small bookstores near me, which operate their own coffeehouses. They're a reader's paradise. I support them because they are constantly bringing in fascinating writers from across the country to lecture about their books, autograph their books, and rub shoulders with readers during cocktail parties. B&N doesn't hold a candle to them
Unfortunately, not in greater L.A. They cannot survive here - and we all wish they could. I seem to read articles like this one frequently, and it's very sad.

L.A. Is Losing Another Iconic Bookstore:
https://www.lamag.com/citythinkblog/...unset-closing/
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Old 06-11-2019, 06:26 AM
 
9,817 posts, read 2,681,745 times
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Where we are retiring, there is a small independent bookstore that consists of about 25% new books and 75% used books, many of which are more than 25 years old. This is just one of the many reasons I can't wait to move!
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Old 06-11-2019, 06:40 AM
 
Location: PVB
3,909 posts, read 2,130,504 times
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Barnes and Noble is a flawed (since Amazon) concept. As the previous posters have said its a great place to look at books, magazines, meet friends have coffee and spend almost nothing. Its not enough to keep the doors open. Maybe the hedge fund sees value in the online business, the bricks and mortar part is in decline

wikipedia:

Barnes & Noble began reducing its overall presence in the 2010's, closing its original flagship store in early 2014. In mid-2014, the company announced it would separate its Nook Media division from its retail store division.

In February 2018, Barnes & Noble permanently laid off 1,800 full time employees at an annual cost savings of $40 million per year. According to TechCrunch, the company essentially fired their entire full time staff at all their stores, who would be making an average of $22,000 per year (~$11 per hour), and were replaced by part time workers earning close to minimum wage.

In the 2018 fiscal year that ended in July, the company overall losses reached $17 million. In early July 2018, Barnes & Noble fired Demos Parneros, for unspecified violation of company policy, which was later revealed to be over sexual abuse claims.

On October 3, 2018, the board of directors announced that they would entertain offers to buy the company. Among the potential buyers was Leonard Riggio, who owns approximately 19% of Barnes & Noble stock. As a result of the news, the company’s stock price jumped by nearly 30%. Just about eight months after Barnes & Noble revealed it was exploring a possible sale, Barnes & Noble announced June 7, 2019 that Elliott Management Corporation has agreed to acquire them for around $683 million.
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Old 06-11-2019, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
10,874 posts, read 6,938,353 times
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I'd consider buying online exclusively from B & N if they packaged books properly. amazon has slipped drastically in that department - putting new books loose in envelopes and when you get them the corners are damaged from movement during shipping - unsatisfactory. I returned a paperback twice and gave up to get a refund. The second replacement was water damaged! The pages at the end were obviously wet at one time and now dried - very noticeable - and this happened before they packed it up as the envelope was fine. w t h?

amazon will not correct this even if you ask them not to package it right.
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Old 06-11-2019, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
15,292 posts, read 5,489,528 times
Reputation: 10000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
After losing more than $1 billion in market value in five years, hedge fund Elliott Management announced it is buying the company for $683 million including debt. The only thing that surprises me is the fact that they are still in business at all.

https://www.nbcnews.com/business/bus...z10pawdt-1K1vs
James Daunt has done remarkedly well at Waterstones in the UK and Europe, which includes the Foyles and Hatchards book shops as well as Waterstones own shops, and which operates in the Britain & Ireland, the Netherlands and Belgium, and which will now join up with Barnes and Noble to form an even stronger force in the book market.

Waterstones: Buy books, stationery and gifts, online and in store

Books, Fiction, Childrens & lots more | Foyles Bookstore

Hatchards Booksellers since 1797

Barnes & Noble

So this is good news for Barnes and Noble, as the bookshop is still an interesting place to visit and many now serve refreshments/coffee and even host performances. The latest book shops are very much an experience in themselves and you can also order on-line and reserve copies for collewction via the internet, so they are well placed. The future may involve less physical bookshops but the ones that remain will be places that thodse who love books will want to visit.

As for James Daunt, he is also well known for his Daunt's Travel Book shop chain in London.

Daunt Books for Travellers | Independent Booksellers London

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Guardian

The UK arm of the $35bn Elliott Management hedge fund plans to install James Daunt, the Waterstones boss, in New York as chief executive of both chains, with the two brands retained and operated separately.

Barnes & Noble’s founder and chairman, Leonard Riggio, said Waterstones and Elliott were “uniquely suited to improve and grow our company for many years ahead” and promised to work with Daunt for a smooth transition.

In a statement confirming the Barnes & Noble deal, Daunt said traditional bookshops faced “fearsome challenges from online and digital, a complex array of difficulties that for ease and some evident reason we lay at the door of Amazon”.

He said his job was “to create, by investment and old-fashioned bookselling skill, bookshops good enough to be a pleasure in their own right and to have no equal as a place in which to choose a book. We counter thereby Amazon’s siren call and defend the continued existence of real bookshops.”

Elliott’s head of European private equity, Paul Best, said the investment in Barnes & Noble demonstrated “our conviction that readers continue to value the experience of a great bookstore”.


Waterstones owner buys US chain Barnes & Noble - The Guardian


Last edited by Brave New World; 06-11-2019 at 08:03 AM..
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