U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 01-27-2010, 05:19 AM
 
1 posts, read 2,331 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

I may have to move to the Cambridge area (near MIT). Is this area easily accessiable by public transportation? What areas outside of Cambridge are affordable and easily accessable to Cambridge? I have heard that the traffic into Cambridge/Boston is a nightmare so I am looking at options via public transportation.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-27-2010, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Dallas
4,621 posts, read 9,881,101 times
Reputation: 3888
The MIT campus is like a mile across. On one side there is Red Line service from Kendall Sq. Equidistant is the Central Sq Red Line stop. The number one bus goes right to the front door. And MIT may have shuttle service (Harvard does).
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-27-2010, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA
4,862 posts, read 12,911,337 times
Reputation: 6842
You can look at the entire MBTA (Mass. Bay Transit Authority) system map on their Web site: MBTA.com > Official Website for Greater Boston's Public Transportation System
The "T" is sometimes no picnic either - overcrowding, almost inevitably a subway slowdown during peak hours - but I've gone car-less without problems for twelve years.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-27-2010, 09:41 PM
 
5,817 posts, read 15,148,535 times
Reputation: 4708
If you're working near MIT, the best areas for public transit would be along the red line. You might check out Somerville (Davis Sq. stop on the map Goyguy linked to) for another lively urban area outside of Cambridge itself. Depending on how long a commute you can handle, since it's at the opposite end of the red line, you might check out Quincy. Quincy has a mix of urban and suburban character. Might not be as hip as Cambridge or Somerville, but still will have some basic cityish shopping and dining, and may offer some less expensive housing options than the other two cities.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-28-2010, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Quincy, MA
385 posts, read 1,393,500 times
Reputation: 189
Quincy will definitely be cheaper than Cambridge or Somerville. Whether you'd like it probably depends on if you're OK with needing to hop on the subway to get to "hip" areas, or if you want them within walking distance. Would probably take 25-30 minutes to get from Quincy to Kendall, depending on where in Quincy you were.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2010, 01:47 AM
 
Location: Quincy, Mass. (near Boston)
2,647 posts, read 4,580,509 times
Reputation: 2136
If you choose Quincy, lz1982 said it may be necessary at times to take the red line back to parts of Cambridge & Somerviile, just for a change of pace. I agree.

Living in Quincy since 2004, I actually find myself hopping on the T occasionally just to get some decent pizza, bakery products, ice cream, etc. in Cambridge or Somerville (or Boston) on the red line. I have some favorite foodie needs there which Quincy cannot be expected to match in many cases -- and I'll combine it just to people watch and listen on a random summer night...if only for a different type of culinary or cultural injection.

But do check Quincy, even Braintree, a town with a large mall at the extreme end of the red line. I'm unsure if that station is near many rentals, or only homes. But don't overlook tony Beacon Hill; it does offer some scrappy studios on the north slope, not as chic as the better parts of the hill. You may snare an efficiency studio for as low as $975-$1100/mo., but it won't be romantic. But you could walk to parts of MIT in as little as 20 minutes, and it's a stroll to the Esplanade along the river.

South Boston is popular with 20-somethings, also on the red line.

Of course, parts of Dorchester are on another branch of the red line. If interested, other posts describe these parts, some with nice homes, but some areas more dangerous than most of Quincy, Cam/Som. or S. Boston.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2010, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Quincy, MA
385 posts, read 1,393,500 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Living in Quincy since 2004, I actually find myself hopping on the T occasionally just to get some decent pizza, bakery products, ice cream, etc. in Cambridge or Somerville (or Boston) on the red line.
I have to recommend Schoolhouse Pizza in Quincy Center. I tried them recently and they use fresh, natural ingredients for a non-greasy pie. It's not Greek-style, either, which is rare around these parts.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2010, 09:16 AM
 
7,228 posts, read 6,561,537 times
Reputation: 12265
First, you need to define what is affordable *for you*.

Other areas to check out where you could have bus access to the MIT area: Inman Square (Cambridge), East Cambridge (around Lechmere), and both Union Square (Somerville) and East Somerville, around Sullivan Square.

You may find cheaper options if you are willing to take a bus to the subway, like in Spring Hill (Somerville).
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2010, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Quincy, Mass. (near Boston)
2,647 posts, read 4,580,509 times
Reputation: 2136
Cantabridgiene mentioned overlooked East Cambridge and even Inman Square. This way, you could live and work in Cambridge, if you don't mind buses, or a longer walk to a subway stop for other desinations. E. Cambridge has a small branch library, as well as the new police headquarters. Not as stylish as other parts of Cambridge, but neither as scrappy as other parts (which have housing projects sprinkled in there).

Hey, it's a more diverse city than people may expect,

.......
Liz: Yes, I do like Schoolhouse Pizza in Quincy, esp. with its wooden floors and schoolhouse-like blackboards with the menu written in chalk. Can't remember if I liked the pizza enough (last yr.), but liked their mac and cheese (homemade but microwaved). I'll have to try their pizza again, due to your mention of their quality ingredients!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2010, 01:01 PM
 
26 posts, read 63,322 times
Reputation: 14
What about Allston/Brighton? Just a short walk over the river.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top