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Old 04-28-2013, 08:36 AM
 
17 posts, read 47,989 times
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1400 is not enough for a 1 bedroom in boston? Can someone please give me more details about that? This is shocking to me.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Lynn, MA
325 posts, read 483,384 times
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Suburbs = family oriented.
Urban = singles oriented.

NOt always true but a good rule of thumb.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Lynn, MA
325 posts, read 483,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammer33 View Post
1400 is not enough for a 1 bedroom in boston? Can someone please give me more details about that? This is shocking to me.
If you're willing to live in a student ghetto that will buy you a rather comfortable apartment... at least it did in 2009 or so when I was last looking.
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Old 04-29-2013, 12:02 PM
 
17 posts, read 47,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weird Tolkienish Figure View Post
If you're willing to live in a student ghetto that will buy you a rather comfortable apartment... at least it did in 2009 or so when I was last looking.
what do people pay for 1 bedroom rent in Boston? I mean nothing too luxury, just nice average place.
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Lynn, MA
325 posts, read 483,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammer33 View Post
what do people pay for 1 bedroom rent in Boston? I mean nothing too luxury, just nice average place.
I remember finding a decent enough looking 1BR apartment for $1200 - $1500 in that range.
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Old 04-29-2013, 02:17 PM
 
17 posts, read 47,989 times
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not sure how do people afford this, so expensive. But seems like a fun and good city.
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Old 04-29-2013, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Ohio
2,310 posts, read 6,778,991 times
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I'd say 1200 gets you something barebones to live in and probably small, dingy/old, possibly a basement or attic apt. For something more comfortable, you'd need to budget a little more or get into sharing with roommates.
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Old 04-29-2013, 03:28 PM
 
6,423 posts, read 7,701,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sammer33 View Post
not sure how do people afford this, so expensive. But seems like a fun and good city.
The place is overrun by people who are educated, experienced, intelligent, and no nonsense. We do good work and accordingly, make a good living. And if you think rent is expensive, have a look at what a home or condo costs in some areas. Oh, and don’t even get me started with daycare costs – it’s like a mortgage in itself. And there are many people here that also own summer homes.

Yes, this is an expensive place to live. There are many people from top schools and companies that stay or come here so it’s not only expensive but the lifestyle can be competitive and high stress. However, there are those of us who enjoy that type of existence and feel it makes life more fulfilling.

My wife and I both went to grad school at top institutions for our professions and we then accumulated experience. I was eventually recruited to a place here in Boston and she did not have many issues finding the right place for her (she’s friggin brilliant). So we are from wealthy but thankfully make a good enough living to afford it. But we are still surprised at the earning power of many others in our neighborhood. The other thing we see is many people who aren’t high earners but inherited a piece of real estate that is worth close to $1mm. So they live in a place and in an area that is expensive but earn a disproportionate amount compared to the people who bought here more recently. Most people I’ve met that moved here from other areas are high earners and top in their fields of practice. And remember, this is a place where many Harvard, MIT, BU, BC, Brandeis, etc. undergrad and even grad students get a job after graduation and still have to move in with roommates until they get experience and can move up and earn more pay.

Working with the right people at the top organizations in Boston is not for the faint but if one can handle it, they get a level of knowledge and experience that serves them for life.
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Old 04-29-2013, 06:43 PM
 
17 posts, read 47,989 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-fused View Post
The place is overrun by people who are educated, experienced, intelligent, and no nonsense. We do good work and accordingly, make a good living. And if you think rent is expensive, have a look at what a home or condo costs in some areas. Oh, and don’t even get me started with daycare costs – it’s like a mortgage in itself. And there are many people here that also own summer homes.

Yes, this is an expensive place to live. There are many people from top schools and companies that stay or come here so it’s not only expensive but the lifestyle can be competitive and high stress. However, there are those of us who enjoy that type of existence and feel it makes life more fulfilling.

My wife and I both went to grad school at top institutions for our professions and we then accumulated experience. I was eventually recruited to a place here in Boston and she did not have many issues finding the right place for her (she’s friggin brilliant). So we are from wealthy but thankfully make a good enough living to afford it. But we are still surprised at the earning power of many others in our neighborhood. The other thing we see is many people who aren’t high earners but inherited a piece of real estate that is worth close to $1mm. So they live in a place and in an area that is expensive but earn a disproportionate amount compared to the people who bought here more recently. Most people I’ve met that moved here from other areas are high earners and top in their fields of practice. And remember, this is a place where many Harvard, MIT, BU, BC, Brandeis, etc. undergrad and even grad students get a job after graduation and still have to move in with roommates until they get experience and can move up and earn more pay.

Working with the right people at the top organizations in Boston is not for the faint but if one can handle it, they get a level of knowledge and experience that serves them for life.
Thanks, sounds very nice and interesting.
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