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Old 02-21-2018, 11:57 AM
 
18,094 posts, read 15,204,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastVigilante View Post
As an outsider (blue collar) guy I had a chance to talk to my niece who used to work in an office building in downtown Dallas over the weekend.She has worked in Chicago,Charlotte,Baltimore,and very briefly in Manhattan.And what she told me was that the corporate world can be a very vindictive place with mean girl bosses,douchy CEO's,and money hungry back stabbers.What surprised me is that she is a very sweet,easygoing attractive woman in her late 20s and was often told she had to be a real office b-i-t-c-h to get ahead in that field.She came back home here in Texas to be closer to her side of the family and is now trying to start her own small online business.Now I understand that there are cut throat people in all fields,but let's put our common sense hats on ,they ain't making movies about the heartless power hungry world of small farm owners,plumbers,air duct cleaners,mechanics,etc.etc.
So why has this one field of work created so much nasty people?

I worked in the federal government and now in the private sector in finance, and there are a lot of bitter people, more so than when I was in construction and the military. I would not even call it cut throat or anything, just bitter people, not ever happy, maybe hating the job but got the golden handcuffs.


I really do not think a lot of them understand how good they have it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JPrzybylski07 View Post
Because people waste the majority of their one and only precious life in cube farms?
Versus doing what else for income?
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Old 02-23-2018, 07:39 AM
 
943 posts, read 481,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post



Versus doing what else for income?



I was just answering the question. I can't figure out 100 million other people's lives for them. But that is the answer to the question. I would be bitter too if I was working in the rat race for 40 years in a cube farm, but I'm not, and I'm grateful for that.
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Old 02-23-2018, 09:09 AM
 
6,932 posts, read 3,129,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPrzybylski07 View Post
I was just answering the question. I can't figure out 100 million other people's lives for them. But that is the answer to the question. I would be bitter too if I was working in the rat race for 40 years in a cube farm, but I'm not, and I'm grateful for that.
Nobody is putting a gun to anyone's head and chaining them to work in a cubicle. If they feel imprisoned, it's their own fault. No one else's.

Second, I don't think people are all that miserable. It really depends on what survey you read and how they phrase the question, but most people feel fulfilled enough at work. Sure, they'll complain. But not so much that they'll gnaw off their arm to escape the trap.

But for those few who are indeed miserable?

If you don't like your job, find another job. You might not get one next week, but if you start networking and developing your skills, you will soon enough. The people I've encountered in life who feel imprisoned in their jobs have been, without exception, the ones who never lifted a finger to improve their marketability. They won't take classes to learn new skills. They won't go to industry association meetings. They won't call colleagues up and go to lunch. They won't learn new things. They just want some career fairy godmother to rescue them.

My wife is the CFO of a sizable company. She took the position two years ago and, the first week, she was shocked at how little the staff knew how to work Excel. I mean, we're talking people with umpteen years in the field, and they hadn't mastered the ins and outs of a simple spreadsheet, despite there being classes, YouTube videos, online forums, and a host of other tools readily available for anyone with the least amount of initiative. She started almost immediately kicking tail. Today, she has a staff that knows how to use the fundamental tool in their workplace.

If you feel you're not appreciated enough in your job, figure out the path to get a bigger paycheck and better position. You might need better people skills. You might need to learn new things. You might need to listen better. You might have to acquire a decent wardrobe. But there's something you can do about it. Show me someone who complains about office politics and getting passed over for promotion, and I'll show you someone who was passed over for some pretty good reasons that they won't admit.

If you don't like working for someone else, then hone your skills and contacts and work for yourself. There's linked in. There are networking opportunities galore. Join the Chamber of Commerce. Take a class. Go to community college. Slowly build your escape pod. But if you're still complaining about being trapped in your job five years from now, it's because you chose to be your own jailor.

If you feel like you have to work like a quarry-slave because you have a wad of bills big enough to choke a horse, then start figuring out how to reduce your expenses and debt. There are about a zillion articles online detailing how to do this. Move into a smaller house. Buy the used car rather than the new one. Bring your lunch rather than buy it.

If you live in an uber-expensive part of the country that you can barely afford or in a place with diminished opportunity, pick up and move. People have been doing this since the dawn of time. If you live in the United States and are moldering away in some backwater with limited opportunity, then hie thyself somewhere else. I mean, the last time I was in Denver, they were advertising on the radio for people to work in the oil fields of North Dakota. Big salaries. Week-off/week-on schedules. You name it.

I mean, hell, I had a job in my mid-twenties that was awful. I worked for a husband-wife team who thought nothing of asking the staff to work 80-hour weeks. Yet I recognized that I needed to cultivate skills and contacts to make my break. I chose the line of work I wanted to be in. I went to association meetings. I made contacts. I wrote letters. I offered to do work for free just to prove my abilities. I plugged away at it. It took a year, but I was able to walk out the door into a job I absolutely loved. Same thing when I started my own business. My wife and I planned our lives around how we would live off her income alone while I got the biz off the ground. It wasn't easy, but we're much happier because of it.

People have agency over their own lives, but choose not to exercise it. I really don't feel sorry for anyone who allows inertia to rule their lives.

Last edited by MinivanDriver; 02-23-2018 at 09:24 AM..
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Old 02-23-2018, 09:13 AM
 
943 posts, read 481,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
You know, this is kind of a ridiculous statement. First, the haughty condescension is a bit too much. They really don't need you to figure out their lives for them, thanks.

Second, nobody is putting a gun to anyone's head and chaining them to work in a cubicle. If they feel imprisoned, it's their own fault. No one else's.

Third, I don't think people are all that miserable. It really depends on what survey you read and how they phrase the question, but most people feel fulfilled enough at work. Sure, they'll complain. But not so much that they'll gnaw off their arm to escape the trap.

If you don't like your job, find another job. You might not get one next week, but if you start networking and developing your skills, you will soon enough.

If you feel you're not appreciated enough in your job, figure out the path to get a bigger paycheck and better position. You might need better people skills. You might need to learn new things. You might need to listen better. But there's something you can do about it.

If you don't like working for someone else, then hone your skills and contacts and work for yourself.

If you feel like you have to work like a quarry-slave because you have a wad of bills big enough to choke a horse, then start figuring out how to reduce your expenses and debt. There are about a zillion articles online detailing how to do this.

If you live in an uber-expensive part of the country or in a place with diminished opportunity, pick up and move. People have been doing this since the dawn of time. If you live in the United States and are moldering away in some backwater with limited opportunity, then hie thyself somewhere else. I mean, the last time I was in Denver, they were advertising on the radio for people to work in the oil fields of North Dakota. Big salaries. Week-off/week-on schedules. You name it.

People have agency over their own lives, but choose not to exercise it. I really don't feel sorry for anyone who allows inertia to rule their lives.
That was my 2 cents on why people are so bitter. I don't think people are all that miserable, but I wouldn't say the majority are happy either. I can only speak for myself when I say I would be bitter too spending 40 years in the corporate world.


Many people trap themselves in the rat race and then have no easy way out and that's what makes them bitter.
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Old 02-23-2018, 09:30 AM
 
6,932 posts, read 3,129,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JPrzybylski07 View Post
That was my 2 cents on why people are so bitter. I don't think people are all that miserable, but I wouldn't say the majority are happy either. I can only speak for myself when I say I would be bitter too spending 40 years in the corporate world.


Many people trap themselves in the rat race and then have no easy way out and that's what makes them bitter.
Nothing in life worth having is easy. And anyone who is bitter about spending 40 years in the corporate world either a) made bad career decisions in what kind of company they chose to serve or b) have the people skills of a turnip.

There are great companies and there are horrid ones. I do a lot of consulting, and I've seen companies where the employees love coming to work every day. And I see companies where employees have a bunker mentality. You can see it on their faces. You can just tell from the energy in the halls.

But these people are not victims. They have only themselves to blame if they reach age 65 and are bitter about where they worked for the past 40 years.
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Old 02-23-2018, 09:55 AM
 
943 posts, read 481,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
Nothing in life worth having is easy. And anyone who is bitter about spending 40 years in the corporate world either a) made bad career decisions in what kind of company they chose to serve or b) have the people skills of a turnip.

There are great companies and there are horrid ones. I do a lot of consulting, and I've seen companies where the employees love coming to work every day. And I see companies where employees have a bunker mentality. You can see it on their faces. You can just tell from the energy in the halls.

But these people are not victims. They have only themselves to blame if they reach age 65 and are bitter about where they worked for the past 40 years.
Agreed. I mean, I think less then 1% of the population gets to the end of their life on their death bed wishing they had worked more.....


If someone can honestly say they love going to work everyday then they are truly blessed. The majority of people work is just a means to an end.


My advice, one should never attach their ego or identity with their job or title. Just my opinion. But that doesn't mean you can't love what you do.


If you wouldn't do your job for free (assuming your current lifestyle is paid off in full forever) then you probably don't love your job.
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Old 02-23-2018, 11:06 AM
 
644 posts, read 211,742 times
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bc there're a lot of ass kissing and back stabbing, you worked 50 weeks a year for 40 years with no real vacation until you're old enough to retire and can't do most of what you used to and in many cases it's all done to chase materialistic garbage you never even get to enjoy.
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Old 02-23-2018, 08:57 PM
 
1,092 posts, read 1,343,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastVigilante View Post
As an outsider (blue collar) guy I had a chance to talk to my niece who used to work in an office building in downtown Dallas over the weekend.She has worked in Chicago,Charlotte,Baltimore,and very briefly in Manhattan.And what she told me was that the corporate world can be a very vindictive place with mean girl bosses,douchy CEO's,and money hungry back stabbers.What surprised me is that she is a very sweet,easygoing attractive woman in her late 20s and was often told she had to be a real office b-i-t-c-h to get ahead in that field.She came back home here in Texas to be closer to her side of the family and is now trying to start her own small online business.Now I understand that there are cut throat people in all fields,but let's put our common sense hats on ,they ain't making movies about the heartless power hungry world of small farm owners,plumbers,air duct cleaners,mechanics,etc.etc.
So why has this one field of work created so much nasty people?
Manhattan

The end, ignore anyone that is not a New Yorker.

In this city, women have to work 3 times as hard as a male and may not get rewarded. Even when they reach the top, still have to constantly prove themselves. This hostile work environment (high stress) ironically has the opposite effect. Instead of women trying to help each other climb the corporate ladder, they are more inclined to hog the spotlight and throw you under the bus. When the stakes are high, it brings out the worse in people, especially women since they are always fighting to be seen as equals.
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Old 02-28-2018, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
928 posts, read 1,162,987 times
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As many others highlighted earlier, it depends on the personality of the individual and the organization's culture. I have spent considerable amount of time in the Corporate world, never felt bitter or "boxed in" by the organization because I always had other things going on (Education/Professional Development, Real Estate Investments etc.) and was (thankfully) never in a position where the job was the end all. My pay has been nice, bonuses - a welcome supplement to my income, good benefits and offers for 100% sponsorship for Business School in two separate organizations. Sure, I work hard, play nice, however the rewards far out pace the "crap" you have to deal with.

That being said, I am dedicating the next 3 years towards becoming financially independent through consulting, Real Estate investment income. Not because I am miserable and want to break out of the Corporate world, but rather to honor a commitment of time flexibility and financial freedom that I made to myself years ago. I'll still probably work part time in the corporate world for socialization, benefits (medical, dental), however working 3 days out of 7 is not too bad
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Old 05-26-2018, 12:03 AM
 
2,406 posts, read 1,005,792 times
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You mean blue collar jobs like farm workers, plumbing, mechanics, and air duct cleaners don't have people problems? Why?? Is it because they work alone?

Ever notice that office workers work in 1 big room with a LOT of people in it? Heck, even a small biz with 5 people in it can create people problems. Why? Because they need to talk to each other to get their job done. The more you have to work with other people, the more you will have problems with them. Different personalities offending each other, bad habits, different working styles. All will rub each other the wrong way eventually. And just hanging out with other people in the same room causes gossiping. In other words, working with people in so close proximity with you cause a ton of people problems.

And the hierarchy that exists when there are too many people on different rungs of the ladder. Competition ensues, backstabbing to climb up the ladder, unethical, immoral people. Don't blue collar jobs have a hierarchy too? I find it hard to believe there are no (fewer??) people problems there.
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