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Old 05-25-2010, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
87,782 posts, read 83,497,963 times
Reputation: 113792

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Quote:
Originally Posted by plumboz View Post
Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott. For a writer it's invaluable, but I also think that it has great ideas and reminders for anyone.

And pretty much anything by Bill Bryson. I reread The Mother Tongue at least once a year and A Walk in the Woods is hilarious.
I second that. Yes, a non-writer would enjoy it and be able to apply it to whatever s/he does.
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Old 05-28-2010, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
37,704 posts, read 40,698,162 times
Reputation: 61834
Here are some more:

Intellectuals and Society by Thomas Sowell

"Those whose careers are built on the creation and dissemination of ideas — the intellectuals — have played a role in many societies out of all proportion to their numbers. Whether that role has, on balance, made those around them better off or worse off is one of the key questions of our times."

Intellectuals and Society - Thomas Sowell - National Review Online


The Numerati by Stephen Baker

About the people who collect data on us every day without us even knowing it so they can manipulate our behavior (what we buy, how we vote, who we love). It is NOT written in research-speak.


Miles From Nowhere by Dayton Duncan

About people who live way off the beaten path.


The Man Who Loved Books Too Much by Allison Hoover Barlett

About a book thief and the rare book dealer who pursues him. This is not a thief who puts books down his pants but one with an organized system of theft trickery and one who steals for the love of books, not to resell stolen property for a profit. Gives good insight into the world of rare book collecting.
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Old 05-28-2010, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Coastal North Carolina
220 posts, read 280,009 times
Reputation: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama View Post
Oh I have this on the wait list at the library--a friend suggested it and I had never heard of it.

I just finished the Andre Agassi autobio OPEN. It is different because it is so not what I expected--a parade of feats getting to the top and lots of self-important revelations. Rather it is his perspective from a pedestrian rough around the edges kid who was forced into greatness. And one does wonder at the end if he thinks it was all worth it.
I recently read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. I really enjoyed it, and I hope you do too!
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Old 05-30-2010, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Utah
1,458 posts, read 4,111,772 times
Reputation: 1548
I've really got to keep a note pad handy...there's so many titles here that have sparked my curiosity!
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Old 06-03-2010, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas,Nevada
92 posts, read 118,440 times
Reputation: 77
Glenn beck's arguing with idiots-very good book.
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Old 06-08-2010, 02:12 AM
 
14,772 posts, read 17,009,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sky1949 View Post
Helter Skelter.

Written by Vincent Bugliosi, who prosecuted the Manson clan. A friend told me that I would be hooked after the first paragraph. He was right. You won't be able to put it down.
I tried to read that when I was around 15 - too young (the cover scared me!) will try again though ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by plumboz View Post
Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott. For a writer it's invaluable, but I also think that it has great ideas and reminders for anyone.

And pretty much anything by Bill Bryson. I reread The Mother Tongue at least once a year and A Walk in the Woods is hilarious.
I love Bill Bryson - DownUnder (I think it was published "A sunburned country in the US) is scarily accurate & hilarious.

I also highly recommend; A short History of Nearly Everything.

Malcom Gladwell's books are interesting - Outliers, tipping point

Patti Smith's story "Just Kids"
about her relationship with Robert Mapplethorpe

At the moment I am reading "Long Walk to Freedom" by Nelson Mandela ... so far it is intriguing
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Old 06-10-2010, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
87,782 posts, read 83,497,963 times
Reputation: 113792
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozgal View Post
I tried to read that when I was around 15 - too young (the cover scared me!) will try again though ...



I love Bill Bryson - DownUnder (I think it was published "A sunburned country in the US) is scarily accurate & hilarious.

I also highly recommend; A short History of Nearly Everything.

Malcom Gladwell's books are interesting - Outliers, tipping point

Patti Smith's story "Just Kids"
about her relationship with Robert Mapplethorpe

At the moment I am reading "Long Walk to Freedom" by Nelson Mandela ... so far it is intriguing
I was around 15 when I first read Helter Skelter! I did scare me...but I enjoyed it for that reason.

Read Blink and Tipping Point--haven't read Outliers yet.
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Old 06-21-2010, 11:48 PM
 
5,250 posts, read 4,629,799 times
Reputation: 17351
I've read some great bios of authors and of those not so well known folks who nonetheless are very interesting and have led very different lives. I won't spoil it for you by listing my fav's but look around the used bookstores to find those unusual bios.
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Old 07-14-2010, 03:30 AM
 
1,700 posts, read 5,901,258 times
Reputation: 1584
I love non-fiction. It's usually what I read. Some of my favorites (sorry if these have all been mentioned):

A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Death and Life of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs
Sidewalk by Mitchell Duneier
A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn
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Old 07-17-2010, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Spokane via Sydney,Australia
6,612 posts, read 12,788,128 times
Reputation: 3132
The Last NON fiction I read was What's the matter with Kansas by Thomas Frank......

A thought provoking read as to why so many vote against their own self interest, and definitely still relevant to today's political climate.
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