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Old 11-01-2012, 11:35 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 31,579,683 times
Reputation: 22473

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I recently made the decision to purchaser a new computer for my business. Rather than waiting for Windows 8, I opted to buy early so I could get a Windows 7 OS. The deciding factor was when I viewed a demo of Win 8 on youtube. And it became very apparent that Win 8 was not developed for the business user. It seems that Microsoft has forsaken the business user totally in the development of this operating system. I would be very interested In hearing the opinions of other professionals who rely heavily on computer use in the daily operation of their business and how they plan to deal with this as it pertains to future computer purchases. I have a friend who still uses Xp at his business because it is...as he puts it... "the last release that was targeted toward the business consumer". Eventually, Microsoft will make It impossible to install former OS in new computers (if they have not already). So what choices do we have PC wise?

20yrsinBranson
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Old 11-01-2012, 11:40 PM
 
18,847 posts, read 33,232,168 times
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I am not a business owner, but I buy and deal with a lot of computers and software. Windows seven has been a difficult OS, because of all the patches needed for adaptive software. XP was much better. I am not pleased about Windows Eight.
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Old 11-02-2012, 01:34 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 28,070,468 times
Reputation: 6836
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I recently made the decision to purchaser a new computer for my business. Rather than waiting for Windows 8, I opted to buy early so I could get a Windows 7 OS. The deciding factor was when I viewed a demo of Win 8 on youtube. And it became very apparent that Win 8 was not developed for the business user. It seems that Microsoft has forsaken the business user totally in the development of this operating system. I would be very interested In hearing the opinions of other professionals who rely heavily on computer use in the daily operation of their business and how they plan to deal with this as it pertains to future computer purchases. I have a friend who still uses Xp at his business because it is...as he puts it... "the last release that was targeted toward the business consumer". Eventually, Microsoft will make It impossible to install former OS in new computers (if they have not already). So what choices do we have PC wise?

20yrsinBranson
Relax, it's all going to be in the cloud soon. Why would you want to maintain all that technology on an individual device?
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Old 11-02-2012, 02:28 AM
 
24,497 posts, read 36,931,521 times
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I'm a business owner in the IT industry. I'm actually a proponent of Windows 8. It's not much different than Windows 7 other than a better user experience when it comes to launching applications.

I do feel the new settings control menu confusing and it will take time for people to learn. Fortunately, the control panel still exists for those who don't care to learn the new way.
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Old 11-02-2012, 08:08 AM
 
4,761 posts, read 11,957,070 times
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Many years ago Microsoft wanted to hire only people who had not worked elsewhere - were fresh out of college, etc. That was so they could teach them the "Microsoft way", etc.

Well I think having all those employees who are "out of touch" with the real world is coming back to haunt them. They don't listen to their customers. And never seem to do anything about things many many people complain about. And they remove / change things which people have spent a lot of time learning and have come to depend on, with NO regard for those people. Quote: "You will get used to it" is what one of these Microsoft people said about one such change!

Microsoft (if they want to save their company and it DOES need saving at this point) needs to take a lesson from Coca Cola... Many years ago they came out with "New Coke". Their customers did not like it. So they brought back "Classic Coke" and also offered "Cherry Coke", "Diet Coke", etc. Then the customer could purchase what they preferred. Simple!

Many people like XP. Others may like Windows 7. Some like old Office, some like new Office. Microsoft should offer several different products and let their customers choose what they prefer. Simple!

In the 90's I wanted Microsoft everything - I knew it would all work together. Now I don't want Microsoft anything. I want to get rid of my new Office and its "ribbons". Open Office sounds REAL good! And I am considering switching to some other operating system.

They are losing me as a customer...
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Old 11-02-2012, 10:11 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 31,579,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
Relax, it's all going to be in the cloud soon. Why would you want to maintain all that technology on an individual device?
As a business owner, the LAST thing I would want is to be dependant upon internet access to run my business. Depending on an undependable third party I as begging for disaster. In Springfield both Mediacom and AT&T have experienced multi-day outages in the past few months. I cannot afford the luxury of internet access that works intermittently. Anyone who relies on cloud services to run their business is a fool.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 11-02-2012, 10:20 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 31,579,683 times
Reputation: 22473
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I'm a business owner in the IT industry. I'm actually a proponent of Windows 8. It's not much different than Windows 7 other than a better user experience when it comes to launching applications.

I do feel the new settings control menu confusing and it will take time for people to learn. Fortunately, the control panel still exists for those who don't care to learn the new way.
I don't think that most people, especially those who are concerned with productivity are much interested in learning something "new" when they have something that works and works well already. Win 8 does not offer anything worth the effort of dealing with the learning curve. The demo I viewed dealt with games and social media. Professionals are not going to take this seriously, they are going to shake their heads and say...what is in this for the business person? They may put it on their personal computer, but at work you are going to see Win 7 and XP for a long time to come.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 11-02-2012, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Beavercreek, OH
2,194 posts, read 3,314,556 times
Reputation: 2342
Hi all--

I'm still a fan of Windows 2000 with regards to stability and reliability. Windows XP, starting with Service Pack 2 and an array of anti-virus and anti-malware software, is also good.

Windows Vista is ****. Windows 7 is no better. My Windows 7 PC likes to self-destruct randomly. Things stop working randomly, programs stop responding randomly, things disappear, my icons get screwed up, etc. with no rhyme or reason.

I still use Office 2003 because the ribbon idea is **** and Office 2010 is incredibly slow to load and operate when I do have to use it on other people's computers.

As a current law student who would likely set up a firm in the near future (less than two years), I would only grudgingly use Windows 7 computers. I have four computers, two or which have Windows 7, and I hate them both

Windows 8? Forget about it. It'll be a cold night in hell before I let someone else's grubby fingers touch my expensive touch-screen monitor.
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Old 11-02-2012, 01:23 PM
 
24,497 posts, read 36,931,521 times
Reputation: 12865
Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
Hi all--

I'm still a fan of Windows 2000 with regards to stability and reliability. Windows XP, starting with Service Pack 2 and an array of anti-virus and anti-malware software, is also good.

Windows Vista is ****. Windows 7 is no better. My Windows 7 PC likes to self-destruct randomly. Things stop working randomly, programs stop responding randomly, things disappear, my icons get screwed up, etc. with no rhyme or reason.

I still use Office 2003 because the ribbon idea is **** and Office 2010 is incredibly slow to load and operate when I do have to use it on other people's computers.

As a current law student who would likely set up a firm in the near future (less than two years), I would only grudgingly use Windows 7 computers. I have four computers, two or which have Windows 7, and I hate them both

Windows 8? Forget about it. It'll be a cold night in hell before I let someone else's grubby fingers touch my expensive touch-screen monitor.
I still think Windows 2000 was their best OS. However, I had no issues with Windows Vista and 7. Windows XP was just a bloated version of Windows 2000 imo.

Have you used Windows 8 with a touchscreen? It blows. Windows 8 is a dream with a regular mouse.... but with a touchscreen, the UX sucks.
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Old 11-02-2012, 01:26 PM
 
24,497 posts, read 36,931,521 times
Reputation: 12865
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post

I don't think that most people, especially those who are concerned with productivity are much interested in learning something "new" when they have something that works and works well already. Win 8 does not offer anything worth the effort of dealing with the learning curve. The demo I viewed dealt with games and social media. Professionals are not going to take this seriously, they are going to shake their heads and say...what is in this for the business person? They may put it on their personal computer, but at work you are going to see Win 7 and XP for a long time to come.

20yrsinBranson
I have 21 people using Windows 8 in my office and I use it myself on one of my laptops. It's not much different than Windows 7 and allows you to do anything Windows 7 does. It DOES have that (formerly knowns as) Metro UI.... but you don't need to use those apps. You can dumb down Metro to be a start menu (which is much more efficient than Windows 7 start menu).

Having to learn a newer thing has always been an issue for people.
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