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Old 03-10-2008, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 2,252,963 times
Reputation: 369

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Quote:
FORTUNE Small Business) -- Dear FSB: One of my employees is pretty capable, but she lacks people skills. No one in the office likes dealing with her. Recently she called me at home at 9 P.M. on a Friday, crying and saying she was typing up her résumé because the entire staff was against her. I listened, and then hinted that it wasn't the time or place to discuss this. Now office tension is high. Can I tell this woman that, because she said she was updating her résumé, I assume she's given notice?
Can I fire an unpopular worker? - Mar. 10, 2008
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Old 03-10-2008, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 22,244,634 times
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Is she doing her work? Does she work alone? If yes and yes, find a more isloated place for her and keep her away from the other employees. If she is otherwise a good and reliable employee, I would try to keep her. Some of the best workers I know have personality problems.
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Old 03-10-2008, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 2,252,963 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevK View Post
Is she doing her work? Does she work alone? If yes and yes, find a more isloated place for her and keep her away from the other employees. If she is otherwise a good and reliable employee, I would try to keep her. Some of the best workers I know have personality problems.
I'm presuming that this is a small business from the tone of the inquiry. Should this be the situation, trying to isolate a particular employee due to poor people skills would be counter productive. I worked in a small office of about 15 persons, there was no practical way to prevent all persons in the office from interacting with each other on a daily business. it was necessary for the operation of the business. Employee isolation might be possible in a larger setting, but that also generates another set of problems with staff relations. Cutting this employee loose is the best compromise available in this situation, anything else will work to the detriment of the employer and employee.
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Old 03-10-2008, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
857 posts, read 4,600,906 times
Reputation: 835
I don't know if I would go so far as to fire her if she is doing her job, but I would certainly encourage her if she said that she is updating her resume. If you tell her that you would be happy to give her a good reference then maybe she will get the hint that it isn't just her co-workers that wish she would go.
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Old 03-10-2008, 04:09 PM
b75
 
950 posts, read 3,250,566 times
Reputation: 329
If the person is doing their job, acting polite & professional to their co-workers, then the other people in the office need a big lesson in growing the hell up. We go to work to earn a paycheck, not b/c we need to expand our social network. Nobody deserves to be made to feel like an outsider if they are appropriately alleviating the work load in the office. It is to the company's detriment that they let the work place get that cliquish. FTR, I understand that making friends can increase a person's enjoyment of the job, but the number one reason they are there is to still perform a job.
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Old 03-10-2008, 04:31 PM
 
Location: hinesburg, vt
1,574 posts, read 4,530,469 times
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Before terminating an employee I would recommend consulting with an attorney who deals with employment law issues in your jurisdiction. Wrongful termination suits and awards could otherwise create a very nasty and expensive situation.
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Old 03-10-2008, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Lovelock, NV - Anchorage, AK
1,195 posts, read 5,094,021 times
Reputation: 465
Are you in a Hire and Fire at will state? I would think that if she completey disrupts the flow of work, you could let her go. Some people just can't get along no matter how hard they try, if you have a small office that can be very challenging.

We have a small office in one of our outlying branches, our receptionist use to be an office manager but now has taken the position assists all employees and she has no knowledge how to do that anymore. This is causing a great deal of challenges, we recently addressed it and things are getting better but I don't believe they will ever get where they need to be to run smoothly.
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Old 03-10-2008, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Lovelock, NV - Anchorage, AK
1,195 posts, read 5,094,021 times
Reputation: 465
I have a friend who does her job very well she is a credit collector, she has zero people skills, her bosses love her work but they dislike her people skills she does do a good job they are keeping her. Her lack of people skills is running off good employees that have a great deal of potential. So in the long run the company is suffering and missing out on great people who can't work with this one. Amazes me as the way it's going there will come a time she will have nothing to collect cuz there will be no body to sell the product.
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Old 03-10-2008, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 2,252,963 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by b75 View Post
If the person is doing their job, acting polite & professional to their co-workers, then the other people in the office need a big lesson in growing the hell up. We go to work to earn a paycheck, not b/c we need to expand our social network. Nobody deserves to be made to feel like an outsider if they are appropriately alleviating the work load in the office. It is to the company's detriment that they let the work place get that cliquish. FTR, I understand that making friends can increase a person's enjoyment of the job, but the number one reason they are there is to still perform a job.
Some persons posses little or no social skills. Being employed in an office workplace environment is difficult for the non-skilled social person. I'm 61 years old and I can tell you that going to a job that you hate is not a good thing, no matter the paycheck. I have quit several jobs with little or no notice because it was an overwhelming and stressful effort just to arrive at work on a daily basis. Hating one's job or place of employment makes for a bad employee and bad employer-employee relations; been there, done that.

The type of person described in the story would be better served personally, socially and financially if she were self-employed and/or was in an independent contractor relationship with little or no oversight or social contacts.
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Old 03-10-2008, 05:27 PM
b75
 
950 posts, read 3,250,566 times
Reputation: 329
I'm not sure how your responses honestly refuted what I said.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hazzard View Post
Some persons posses little or no social skills. Being employed in an office workplace environment is difficult for the non-skilled social person. I'm 61 years old and I can tell you that going to a job that you hate is not a good thing, no matter the paycheck. I have quit several jobs with little or no notice because it was an overwhelming and stressful effort just to arrive at work on a daily basis. Hating one's job or place of employment makes for a bad employee and bad employer-employee relations; been there, done that.

The type of person described in the story would be better served personally, socially and financially if she were self-employed and/or was in an independent contractor relationship with little or no oversight or social contacts.
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