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Old 02-27-2010, 12:14 AM
 
88 posts, read 270,157 times
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Hi

My Husband has recently immigrated from Ireland and we are thinking moving to the Boston area. We are wondering how Irish are treated in Boston. Is it a situation where there are so many Irish people in Boston it’s ignored or not noticed? Or would there be a lot of stereotyping (e.g. if you have an Irish accent you must like drinking and fighting)? Would people go out of their way to talk to him about it a lot? Is Boston inauthenticly Irish? Like the green beer, green neon lights etc… ? We find that kind of distasteful and embarrassing.

We just want to be in a place that will have a bit of home/europeaness, but with American infrastructure and someplace where we can get a good Full Irish Breakfast when we want it, or watch the football in a pub or hang out with other ex-pats, but nothing overkill or fake.

Thanks,
Danni.C
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Old 02-27-2010, 01:05 AM
 
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Boston has the reputation of having a well educated and cultured demographic profile. I wouldn't worry much about kitsch Irish culture there. Around St. Patrick's day one could see shamrocks just about everywhere, of course, as merchants use every opportunity for sale promotions, just like elsewhere.
Same applies to possible Boston stereotypes about Irish and alcoholism or fighting.
Indeed Boston is a city with many Irish Americans. However, Boston is an American city thus cannot be authentically Irish. Keep an open mind, and as you don't like Irish cliches resist the temptation to apply cliches to your new country. And welcome to America!

Last edited by learningCA; 02-27-2010 at 01:42 AM..
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Old 02-27-2010, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Central Maine
4,697 posts, read 6,451,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by learningCA View Post
Indeed Boston is a city with many Irish Americans. However, Boston is an American city thus cannot be authentically Irish.
I agree completely. As a third-generation Irish-American growing up in West Roxbury in the '50s and early '60s, I did not think of myself as Irish, but rather, as American. It was only years later, looking back at the street we lived on, that I realized that so many of the families there were of Irish descent.

Here's a resource that may be of help: The Irish Immigration Center
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Old 02-27-2010, 12:26 PM
 
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My boyfriend is Irish; he's been over for about 16 years now. When he first lived here, he was in Dorchester, then South Boston, then Brighton, then Somerville and now, Cambridge. I'd say the first three are probably the most heavily-populated by Irish ex-pats, but in general, as Ireland's economy grew, there aren't nearly as many Irish coming over the way there used to be.

He is still often asked about his accent, or what part of Ireland he's from, and sometimes people can't grasp the part that he's lived here for many years and knows the city well, but I don't think that being Irish is negative for him.

As for Irish atmosphere, there are plenty of McPubs in Boston that are "Irish" in name only, but there are plenty of places where you'll certainly hear brogues, and not just from the staff. And an proper fryer-up is not hard to find.
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Old 02-27-2010, 01:16 PM
 
694 posts, read 1,233,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabridgienne View Post
My boyfriend is Irish; he's been over for about 16 years now. When he first lived here, he was in Dorchester, then South Boston, then Brighton, then Somerville and now, Cambridge. I'd say the first three are probably the most heavily-populated by Irish ex-pats, but in general, as Ireland's economy grew, there aren't nearly as many Irish coming over the way there used to be.
That no longer applies:
http://www.boston.com/news/world/eur...sh_immigrants/
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