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Old 08-02-2007, 11:22 PM
 
1 posts, read 5,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mandapanda View Post
Colsteve, we hardly rushed into a purchase. We lived in a house built by these people. He was pres of the homeowners' assn, I called the state to make sure they were registered. They lived around the corner. Problem is there is no consumer protection and the wrong people know that. Friends elsewhere assume these people have left the state. Far from it. They are building all over the place. They have lived all over the state and in other states, but they are planted here. And they are Montanans, not outsiders.
Thanks for the info. We are considering moving to Bozeman as my husbands parents live there. We have seen the explosion in the real estate market and it's unbelievable how much it has changed in such a short amount of time. Is there any advice from mandapanda re: which subdivisions have shady developers/poor quality? I'd really like to have my eyes wide open before making such a big move.
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Old 08-03-2007, 02:22 AM
 
Location: California
510 posts, read 3,069,924 times
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My experience with the weather in Billings, Bozeman, and Missoula is that it can change in a heartbeat. I've been golfing in each of those cities on a bright warm sunny day. Within an hour it's dumping rain, 30 minutes later it's snowing, then another hour it's hot and sunny.

Being so close to the mountains will shield you from a lot of the weather coming from the coast...it will dump more on the west side of the divide.

I personally have never been anywhere that has a better summer than those three cities. The winter is the trade off, and yes it will get cold. Average probably 20-30 degrees through the winter, with weeks running at zero and sub zero. It is however dry, and not nearly as cold as say NY with the same temperature.
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Old 08-24-2007, 12:05 PM
 
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Default Earthquakes?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mandapanda View Post

My usual word of caution - Montana has no consumer protection. Beware if you are going to build a home or even buy a newer home. The houses are going up fast and they aren't always the best built. This is an earthquake area.
Earthquakes, really? So what sort of home needs to be built to withstand such and do you know if the state has regulations concerning building in 'earthquake country'? Thanks
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Old 08-24-2007, 04:52 PM
 
Location: LEAVING CD
22,973 posts, read 24,134,427 times
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Welcome to C-D!
As far as I can tell there are no regulations for earthquake building here. I built with standard earthquake precautions but you have to be sure that your builder does so. In the county there is no building inspections other than what you do... Also, I don't know the last time an earthquake of any size has hit here and done damage.
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Old 09-24-2007, 02:42 AM
 
Location: Boulder, Colorado
59 posts, read 217,293 times
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Default Bozeman Weather

We lived in Bozeman for a while and found it to be a very friendly and engaging town. Two things ultimately led us to leave: its weather and isolation. Now some people embrace cold wintry days and seeing as little of friends and family in remote locales as possible. As one of our friends here once said, people move to Montana to get away from their family!

My feeling about the weather in Bozeman is that the winters are fairly severe and tend to be cloudier than advertised. For someone coming from South Dakota or Upstate Maine, it's not bad. Let's just say there are three places that have cross-country skiing inside the city limits of Bozeman. Some winters they have trouble holding snow. But the last two they have been open by late November. Expect the snow to come in late November/early December and stay for good until mid-March. It's just too cold in Bozeman, the sun is low in the sky at this northern latitude (46 degrees), and it's cloudy enough, that the snow sticks around here.

A typical day in the depth of winter would be a high of 28 and a low of 7 and mostly cloudy. There are stretches of days lasting a week or longer where you don't get above freezing day or night. You also can get some mild spells of temps in the 50s as well. You also usually have a day or two where the high does not get above zero. Spring is very short. Summers can be wonderful although the 16 days above 100 degrees last July (all-time high of 106) combined with smoke of local forest fires was an unpleasant anomaly. Fall can be a wonderful season as well, although it cools off fast as you get into October. It may may snow tonight.

Real estate agents and other local boosters may deny the truth of these statements. Bozeman is a very attractive place to live in many ways, but for us the weather was too severe. I guess it helps keep the population down in the Gallatin Valley -- which isn't a completely bad thing.
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Old 10-19-2007, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Sarasota
462 posts, read 1,585,735 times
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Ah, but what exactly is a "normal year" anymore? The last handful of years have been considered mild compared to the years of old. We almost always get a good full week of 20 degrees below 0 and then that's it for the winter. BUT, last winter we had 20 below at least on 5 separate occasions and more snow than we'd had in about 9 years. Bozeman almost always has snow in the winter as does Butte. I live in the Jefferson Valley just south of Whitehall and we get little snow by comparison....something to do with being sandwiched between two mountain ranges and we seem to be protected here. Winters are often nice and sunny with blue skies and dry climate so it doesn't feel that cold...but believe me, when it gets down to -20 and the mucous membranes in your nose freeze, it's cold!!! Freezing pipes, high heating costs...that's winter in MT. AND winter comes early and stays late...starts in October and doesn't leave until June! You need to know the truth and be ready to drive on snow and ice over mountain passes etc. Also Bozeman now has the claim to fame of being the highest cost of living in the state of Montana. Housing costs (median house $349,000.) and taxes are crazy high. OK, you've been warned. Now make your own educated decision and do visit during the winter as well as summer to get a real feel for the climate. Good luck!
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Old 12-05-2010, 05:03 AM
 
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what do think abut
"bozeman"
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Old 12-05-2010, 07:51 AM
 
475 posts, read 1,371,333 times
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My daughter moved from FL to Bozeman last January. She drives a Subaru, equipped with Blizzak snows and a block heater, she also carries a cold weather emergency/survival kit as she must drive out of town on a regular basis for work. Her apt. also has a garage. All of those things are either mandatory or helpful; depending on your point of view. She never drove in snow and has done very well. She has a good attitude and an adventurous nature. She loves MT and the people. We visited in June and it was still snowing. In the past two weeks they have had very cold weather -19 with a wind chill of -41, tough weather to walk the dogs at 5:00 a.m. They have also had a couple good snow falls of 8 to 12 inches of snow during the same time frame. The mountains are beautiful, people are great, weather can be brutal. It all gets down to what you are willing to deal with.
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Old 12-07-2010, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,309 posts, read 3,616,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reedsmit View Post
My daughter moved from FL to Bozeman last January. She drives a Subaru, equipped with Blizzak snows and a block heater, she also carries a cold weather emergency/survival kit as she must drive out of town on a regular basis for work. Her apt. also has a garage. All of those things are either mandatory or helpful; depending on your point of view. She never drove in snow and has done very well. She has a good attitude and an adventurous nature. She loves MT and the people. We visited in June and it was still snowing. In the past two weeks they have had very cold weather -19 with a wind chill of -41, tough weather to walk the dogs at 5:00 a.m. They have also had a couple good snow falls of 8 to 12 inches of snow during the same time frame. The mountains are beautiful, people are great, weather can be brutal. It all gets down to what you are willing to deal with.
.............Linda............

Really glad daughter is doing so well and loves Montana and it's people & their helpful attitudes.

Being the "weather wimp" that I am.............I have to admit these temps here in the Casa Grande area (mid seventies) feel pretty good for "these old bones". It was minus 18 at my place during the week before I left. Yes I made it safe and sound........(didn't have any special tires, but....I do have an almost new set of fairly aggressive "ALL Season" General Grabber HTS tires, optional 4WD and 'a lot of weight' in the Yukon....took the route south on #93 out of Missoula, MT, down through Salmon, ID to Mud Lake, ID ............(this was the only stretch of highway that was a little "hairy"---about 100 miles of gusty winds, blowing snow and some 'ice-fog), .....picked up I-15 & went south down through Utah to Exit 95 (Hwy 20 E), over to Rt 89......on down through Kanab, UT.....on over to Page, AZ and down to Flagstaff. And then picked up I-10 in Phoenix area and on to C.G. About 1250 miles (+/-). Took me 2 1/2 days ( I stop every 3 hrs to let the dog out to run & do his duty), and I usually do 475 to 500 per day in 8 to 9 hours.

Have a Merry Christmas Season. Griz (Don)
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Old 12-12-2010, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,820 posts, read 13,427,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimj View Post
Welcome to C-D!
As far as I can tell there are no regulations for earthquake building here. I built with standard earthquake precautions but you have to be sure that your builder does so. In the county there is no building inspections other than what you do... Also, I don't know the last time an earthquake of any size has hit here and done damage.
Reason being, the major quakes have been fairly remote from the cities, cuz we don't build right up to the mountaintops (yet!) -- 1959 Yellowstone quake, and 1980ish Idaho-middle-of-nowhere quake are the only two I can recall being noteworthy, but no town damage other than the "new" part of Paris Gibson, which I gather deserved it. You can get cracked foundations or plaster from small local quakes no matter where you live, tho -- the only state that's essentially quake-free, per USGS data, is North Dakota. In Great Falls sometimes we'd get up in the morning and all the pictures would be askew and some cupboard doors would be open, and that's how we knew we'd had a small quake during the night.

Ordinary good building practices (use nails, not staples!) and tying the building to the foundation properly are enough for all practical purposes, for houses. If there's a big enough quake close enough to do real damage, anything else honestly won't make much difference in whether a single-family house needs rebuilding or repair; what will take major hits are substandard multistory and brick buildings. I speak from the experience of having the 1994 Northridge quake almost underfoot (at the time I lived about 10 miles from the epicenter) and having friends whose house was practically at ground zero. Their elderly house (which was NOT quakeproofed) survived just fine, tho it pretty much needed a complete reroofing, replastering, and replumbing.

Frost heave does a whole lot more damage than quakes, and you get frost heave reliably several times every winter in MT, not randomly decades or hundreds of years apart.
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