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Old 10-08-2011, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Virginia
65 posts, read 121,976 times
Reputation: 87

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Quote:
Originally Posted by konafamily View Post
From what we have read, Boston Latin School is one of the best hight schools in the area, and we are fine with living in Boston, but don't want her to have bad schools until she (might) get in to there.

Other areas we are thinking are Arlington, Belmont, Lexington, etc.

We want to be close to Boston and are not looking for the rural experience.

Any help or gudiance would be great. Are there good middle schools in Boston for the two years before BLS? Are the other HS's in the area just as good as BLS and so we should look elsewhere?
As a teenager I was actually assigned to Girls Latin School, ninth grade, by the School Board and had no idea how competitive it was even back then. I can tell you the academic standards are extremely high. As an example, my first English assignment due the very next day was to memorize "The Chambered Nautilus" a very long poem. When the next day came we were to write it out and not leave out any of the punctuation. It was a very hard school for me because I did not have the advantage of having done 7th and 8th grade there. That was just one of the assignments for that first day at Girls Latin. Now of course it is co-ed and is known as Boston Latin. Next post, I will tell you a bit about Belmont High School. --yokie
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Old 10-08-2011, 04:32 PM
 
Location: West Roxbury, MA
289 posts, read 568,347 times
Reputation: 437
You don't have to attend a year of Boston Public School to attend BLS.

But BLS is *not* a school to uproot your life for. My super-smart free-thinking son barely made it through two years because the regimentation wasn't for him. My daughter, in her early years, would have lived there. At the end she couldn't wait to get out. She did go to an ivy league school, but she didn't need BLS for that. There are *way* too many teachers who shouldn't be within a hundred yards of an adolescent; teachers who are mean-spirited, demean their students, and just don't teach well. If all the stars are aligned, you can get a great education and get through with your self-esteem intact. In my eight years as a parent, a VERY involved parent, I didn't see that very often.
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Old 04-01-2012, 12:06 AM
 
7 posts, read 13,358 times
Reputation: 10
My kids attend BLS. Let's not split hairs, it is a very good school, very rigorous academically. It is hard to get into, with some students needing tutoring to get a good enough test grade. I wish BLS could be more nurturing. My kids got lucky with some wonderful, supportive teachers, but some of the rules and requirements don't advocate the students as much as I had hoped. My kids have had enough and are anxious to leave. Know what your child needs for a school. Good luck.
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Old 04-01-2012, 09:04 AM
 
72 posts, read 151,589 times
Reputation: 23
I went to BLS. I wouldn't remove to the city on the off my kid got accepted though...and I am actually relocating to Boston in a year or so. My kids are young and I don't want to pay for private school or put my kids in BPS for elementary school. I grew up in West Roxbury though and attended a private Catholic School in Chestnut Hill, the went on to BLS. I'll say I got a great education there, like 5 years of Latin, 4 of Spanish, advanced math classes, history, etc...that said I'd be nervous about me kid taking the bus everyday to BLS. I loved it but now that I'm a mother I'd be nervous about my daughter doing it everyday. I'm sure I'm overreacting but that's just what I feel. If I lived in Boston and she got accepted I would probably send her there though. It really was great and so diverse. It was good to mix with so many other kids that came from different backgrounds.
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Old 04-01-2012, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
3,973 posts, read 5,779,882 times
Reputation: 4738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yokie View Post
Now of course it is co-ed and is known as Boston Latin. --yokie
Boston Latin Academy you mean. The sexist world of 1877 didn't think it was appropriate to admit girls to Boston Latin, which until 1972 was all boys, and so the school board created another Boston Latin-like school for girls only and called it "Girls Latin School" and this school had to be renamed something after it went coed (also in '72) and so it was renamed Boston Latin Academy to differentiate it from the formerly all boys Boston Latin "School". Just a little historical correction .
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Old 04-09-2012, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Mass
974 posts, read 1,901,728 times
Reputation: 1024
Quote:
Originally Posted by snatale1 View Post
Latin is a good school. but not worth moving into Boston for. Roxbury Latin would be better then Boston, at least it's not in the ghetto.
The Fenway is now considered ghetto? You better tell Harvard Medical School to lock up their stethoscopes. . .
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Old 04-11-2012, 01:07 PM
 
7,930 posts, read 7,829,747 times
Reputation: 4157
In all due respect are you looking for teachers or a institution? If you want to instruct students in something they don't specifically "need" the school. These days there is plenty of information on the internet. MIT has courseware classes, Khan academy has k-12 material etc. It is harder to argue about prestige these days. Yes there are some that consider it but then again there are others that do not. Supposedly Goldman Sachs hires from one ivy league school and it is not Harvard or Yale.

Private schools (k-12) pay teachers much less than public schools. Granted you can kick out trouble makers but these days with public you can have them transferred out. In addition there are no correlations with higher spending per student and higher grades because Lawrence actually spends the most in the state and nearly half of them don't graduate high school!
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Old 04-11-2012, 05:20 PM
 
92 posts, read 180,686 times
Reputation: 90
Don't forget the abundance of exceptional Catholic schools in Massachusetts. And it doesn't matter what, if any, religion you identify with.
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Old 10-05-2012, 07:54 AM
 
6 posts, read 13,210 times
Reputation: 13
Default BLS is something special in my opinion

Hi, I attended BLS 20 plus years ago but I'd just like to note that schools like it (BLA, Stuyvesant in NY, etc) may have an "edge" in getting into elite schools because from what I understand, college admissions officers get thousands of applications from valedictorians from every well off suburban high school in America, as well as schools like Andover and Exeter and now top students from overseas--whereas the urban exam schools bring diversity into the college class. This is not related to race per se but just having a different experience to an upper middle class graduate of a suburban high school.

I have family where the parents generation (aged 50s and 60s) got into Ivy Leagues but their children can't, because there seems to be so much more competition now and they aren't sufficiently differentiated to get in. I'm not saying it's guaranteed that you'll get into Harvard from BLS if you're ranked in the top 20 of your class, but from the suburbs, it seems like you have to win a national science fair, patent a new invention, be a virtuoso in music, be a national champion in sports, to get into an Ivy these days.

Again not that Ivies are the end game (there are plenty of very successful people in my industry who attended no college, a lesser ranked college, etc) but if you are looking to differentiate your child in the suburbs I think you need to have them taking college level science classes at the age of 15! Plus I found drug use to be higher among the wealthier suburban kids I knew and also a lot of eating disorders. All my friends were too busy working 1-2 jobs plus BLS plus sports to get into drugs.

It's true that the facilities we had at BLS were weak compared to the rich suburbs against whom we competed in sports, and there was significant snobbery exhibited by these suburban kids towards us (quotes like "that's all right, that's ok you will be working for me some day", yeah not exactly!!). But this just motivated me to do better and outperform them in sports and in academics. The BLS facilities now are much better.
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
3,973 posts, read 5,779,882 times
Reputation: 4738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bos2000 View Post
Hi, I attended BLS 20 plus years ago but I'd just like to note that schools like it (BLA, Stuyvesant in NY, etc) may have an "edge" in getting into elite schools because from what I understand, college admissions officers get thousands of applications from valedictorians from every well off suburban high school in America, as well as schools like Andover and Exeter and now top students from overseas--whereas the urban exam schools bring diversity into the college class. This is not related to race per se but just having a different experience to an upper middle class graduate of a suburban high school.

I have family where the parents generation (aged 50s and 60s) got into Ivy Leagues but their children can't, because there seems to be so much more competition now and they aren't sufficiently differentiated to get in. I'm not saying it's guaranteed that you'll get into Harvard from BLS if you're ranked in the top 20 of your class, but from the suburbs, it seems like you have to win a national science fair, patent a new invention, be a virtuoso in music, be a national champion in sports, to get into an Ivy these days.

Again not that Ivies are the end game (there are plenty of very successful people in my industry who attended no college, a lesser ranked college, etc) but if you are looking to differentiate your child in the suburbs I think you need to have them taking college level science classes at the age of 15! Plus I found drug use to be higher among the wealthier suburban kids I knew and also a lot of eating disorders. All my friends were too busy working 1-2 jobs plus BLS plus sports to get into drugs.

It's true that the facilities we had at BLS were weak compared to the rich suburbs against whom we competed in sports, and there was significant snobbery exhibited by these suburban kids towards us (quotes like "that's all right, that's ok you will be working for me some day", yeah not exactly!!). But this just motivated me to do better and outperform them in sports and in academics. The BLS facilities now are much better.
True. There were a few drinking incidents when I was at BLS and I did know a few students that smoked pot but there was never a drug craze like those in the really wealthy suburban schools. As my City-Data namesake suggests, a whole lot of us could barely afford any luxuries back in high school much less drugs. And yes, some private academies and suburban schools bested us by the amount of resources they had. Our speech and debate team used to call ourselves "the ghetto team" in the face of those other schools. It just goes to show how hard we all had to work to catch up to the rich kids.
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