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Old 05-30-2013, 11:50 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
24,672 posts, read 32,343,861 times
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Has anyone done a survey? I suspect that most C students are now pumping gas or serving burgers.

In this country you don't have to be able to even read or do addition in order to graduate from high school with a C average. One of my friends with a high school diploma thinks that Canada is one of the states and that New Mexico is a foreign country. Believe me, she didn't grow up to own a corporation. Last I heard, she was living on welfare.

The usual life course for an underachiever is to always remain an underachiever.
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Old 05-30-2013, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,242 posts, read 5,596,512 times
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I was not "C" student in high school. I graduated with a 4.3 on a 5.0 scale. Once in college though I had to split time between being on the executive board of my fraternity for 3 years and working 25 hour weeks and serving as a member on the IFC board. Between those three things my grades suffered a little bit. I graduated with a 2.75 from a 4 year university. It wasn't superior, in fact it kind of sucked. But I would not trade my experiences learned through those activities for a 4.0 if I was given the option. Learning how to run a successful fraternity of 50 men was far more valuable than any of my classes.

I am not trying to prove the book right, I am just shining some light into how it MAY be true in some cases. Are there people who could have done all of the above and still have gotten a 4.0? Yes there is. My old president had a 4.0 upon graduation and is VERY VERY successful. There are a lot of very smart kids who are socially awkward, those are the types that will not be successful in management and thus would probably suffer at running their own business.

BTW I am very successful despite my "average" GPA.
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Old 05-30-2013, 08:34 PM
 
6,559 posts, read 4,123,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Has anyone done a survey? I suspect that most C students are now pumping gas or serving burgers.

In this country you don't have to be able to even read or do addition in order to graduate from high school with a C average. One of my friends with a high school diploma thinks that Canada is one of the states and that New Mexico is a foreign country. Believe me, she didn't grow up to own a corporation. Last I heard, she was living on welfare.

The usual life course for an underachiever is to always remain an underachiever.
I'd imagine I'm probably a C student. Somewhere in the B - C range.

Those A students...

They pay the mortgage for one of my investment properties.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
I am not saying that C students are not successful as many of them are allready working on something while in school. Kind of why they are C students, they spend time on more than just school. That is not something that is new to hear though. Kiyosaki regurgitates what others have said. Still, I know lots of A students that are doing just fine and many have also started business's of their own. You just can't label everyone and place them in the same bucket. The world does not work that way. I can point you to people that will not settle for second best and were infact A students, went on to build successfull business operations, and still have that attitude of being 1st in life. Settling for anything less just is not part of the plan for these people.
School to me was a waste of time. I recently finished my bachelors, because my mother wanted me to have a bachelors. I never read the text books, never really studied, it was just a miserable experience I had to get through to please my parent.

Of course, I'm always working on my own thing. I've been self-employed since 18, and have zero intention of working for others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
If you are an entrepreneur at heart, think about what you like and don't like. Entrepreneurs despise routine, question the status quo, and are generally independent as a hog on ice. This is a prescription for failure in the highly-regimented world of high school. Yet it is also the requirement for success in business ownership.
School teaches you to memorize. It teaches you to follow rules. I've never found it engaging. I slept in the back row through high school and did it in three years. The hardest part of college was actually having the energy to go to the energy draining lectures.

I was there when no child left behind took effect in high school. We went from having three tiers of classes to two. Today, it is about keeping the bottom with the top, not teaching to those who can learn. It is about teaching so the students can pass a test, not succeed at life.

And with the outrageous reasons for discipling kids that keep popping up in the news, administration is turning into despots.
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Old 06-01-2013, 09:02 PM
 
48,509 posts, read 86,989,142 times
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Stay up late when sick one night and see the get rich tapes. books etc. being sold to people who are desperate and don't have to get up to go to work next day.
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Old 06-02-2013, 05:12 AM
 
1,924 posts, read 2,064,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiGuy2.5 View Post
There are a lot of very smart kids who are socially awkward...
It's more the case that many fall for a pointless grade-school stereotype claiming that smarter kids are disproportionately awkward in a social setting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiGuy2.5 View Post
....those are the types that will not be successful in management and thus would probably suffer at running their own business.
Running your own business is a notoriously bad way to try to become successful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiGuy2.5 View Post
BTW I am very successful despite my "average" GPA.
Yeah, and I'll bet you're great in bed and your investment portfolio was up 500% last year as well.
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Old 06-02-2013, 05:26 AM
 
1,924 posts, read 2,064,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
Those A students...They pay the mortgage for one of my investment properties.
LOL. They also school you on internet chat forums.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
School to me was a waste of time.
You might have a point there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
I never read the text books, never really studied, it was just a miserable experience I had to get through to please my parent.
Way to take advantage. Do you think this sort of slackerness influenced your atiitudes toward education any?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
Of course, I'm always working on my own thing. I've been self-employed since 18, and have zero intention of working for others.
Those with talent of any sort work WITH others, not FOR them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
School teaches you to memorize. It teaches you to follow rules. I've never found it engaging. I slept in the back row through high school and did it in three years. The hardest part of college was actually having the energy to go to the energy draining lectures.
School teaches how to learn and how to think, how to understand and navigate within networks, paradigms, and systems of rules and laws and tendencies. The hardest part of any school lies in actually acquiring the education that it has to offer. Many are just not up to that task.

Last edited by oaktonite; 06-02-2013 at 05:48 AM..
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Old 06-02-2013, 05:48 AM
 
1,924 posts, read 2,064,455 times
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Otherwise, it's always good to see self-serving hucksters exposed. Hard to admire those whose profit comes from deliberately exploiting and manipulating others.
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Old 06-02-2013, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Striving for Avalon
1,431 posts, read 2,182,800 times
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Another assertion never accompanied by data. Anyone?
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Old 06-02-2013, 05:31 PM
 
505 posts, read 679,474 times
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I doubt there is any hard data to support the whole "A Students end up working for C students" thing, but I think there is just a tiny bit of truth in it that causes people to believe it. Why?

1. The top students don't always choose the most lucrative career paths. Just as an example, one of the top two students from my high school class is now a professor at a top university and the other one is an engineer in a niche field. They've certainly been successful, but there are many A-/B+ students who are making more than them because they chose more lucrative careers.

2. As you move up, "soft skills" become much more important. For example, to move to the highest levels of a business (or a law, accounting or consulting firm), it is not enough to do the things that make you successful in school and in the lower levels of the professional world like being smart, hard working, and becoming expert in your area. Once you have all that, to move up you have to be good at a bunch of stuff school doesn't teach or measure like managing projects and budgets, leading people, networking, building relationships with clients, and most importantly selling, selling, selling.

3. School encourages you to follow one very well defined path to "get the gold star" but the real world isn't like this, and is becoming less so every day. Many of the most successful entrepreneurs have succeeded because they went off the established path and did something new and awesome.
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Old 06-02-2013, 06:04 PM
 
1,924 posts, read 2,064,455 times
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A's open doors. C's don't. After that it's up to the individual to make what he will of things, but indeed, many of those doors that are opened to the A's are in government and the academic sector. You can get financially comfortable there, but you can't really get rich. The non-monetary rewards still seem to be enough to pique the interest of the best and the brightest though.
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