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Old 09-23-2010, 12:39 PM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
17,680 posts, read 38,560,087 times
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I don't think that one can really compare NYC and Boston as cities that are equal to each other. It's like comparing Boston and Springfield, or Boston and Hartford, or Boston and Providence, or Boston and Portland, ME.

Boston is a much smaller city in footprint. We don't have all the blocks of skyscrapers. Central Park is huge. And the subways are a 24 hour system, and the night clubs are open til 3am or more.

I'd rather trek to Boston proper for the nightlife from Cambridge and Somerville than to Manhattan from Brooklyn or NJ. And who wants to live in the Bronx?
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Old 09-23-2010, 01:26 PM
 
Location: NYC/Boston/Fairfield CT
1,587 posts, read 1,646,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miu View Post
I don't think that one can really compare NYC and Boston as cities that are equal to each other. It's like comparing Boston and Springfield, or Boston and Hartford, or Boston and Providence, or Boston and Portland, ME.

Boston is a much smaller city in footprint. We don't have all the blocks of skyscrapers. Central Park is huge. And the subways are a 24 hour system, and the night clubs are open til 3am or more.

I'd rather trek to Boston proper for the nightlife from Cambridge and Somerville than to Manhattan from Brooklyn or NJ. And who wants to live in the Bronx?
There is no doubt that NYC is a much larger city in terms of population and landmass, but that should not absolve the political leaders, administrators responsibility to ensure that the city’s quality of life suffers. After all New Yorkers are burdened with higher taxes (both income and sales), get less value for the $, and NYC is an international city (“Capital of the World”). So where does the money go?

As for the subways being open 24 hours and the nightclubs closing after 3 AM – these things appeal to a certain subset of the population – younger folks who are into that sort of things. Although I am in my 20s, I have outgrown that nonsense of getting dressed up, waiting in line, and then paying tons of dollars for drinks.

Some of my good friends in NYC are into the nightlife scene but let me break down some of their limitations:

- Yes subways are running 24 hours but most of the stations (outside of 42nd st, 34st etc) aren’t exactly commuter friendly late at night. Besides the homeless (who ironically are the least of the worries), there are plenty of shady looking characters lurking in the stations. Most of my guy friends still brave it, but my female friends do not – they end up cabbing back home. True, cabs are much cheaper in NYC than Boston and they are everywhere.

- The being open after 3 AM is great…if you can get in. I have seen some really outlandish behavior by people trying to get into clubs. At these places Bouncers are like judges, who may or may not let you in. Now once you are in you definitely need to for over $15+ dollars per drink. Some of my friends are doing much better in their careers and can afford clubbing over the weekends, but right after college, the entry level jobs meant that it was either hitting the clubs or being able to pay rent on time.

I think that New York city offer incredible career opps for CERTAIN fields (Finance, Fashion, Publishing etc) but it most definitely is not the right fit for everyone. I still make weekend trips down there, catch a Broadway show and grab a nice dinner – but I wouldn’t want to live there unless the circumstances were appropriate.
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Old 09-23-2010, 05:21 PM
 
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the "24 hour subway" is a bit misleading. my 30 minute door to door commute to 14th street from brooklyn can take literally 2 hours late at night. when I lived off the F train, anytime after midnight, my commute to Dumbo was a minimum 1 hour and 15 minutes door to door, and took 3 hours on a few occasions. while I understand that the transit system here is great in terms of sheer coverage and number of passengers served, the fact of using it to commute everyday WILL expose you to this type of unpleasantness regularly. and most of this time is spent waiting in dirty stations (14th street and 6av F platform? west 4th?) ..it's not exactly a 'cost of living' issue but definitely something to consider.
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Old 09-23-2010, 07:45 PM
 
Location: NYC/Boston/Fairfield CT
1,587 posts, read 1,646,624 times
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Originally Posted by PaulDenton View Post
the "24 hour subway" is a bit misleading. my 30 minute door to door commute to 14th street from brooklyn can take literally 2 hours late at night. when I lived off the F train, anytime after midnight, my commute to Dumbo was a minimum 1 hour and 15 minutes door to door, and took 3 hours on a few occasions. while I understand that the transit system here is great in terms of sheer coverage and number of passengers served, the fact of using it to commute everyday WILL expose you to this type of unpleasantness regularly. and most of this time is spent waiting in dirty stations (14th street and 6av F platform? west 4th?) ..it's not exactly a 'cost of living' issue but definitely something to consider.
Brilliant post. Thanks for sharing. This is exactly what I was referring to! PaulDenton, you are much more patient than me - I would have marched up to the street and hailed a cab.

But your underlying point is still valid: Even though it is not a COL issue, it still relates to money. As a local, would it be fair to say that your use the subway/buses a few times a week, if not every day? Then where is your hard earned money going? I would love to see a true breakdown of what the $2.25 fare goes to? There seems to be a lot of fuzzy math going on with the MTA.

I think that a global city like New York should have an efficient subway system that is both clean and affordable. Remember that the wealthy always have that black car option or can hail a cab to get to work - the working poor, middle class folks are the ones getting squeezed by this. NYC is so expensive that the people deserve a mass transit system that doesn't gouge their wallets while providing a decent service.
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Old 09-23-2010, 11:56 PM
 
7 posts, read 23,707 times
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New Englander:

As background, let me clarify that I went to college at Tufts, then moved to New York. For the last 5 years, I've worked at a retail location on 14th street which pays me around $17/hour and provides health insurance, which I consider very good pay for the work, which is hectic but not backbreaking or monotonous. I was attending grad school for one year at NYU but the program was a bad fit. I'm now planning to move back to Boston, which explains my presence on the forums.

I ride the subway to manhattan literally every day. A cab ride is basically not an option because of the high cost - probably 30-40$ from what I hear (I've taken a cab only once since moving here). Riding a bike IS an option, but if you plan to do this, know that it will be a major lifestyle change, not simply hopping on your bike. In my last year at Tufts I began biking and the process in Boston was simply to buy a bike and a basic chain lock, and start biking around, locking up the bike outside my destination. My coworkers who bike from brooklyn to manhattan have thick industrial-looking chains to lock their bikes and eventually had to persuade management to allow them to be kept indoors because of repeated theft of parts, and sometimes entire bikes - in broad daylight on 14th street. they all have expensive, higher performance bikes because the level of skill and maneuverability needed to successfully navigate traffic and bridges is quite high. every single regular bike commuter I know at work has been injured at least once in accidents involving cars. they swap war stories in our breakroom. one coworker a few years ago was struck by a truck and killed (one of only a few people I've known in my sheltered American life who's died before old age). He was not very athletically inclined and probably just not skilled enough for the risks he was taking. It sounds pretty grim, but most of the bike commuters are perfectly happy with their lifestyle. But as an alternative to a monthly metrocard for the average worker, it's not exactly attractive. And I honestly wonder if the expenses of buying and maintaining a bike average out to significantly less than 90$/month.

I could go on - I'm personally very ready to leave NYC and readily admit the bias. But yes, that monthly metrocard cost is just a given for many, many people who live in the boroughs.
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Old 09-24-2010, 09:13 AM
 
Location: NYC/Boston/Fairfield CT
1,587 posts, read 1,646,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulDenton View Post
New Englander:

As background, let me clarify that I went to college at Tufts, then moved to New York. For the last 5 years, I've worked at a retail location on 14th street which pays me around $17/hour and provides health insurance, which I consider very good pay for the work, which is hectic but not backbreaking or monotonous. I was attending grad school for one year at NYU but the program was a bad fit. I'm now planning to move back to Boston, which explains my presence on the forums.

I ride the subway to manhattan literally every day. A cab ride is basically not an option because of the high cost - probably 30-40$ from what I hear (I've taken a cab only once since moving here). Riding a bike IS an option, but if you plan to do this, know that it will be a major lifestyle change, not simply hopping on your bike. In my last year at Tufts I began biking and the process in Boston was simply to buy a bike and a basic chain lock, and start biking around, locking up the bike outside my destination. My coworkers who bike from brooklyn to manhattan have thick industrial-looking chains to lock their bikes and eventually had to persuade management to allow them to be kept indoors because of repeated theft of parts, and sometimes entire bikes - in broad daylight on 14th street. they all have expensive, higher performance bikes because the level of skill and maneuverability needed to successfully navigate traffic and bridges is quite high. every single regular bike commuter I know at work has been injured at least once in accidents involving cars. they swap war stories in our breakroom. one coworker a few years ago was struck by a truck and killed (one of only a few people I've known in my sheltered American life who's died before old age). He was not very athletically inclined and probably just not skilled enough for the risks he was taking. It sounds pretty grim, but most of the bike commuters are perfectly happy with their lifestyle. But as an alternative to a monthly metrocard for the average worker, it's not exactly attractive. And I honestly wonder if the expenses of buying and maintaining a bike average out to significantly less than 90$/month.

I could go on - I'm personally very ready to leave NYC and readily admit the bias. But yes, that monthly metrocard cost is just a given for many, many people who live in the boroughs.
Thanks for the background. I don't think it's a question of bias but rather rooted in reality. I think any fair minded New Yorker will agree that they have been mistreated in the mass transit system and should be getting a better value for the money.

I know that for some people it is absolutely critical to be in NYC, so that they can start/build their careers. They don't have that option. I mean if I was a kid from Iowa, I would be choosing New York over Boston without a doubt. So I understand the motivation of people looking to move to NYC. However my concern is that the reality is so out of whack for New York, that the city won’t be able to retain everyone except the very rich and the very poor.
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Old 09-24-2010, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Newton, Mass.
2,954 posts, read 11,887,821 times
Reputation: 1502
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulDenton View Post
the "24 hour subway" is a bit misleading. my 30 minute door to door commute to 14th street from brooklyn can take literally 2 hours late at night. when I lived off the F train, anytime after midnight, my commute to Dumbo was a minimum 1 hour and 15 minutes door to door, and took 3 hours on a few occasions. while I understand that the transit system here is great in terms of sheer coverage and number of passengers served, the fact of using it to commute everyday WILL expose you to this type of unpleasantness regularly. and most of this time is spent waiting in dirty stations (14th street and 6av F platform? west 4th?) ..it's not exactly a 'cost of living' issue but definitely something to consider.
Amen. I lived in Park Slope and Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, at various times and at any point after 10 PM, it would routinely take 2 hours to get home on the subway. Waiting 25 mins in a dingy station for each train, counting the rodents. The express trains would go local at night and make 30 stops instead of 5, train lines not running due to maintenance, etc. My train in Bay Ridge didn't run at all past 10 PM; you had to take other trains to a shuttle version of it. Every time I went out with friends, my choice was 2 hours on the subway or $40 I really didn't have for a taxi.

There was also some psychological frustration because there are so many train lines interconnecting. You'd have to make a choice about which train to take, and half the time I'd see the one I'd decided not to take sitting in the station ahead, blocking the one I did take. The local I needed to transfer to would be right across the platform from it, but by the time my train entered the station it was gone and I was stuck there for half an hour, waiting for the next one and cursing myself for guessing poorly which train would be better on that particular night. Because there's just no way to predict.
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Old 09-27-2010, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Newton, Mass.
2,954 posts, read 11,887,821 times
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Originally Posted by New Englander View Post
Sorry but removing the clothing tax exemption means very little when the MTA is making noise about increasing subway/bus fares. I mean that is absolutely ridiculous considering how much New Yorkers rely on public transit.
NE--they're eliminating the exemption-this means you'll have to pay tax on the full value of clothing articles. It's more tax, not less. And the MTA is increasing fares.

I am in NYC today. I had to take the subway three local stops but, since it rained, that took over an hour. It's like this every time it rained. Yesterday I had 5 hours worth of traffic doing a round trip from Brooklyn to JFK.
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Old 10-15-2011, 04:25 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
24 posts, read 62,792 times
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The subways in NYC are so dirty, have you ever smelled the canal street station. It literally is unbearable and it has been like that forever.

Sometimes when I used to live in Brooklyn it would take 4-5 hours to get home because I would get stuck because certain trains wouldnt be running and there was no way for me to know this until I actually got to which ever particular station along my path home. So then Im stuck trying to figure out how in god's name to get home.

I will be moving to Boston soon and am incredibly grateful for this opportunity because New York is trouble in more ways than one!
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Old 03-28-2013, 03:30 PM
 
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As someone who's lived both in NYC and Boston, I'll say that Boston is more expensive, for numerous reasons. You can rent a nice 2 bedroom apartment in a good neighborhood in Brooklyn for 1,250 - $1,500. If you rent the same size apartment in Boston, in a good neighborhood or close to Boston (Medford, Somerville, Cambridge) - you're looking at 1,500+. There are tons of schools in Boston, therefore the demand for apartments is always high, especially anywhere near the train line. Parking is an absolute nightmare in Greater Boston area! A New Yorker will never understand how can one live in Brookline, where on-street parking is NOT permitted overnight. There's residential parking only in most Boston neighborhoods, living in the North End is crazy, you pay close to $2,000 for a closet size apartment w/on street parking which is free, and for residents only, but you have to circle around for hours to find a spot. Also, there is NO comparison between NYC's trains and Boston's T system. NYC is better, faster, runs 24/7. Yes, we all know there's ALWAYS some sort of train work happening and service gets redirected, however - nothing in the world can compare to Boston's p.m. rush hour on the Orange line!!! Nothing. It's terrible. You may get pregnant if you're not careful enough, people are literally on top of you and more often then not, one has to let 2-3 trains go by before physically being able to get into one. Boston is cleaner than NY. New Yorkers can get away w/out having a car, one can get pretty much anywhere via public transportation, such is not the case in Boston, especially if you don't live in the city. Also, the cost of a lot of services is higher in Boston and I don't know why. For example, manicures/pedicures in Brooklyn ($13-$20 for both), in Boston $33+ for both. Haircuts are triple the cost in Boston.
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