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Old 02-25-2008, 05:55 AM
 
Location: The world, where will fate take me this time?
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Ok, we have some buddhists here like chielgirl and kerby, and chielgirl said in a previous post that nobody talks about Buddhism, so I thought interesting to have an exchange of ideas with people who finds this philosophy interesting.

I don't know much about Buddhism to be honest but I know these few things.
  • Buddhism is a Godless philosophy similar to Nastikas which are phillosophies from India that do not believe that God is the prime mover and doer in this world and actually some people consider Buddhism part of the Nastika family
  • Buddhism is a Dharmic philosophy meaning that it shares with Hinduism, Jainism and Sikhism concepts such as karma, dharma, samsara and moksha
  • The objective of Buddhists is to attain Nirvana the perfect peace of the mind that is free from craving, anger and other afflictive states (kilesa). This peace, which is in reality the fundamental nature of the mind, is revealed when the root causes of the afflictive states are dissolved, this makes it a phillosophy very similar to yoga, just that yoga makes part of Astika phillosophies because it believes that God is the central doer in this world, but finally the objective is the same.
  • Buddhism was founded by Siddhārtha Gautama who was a spiritual teacher from ancient India.
  • He is generally recognized by Buddhists as the Supreme Buddha, because there can be more than one Buddha
The core Values of Buddhism are
  1. The Four Noble Truths: that suffering is an inherent part of existence; that the origin of suffering is ignorance and the main symptoms of that ignorance are attachment and craving; that attachment and craving can be ceased; and that following the Noble Eightfold Pathwill lead to the cessation of attachment and craving and therefore suffering.
  2. The Noble eightfold path: right understanding, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration.
It is very interesting to know, that this eightfold path is very similar to Patanjali's (the Father of Yoga) Patanjali's Eight-fold Path

That is the reason why Hinduists consider Buddha, the Ninth Avatar of Vishnu, after Krishna who was the Eight and Rama who was the Seventh.



Buddha as the ninth avatar of Vishnu.

for more info: Ten Avatars of Vishnu

Buddha from the Hindu perspective - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hope this is just an small seed of a very interesting dialogue

O Keshava! O Lord of the universe! O Lord Hari, who have assumed the form of Buddha! All glories to You! O Buddha of compassionate heart, you decry the slaughtering of poor animals performed according to the rules of Vedic sacrifice.
.
May He who is the Brahman of the Hindus, the Ahura Mazda of Zoroastrians, the Buddha of Buddhists, the Jehovah of the Jews, the Father in Heavens of Christians, give strength to you to carry out your noble ideas

Last edited by Travelling fella; 02-25-2008 at 06:11 AM..
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Old 02-25-2008, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Y-Town Area
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Default More explanation

"Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religion for the future: it transcends a personal God, avoids dogmas and theology; it covers both the natural & spiritual, and it is based on a religious sense aspiring from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity"A widely cited, but apparently spurious quotation attributed toAlbert Einstein 1"The greatest achievement is selflessness.
The greatest worth is self-mastery.
The greatest quality is seeking to serve others.
The greatest precept is continual awareness.
The greatest medicine is the emptiness of everything.
The greatest action is not conforming with the worlds ways.
The greatest magic is transmuting the passions.
The greatest generosity is non-attachment.
The greatest goodness is a peaceful mind.
The greatest patience is humility.
The greatest effort is not concerned with results.
The greatest meditation is a mind that lets go.
The greatest wisdom is seeing through appearances." Atisha."If you live the sacred and despise the ordinary, you are still bobbing in the ocean of delusion." Lin-Chi."Aware of the suffering caused by the destruction of life, I vow to cultivate compassion and learn ways to protect lives of people, animals, plants, and minerals. I am determined not to kill, not to let others kill, and not to condone any killing in the world, in my thinking, and in my way of life.” Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh."When the mind begins to become still, we then begin to truly see it. When you first try to stabilize and pacify the mind, initially it will become very busy because it’s not accustomed to being still. In fact, it doesn’t even necessarily want to become still, but it is essential to get a hold of the mind to recognize its nature. This practice is extremely important. ... Eventually you will find yourself in a state where your mind is clear and open all the time. It is just like when the clouds are removed from the sky and the sun can clearly be seen, shining all the time. This is coming close to the state of liberation, liberation from all traces of suffering. ... The truth of this practice is universal. It isn’t necessary to call it a religion to practice it. Whether one is a Hindu or a Moslem or a Christian or a Buddhist simply doesn’t matter. Anyone can practice this because this is the nature of the mind, the nature of everyone’s mind. If you can get a handle on your mind, and pacify it in this way, you will definitely experience these results, and you will see them in your daily life situation. There is no need to put this into any kind of category, any kind of "ism." Venerable Gyatrul Rinpoche

Is Buddhism a religion?

Whether Buddhism is or is not a religion depends upon how you define "religion."
Government census offices and public opinion pollsters generally recognize Buddhism as a religion. Books that describe the religions of the world generally cover Buddhism along with Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, etc. Even the Boy Scouts of America, who expel Atheists, Agnostics and homosexuals, accept Buddhists as members.

The Drepung Loseling Institute states:
"Like all major religions, Buddhism contains an explanation of the origin of existence, a morality, and a specific set of rituals and behaviors. ... Buddhism presents a transformational goal, a desire to improve one's situation, and a distinct moral code. 5
However, some definitions of "religion" require a belief in the existence of one or more deities. That would disqualify most branches of Buddhism from being considered as religious groups.

Overview:

With about 365 milliion followers -- 6% of the world's population -- Buddhism is the fourth largest religion in the world. It is exceeded in numbers only by Christianity, Islam and Hinduism. Buddhism was founded in Northern India by the first known Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama. In the sixth century BCE, he attained enlightenment and assumed the title Lord Buddha (one who has awakened)
Buddhism later died out in India, but had become established in Sri Lanka. From there, it expanded across Asia, evolving into two or three main forms:
Theravada Buddhism (sometimes called Southern Buddhism; occasionally spelled Therevada) "has been the dominant school of Buddhism in most of Southeast Asia since the thirteenth century, with the establishment of the monarchies in Thailand, Burma, Cambodia and Laos." Mahayana Buddhism (sometimes called Northern Buddhism) is largely found in China, Japan, Korea, Tibet and Mongolia.Vajrayāna Buddhism (a.k.a. Tantric Buddhism, Mantrayana, Tantrayana, Esoteric Buddhism, or True Words Sect). Some consider this to bea part of Mahayana Buddhism; others view it as a third Buddhist path.
To these might be added:
Tibetan Buddhism. This developed largely in isolation from Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism because of the remoteness of Tibet.Zen Buddhism. This developed from within the Chinese Mahayana school known as Chan. Zen Buddhism is becoming increasingly popular in the West.
Since the late 19th century:
Modern Buddhism has emerged as a truly international movement. It started as an attempt to produce a single form of Buddhism, without local accretions, that all Buddhists could embrace.

Topics covered in this section:

A brief overview of the Buddha's life
Core Buddhist beliefs A summary of Buddhism
Comparison of Buddhism with Christianity
Buddhist traditions in the East and West A brief discussionTheravada Buddhism (Southern Buddhism)Mahayana tradition (Northern Buddhism)Vajrayāna Buddhism (Tantric or Esoteric Buddhism) Tibetan Buddhism (Being written)Tantric sexChán and Zen Buddhism
Buddhism and homosexuality
Sources of Buddhist information and materials

Last edited by Kerby W-R; 02-25-2008 at 10:11 AM..
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Old 02-25-2008, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Y-Town Area
3,967 posts, read 5,273,030 times
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Default The personal effects on my life

I have been practicing Buddhism for over 22 years. I believe that you should see the results of a religious practice that works in your daily life. Mine is constantly being validated. When one meditates you seem to have the ability
to see an action before it is committed. You can see anger in you before it
comes out and realize its negeative effect and stop it and turn this emotion
around all in a matter an instant. This is just one of the things that you are
able to do when you control your own mind through meditation.
Also, my life is peaceful and it is not on a roller coaster like I see so many others around me. Many people always confide in me and ask me for my opinion. One important thing is my realization that through assisting others I have grown as an individual. The more you help others the more you are stronger at doing this and the better you become.
I am not interested in trying to convert anyone. I believe we all have our own path and when you are ready to practice Buddhism you will.
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Old 02-25-2008, 10:49 AM
 
Location: The world, where will fate take me this time?
3,162 posts, read 10,922,516 times
Reputation: 1435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerby W-R View Post
I have been practicing Buddhism for over 22 years. I believe that you should see the results of a religious practice that works in your daily life. Mine is constantly being validated. When one meditates you seem to have the ability
to see an action before it is committed. You can see anger in you before it
comes out and realize its negeative effect and stop it and turn this emotion
around all in a matter an instant. This is just one of the things that you are
able to do when you control your own mind through meditation.
Also, my life is peaceful and it is not on a roller coaster like I see so many others around me. Many people always confide in me and ask me for my opinion. One important thing is my realization that through assisting others I have grown as an individual. The more you help others the more you are stronger at doing this and the better you become.
I am not interested in trying to convert anyone. I believe we all have our own path and when you are ready to practice Buddhism you will.
I believe you and I'm happy friend, I get the same results through yoga meditation.

A spiritual path in your life can help you grow profoundly huh? but like you said you need to be ready first

Love and Light!
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Old 02-25-2008, 10:51 AM
 
Location: An absurd world.
5,165 posts, read 8,679,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerby W-R View Post
I have been practicing Buddhism for over 22 years. I believe that you should see the results of a religious practice that works in your daily life. Mine is constantly being validated. When one meditates you seem to have the ability
to see an action before it is committed. You can see anger in you before it
comes out and realize its negeative effect and stop it and turn this emotion
around all in a matter an instant. This is just one of the things that you are
able to do when you control your own mind through meditation.
Also, my life is peaceful and it is not on a roller coaster like I see so many others around me. Many people always confide in me and ask me for my opinion. One important thing is my realization that through assisting others I have grown as an individual. The more you help others the more you are stronger at doing this and the better you become.
I am not interested in trying to convert anyone. I believe we all have our own path and when you are ready to practice Buddhism you will.
If I was to choose a religion, I'd probably pick Buddhism. Which sect of Buddhism are you a part of? Theravada? Mahayana (hope that's spelled right)? Japanese Shinto Buddhism? I like Buddhism and what it teaches. I don't think I could be one though. My lifestyle doesn't fit with it.
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Old 02-25-2008, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Santa Monica
4,708 posts, read 8,057,145 times
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Would a Buddhist ever fire a cruise missile?

That is a serious question, speaking to: (1) notion of military self-defense in Buddhist practice, (2) notion of organized warfare in Buddhist practice, (3) notion of remote-targeted weaponry in Buddhist practice.
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Old 02-25-2008, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Earth
1,114 posts, read 1,994,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ParkTwain View Post
Would a Buddhist ever fire a cruise missile?

That is a serious question, speaking to: (1) notion of military self-defense in Buddhist practice, (2) notion of organized warfare in Buddhist practice, (3) notion of remote-targeted weaponry in Buddhist practice.

Like anyone else a Buddhist can do whatever he wants.

“organized warfare in Buddhist practice” As far a I know, there is no organized warfare in Buddhist practice.
Of course there are countries that there main belief is Buddhism that have a military.
But that has nothing to do with what the Buddha taught. (If you know of something like this in the Pali Canon please let me know. I haven’t read the whole thing)

I can only answer this question for myself. What would I do. I would say , no thank you.
I would not fire the missile.

I hope no one come back with those ridiculous What If , questions.

And somehow I don’t think that this is the direction that Travelling fella wanted this thread to go, at least I hope not.

Peace,
Aeroman
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Old 02-25-2008, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Y-Town Area
3,967 posts, read 5,273,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haaziq View Post
If I was to choose a religion, I'd probably pick Buddhism. Which sect of Buddhism are you a part of? Theravada? Mahayana (hope that's spelled right)? Japanese Shinto Buddhism? I like Buddhism and what it teaches. I don't think I could be one though. My lifestyle doesn't fit with it.
I practice Tibetan Buddhism in the Nyingma [ancient] tradition.
I know people from all walks of life who practice Buddhism without
any problems. You practice within the ability of your lifestyle it's
that simple.
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Old 02-25-2008, 01:48 PM
 
Location: An absurd world.
5,165 posts, read 8,679,219 times
Reputation: 2019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerby W-R View Post
I practice Tibetan Buddhism in the Nyingma [ancient] tradition.
I know people from all walks of life who practice Buddhism without
any problems. You practice within the ability of your lifestyle it's
that simple.
Buddhists practice nonviolence. I don't believe in violence either, but I strongly support Second Amendment rights and self-defense. That along with a few other things are the reasons I probably couldn't be a Buddhist.

P.S. Where are you from? I didn't think anybody in the states had picked up on Nyingma or Tibetan Buddhism yet.
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Old 02-25-2008, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Earth
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My practice is closest to Theravada.
However much of the Pali Canon I don’t take literally.
My interest is in nirvana, not enlightenment .
I also have a tendency not to believe in past or future lives. However if its true or not makes not difference in how I live my life. I try to be the best person I can be regardless of punishment or reward.
I hardly do any chanting. I do a lot of meditation, and I do those more advanced forms.
I don’t talk about my meditation techniques except to those who understand them. And never talk about them on the internet. For me I find it just to difficult to communicate those ideas with the written word.
And besides there are some things with those advance techniques that I think should not be known until one is ready to understand and start practicing them.

Well, that’s about all I have to say for now.

Metta,
Aeroman
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